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March 16, 1989 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-16

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Page 12 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 16, 1989
Wrestlers to shoot for
title in Oklahoma City

BY STEVEN COHEN
This year's national wrestling
tournament, which begins today in
Oklahoma City, promises to be the
most wide-open tournament in years.
As many as six teams are in
contention for the national title:
Iowa, Oklahoma State, 'Arizona
State, Iowa State, Michigan, and
Penn State.
Though second-ranked Oklahoma
State qualified the maximum ten
wrestlers for the tournament, the
team is not a heavy favorite, as it
lacks wrestlers who are considered
candidates to win their weight
classes.
No.1 ranked Iowa is always a
threat, having won nine of the last
eleven titles. But the Hawkeyes,
which owed its victory in the Big
Tens to some surprising perform-
ances, are certainly not clearcut

favorites.
THE WOLVERINES, who
finished in sixth place last season,
return six wrestlers with NCAA
tournament experience. Four of the
six earned All-American recognition,
leaving Michigan with the most
returning NCAA points in the
country.
But the Wolverines will have to
put forth a better effort than they did
at the Big Ten Championships,
where they placed third behind Iowa
and Minnesota.
"We had some good individual
performances but as a team we really
didn't wrestle our best," said 158-
pounder Joe Pantaleo, who finished
second at the Big Tens to
Minnesota's Gordy Morgan.
"It depends on which Michigan
team decides to show up. If we wres-
tle like we did at Big Tens - no,

JOSE JUAREZJDaIky
Michigan's NCAA qualifiers. (Front Row) John Moore, John Fisher,
Larry Gotcher, Sam Amine. (Top row) Bob Potokar, Fritz Lehrke,

Mike Amine, and Joe Pantaleo.
we're not going to (win) it."
LAST SEASON, Iowa wrestled
to a second-place finish by having
three finalists. Michigan aims to ac-
complish a similar feat, with its four
returning All-Americans - 134-
pounder John Fisher, 142-pounder
Larry Gotcher, Pantaleo, and 167-
pounder Mike Amine.
"My gut feeling is that it will
take a team with at least one or two
national champs to win it," Mich-
igan coach Dale Bahr said. "Two
national champs and three All-
Americans can win it because there
are so many teams in contention."

Women's swimmers
aim for top 10 position
BY ERIC LEMONT
It's the post-season and, of course, pools are involved. But don't pick
Michigan to finish in the final four. And don't look toward Illinois as the
favorite - they weren't invited to this tournament.
Texas, Florida and Stanford will battle for first place at the NCAA
Swimming and Diving Championships this weekend in Indianapolis.
"On paper, I don't think we're strong enough to go top five, but
finishing in the top ten is very realistic," said Michigan head coach Jim
Richardson of his 7-0 Wolverines.
"Our goal is perfectly simple," he said. "We're just going to try and
swim fast. We really have no control over what other people do."
Roughly 60 of the 200 Division I swimming schools had swimmers
qualify for the meet, but only a small percentage of them had enough
swimmers qualify to challenge for a high team score. Michigan is well
represented with 12 swimmers and 2 divers attending the championships.
MICHIGAN'S best chance for a first place finish is Ann Colloton;
who is seeded first in the 200-yard breaststroke. While the national record of
1 minute, 11.4 seconds might be out of reach, Colloton hopes to improve
on her 1:14.0 mark from last season's meet.
"I want to do my best and to go faster than I did last year. If I do that I
have a good chance of winning," Colloton said. "And if I win, I want to win
impressively."
Michigan's finest swimmer throughout the season, Gwen DeMaat, will
be racing in up to 6 events though her main goal is to do well in the 500
freestyle and the 400 individual medley. DeMaat feels she has "an outside
chance" of winning the medley but will face tough competition from
Stanford's Michelle Griglione and Florida's Julie Gorman.
Richardson's main concerns surrounds the emotion state of his team.
"This is an odd year in the sense that they've been the same emotionally
throughout the season. But I think that our enthusiasm will be there once
the meet starts," he said.
Colloton also feels the team will be ready mentally for championship
swimming. "I know we'll put it together," she said. "We always do."

Gotcher, this year's Big Ten
champ, ranks fourth nationally. He
breezed to the conference title,
including a 10-3 decision of seventh-
ranked Stacy Richmond. Last season
Gotcher placed fifth.
Amine, who has been beset by
knee and shoulder injuries this
season, finally appears healthy. Last
year's NCAA runner-up, Amine
took fifth at the competitive Big
Tens. Amine's shoulder injury
seems to be a thing of the past.
"He's looked incredible in practice
lately," Pantaleo said.

JIICHIGBA$ 3

gambling,

games,

and a good time

At

Wednesday, March 15
9:30pm Battle of the Bands
Thursday, March 16
9:30pm Battle of the Bands
Friday, March 17
9:00pm Jazz Cafe
'Saturday, March 18*
8:00pm Arcade
Battle of the Bands Finals
Carnival
Casino
Ice Cream Eating Contest

CAREER PATHWAYS:
A Feminist Perspective.
A panel discussion for all students
interested in Women's Studies and
career opportunities.
Included in the panel will
be a business consultant, a lawyer,
a health administrator and a
psychologist.
Refreshments will be served.
Monday, March 20,3:30-5:30.
Michigan Union,
Anderson Room.

0I

* A.
Michigras Grand Prizes Include:
A Trip For Two To Atlantic City
A Typewriter From At&T
A Pizza A Week For A Year From Bell's Pizza
100 Free Video Rentals From Study Break
All Events To Be Held In The Michigan Union

g LoLl1 -J~Ll

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BEBR JRIBIfl

FRRBKLIBI

10

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A Joint Program in English of the ECOLE CENTRALE, HEC and the
INSTITUT D'ETUDES POLITIQUES DE PARIS
Waris Summer Program in 'EngfisF

A

june 18

yufy

21,

1989

A program for North American graduate students in business, engineering, economics, law and political science, organized
by the 3 top French graduate schools:
EUROPEAN STRATEGIC ISSUES IN THE YEAR 2000

A window onto the economic

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,technological, and political environments, which shape today the Europe of tomorrow.
THE COURSE
The program consists of a 5 week intensive course, emphasizing this year the derc
sectors of Aerospace, Aeronautics, Computer Science, and Telecommunications. 'liversitd pe i
Students study through lectures, workshops, conferences, case studies and per- c osorof essoro nacadenie.
sonal research, the major characteristics of commerce, industry, technology, and po- . Mst s tUo'1. eachinsrr
litical life in the EEC and its member countries, with a particular accent on the effects r iesrankn.Jp C/l9the
of the 1992 Unified Market. e arien Cs ranOf
A personal research project is to be completed by each student for oral presen- I,9juSt Pryoressember
tation before a jury who awards the Benjamin Franklin Program Diploma. rs wllU
COURSE OUTUNE pate jn the
-Introduction: Major characteristics of commerce and industry in the EEC
and its member countries in view of the 1992 Unified Market.

0
6

- Human Resources:
-European Technology:
-Financial and CommercialI
SFinanoe:

A historical perspective
Issues specific to Europe
The industrial context
The integration of international differences
An overview
The industrial context: the importance of technology
Strategies to gain access to technolgy
Research and development
Manaaement:

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Cost:ir~

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iwtu vi. win.

An overview
The European dimension

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