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March 15, 1989 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-15

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Debate over

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 15, 1989-- Page 3

PIRGIM referendum

heats up

BY NOELLE SHADWICK
The annual campus debate over the
Public Interest Research Group in Michi-
gan's direct student funding continued yes-
terday when the group's opponents accused
PIRGIM members of placing posters over
their "vote no" fliers.
Jeff Johnson, a Conservative Coalition
candidate for a Michigan Student Assembly
seat, said he found PIRGIM signs pasted
over the group's anti-PIRGIM fliers
yesterday.
PIRGIM Board chair Jason Feingold
said, "I was out there today taking posters
(covering the opposition's) down. I'm sorry
it happened; it won't happen again."

Furthermore, he said advertisements for
the Michigan Review - a student publica-
tion which recently ran an editorial against
PIRGIM - had been placed over PIRGIM
posters.
The campaign war is the most recent
sign of the fight between opposition
groups to win support for their views of
the impending PIRGIM referendum.
The referendum, to be voted on next
week by the student body, would authorize
a $2 refundable student fee to go directly to
support PIRGIM, and would establish an
official student chapter of PIRGIM on
campus of which everyone paying the fee
would be considered a member.

If passed, the referendum would reinstate
the funding system, rejected by the student
body last year, that requires MSA to collect
the fee and direct it to PIRGIM unless a
student requests a refund.
PIRGIM's argument for the student fee
is that their on-campus activities have been
severely stifled by last year's loss of funds.
"We don't have any Ann Arbor-specific
programs now," said Andy Buchsbaum,
PIRGIM's program director.
Currently, Ann Arbor's PIRGIM group
is suing the City of Detroit for not releas-
ing information about toxic emissions into
the Detroit River. PIRGIM is also
supporting, with other groups, the Com-

prehensive Cleanup Act, and is writing a
report on the last Michigan Bell rate
change.
Opponents of the PIRGIM referendum
say that while PIRGIM is a legitimate stu-
dent group, it should not be entitled to di-
rect student funding to which other groups
are not entitled.
"PIRGIM ought go through the (MSA)
Budget Priorities Committee," said MSA
Rep. Robert Bell, the Students' Choice
party presidential candidate.
PIRGIM members say that by asking
MSA for funds, the group would only be
eligible for about $500, which is not nearly

enough to pay their attorneys' salaries for
lobbying.
Johnson, also a member of the Students
Against Forced Funds - an anti-PIRGIM
group recognized by MSA last night -
said students should not be forced to pay. a
fee for a group that supports only one side
of two-sided issues.
"No one group should have a right-to
come up to a student and say you either
give me your money or fill out this form,
he said. If PIRGIM can have a required f,
"then why shouldn't the College
Democrats?" Johnson said.
But Feingold replied, "Who's on the
other side of clean water or air?"

Party boss
claimed
Gorbachev
'glorified'
MOSCOW (AP) - In remarks
that cost him his job as Communist
party boss of Moscow, Boris Yeltsin
told a 1987 party meeting that faith
in Mikhail Gorbachev's reforms was
waning, according to a transcript re-
leased yesterday.
He also said the Soviet leader
had become the object of
intolerable" glorification.
The published report, issued by
the party, also contained more than
409 pages of scathing attacks on
Yeltsin by Gorbachev and other
leaders.
Yeltsin said that since Gor-
bachev took power as party general
secretary in 1985 and launched his
"perestroika" program of social and
economic reforms, the people's
mood has risen and fallen "like a
wave."
In response, Gorbachev invited
comments from the 300-plus Central
Committee members on Yeltsin's
speech.
Speaker after speaker blasted
Yeltsin, accusing him of political
immaturity. Ligachev took the floor
and called Yeltsin's remarks "pure
slander" that were "absolutely with-
out proof."
After more than three hours of
criticism, Yeltsin defended his claim
that Gorbachev was being glorified,
but added a clarification that this be-
lief was "from the soul but probably
not for the general good."

Cheney questions

militaryl
WASHINGTON (AP) - Defense
Secretary-designate Dick Cheney
cautioned yesterday against any U.S.
reductions in military strength in re-
sponse to changes in the Soviet
Union.
"It would be a great mistake to
reduce our own military capabilities
and lessen our defense posture," the
six-term Wyoming representative
told the committee.
Coming after a bitter Senate de-
bate over the Tower nomination, the
first day of consideration of Ch-
eney's nomination was marked by
strong words of praise, sentimental-
ity and indications of new biparti-
sanship.
The nomination of Cheney is a
big loss to Wyoming because he's
Wyoming's only representative.
However, this change would be a big
gain for America and a big gain to
the president he agreed to serve.
The panel is still awaiting letters
from the White House and Pentagon
counsels on Cheney's financial
record and FBI background, and his
position in the House of
Representatives will remain the
same until these checks are com-
plete.

reduction
Presently, the committee hasie-
ceived the requested tax returns. a
statement from Cheney's doctors aid
a completed committee question-
naire.
At the White House, press secre-
tary Marlin Fitzwater said they are
moving as fast as they can but cai-
not give a specific date pf comple-
tion.
Cheney said his top priorities for
the Defense Department would be
personnel changes, a general review
of strategy and the budget. He sup-
ports a defense budget that would be
approved for a two year period in-
stead of one year at a time, which
would build stability into the
weapons-buying process.
Questioned by Sen. John Warner
of Virginia, Cheney said he vas
once skeptical of the changes in 4ie
Soviet Union by Mikhail Gor-
bachev, who has shown a willing-
ness to negotiate.
Cheney believes that the Kremlin
leader thinks the "status quo 'is
unacceptable." However, the U'a.
should continue to pursue an
aggressive agenda on arms control
and not reduce its military commit-
ments in the eyes of Defense Secre-
tary-designate.

ROBIN LOZNAK/Dnly
CIassy reception
President James Duderstadt and his wife Ann pose with Zubin Mehta, conductor of the Israeli
Philharmonic Orchestra, and his wife Nancy, at a reception last night in Martha Cook dormitory after the
orchestra's sold-out performance at Hill Auditorium. Mrs. Mehta once lived in the dormitory.

Fri~eder
Continued fromPage 1
what I hear," ASU point guard
Tarence Wheeler said. "It will be a
good experience for myself and the
team. I attended a couple of Bill
Frieder basketball camps and we
know each other well."
Starting center Mark Becker

added, "I'm excited we have a new
coach. I know he has had success, so
he must be doing something right."
Michigan Senior Associate
Athletic Director Jack Weidenbach
and Athletic Director Bo Schem-
bechler were unavailable for com-
ment last night, and calls to
Frieder's home went unanswered.
Early reports suggest former
Michigan great and Atlanta Hawks
assistant coach Cazzie Russell will
be the Wolverines' next coach, but
Russell was unavailable for
comment.

Soonler or, later, everybody's ot to face the music.

THE

LIST

What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Speakers
"Free Will in Literature: Solzhen-
itsyn, Bilenkin, and Ayn Rand" -
Dr. Shoshana Knapp, Welker Rm.,
Michigan Union, 8 pm. U of M
Students of Objectivism sponsored.
"Values in the US and in Other
Cultures: Cultural Steretypes" -
International Center, Brown Bag
Series Discussion, 12 noon-1 pm.
"Improvement of Calcium Trans-
port in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum by
Exercise Training of Senescent
Rats" - Charlotte Tate, Ph.D.,
Baylor College of Medecine, 1033
Kellog Bldg., Sm. Aud., 12:10-1
pm.
"A Marriage of Convenience: Jews
and Magnates in the Polish-
Lithuanian Commonwealth" -
Murray Rosman, Lane Hall
Commons, 12:10 pm.
"The Last Two Hundred Years" -
Piotr S. Wandycz, Yale University,
250 Hutchins Hall, 8 pm.
"US Policy and Southern Africa"
- Panelists: Dr. Es'kia Mphahlele,
Dr. David Gordon, Dr. Ali A.
Mazrui, and Dr. Joyce Kirk;
Michigan Rm., School of Business
Administration, 4 pm.
"Trend-Free Run Orders of Mixed-
Level Fractional Factorial De-
signs" - Prof. Daniel Coster,
Purduee University, 451 Mason
Hall, 4 pm.
"Thermo Field Flow Fractiona-
tion" - David Slinkman, 1200
Chem., 4:10 pm.
"The Chemistry of Nitrosoalkene
or Nitroso Carbonyl Compounds"
- J. Schkeryantz, 1300 Chem., 4
pm.
Meetings
SWING - 122 S. Corridor E.
Quad, 6 pm. Workshop on date
and aquaintance rape to follow, 7-9
pm.
Indian & Pakistani-American
Students' Council - 2203
Michigan Union, 6:30 pm.

- Community Access, 2nd floor,
7-8:30 pm.
Internatinal Student Affairs
Committee - MSA Office
Michigan Union, 7:30 pm.
U of M Fencing Club - Sports
Coliseum, 6-8 pm.
U of M Taekwondo Club - 2275
CCRB, 6:30-8:15 pm. Beginners
Welcome.
U of M Shorin-Ryu Karate - 2275
CCRB, 8:15-9:15 pm. Beginners
welcome.
Anthropology Club 1st Meeting -
General Planning and Election of
Officers, 2021 LSA, 7 pm.
Women in Communications, Inc.
- 2050 Frieze, 5 pm.
National Association of Environ-
mental Professionals - 1046
Dana, 6 pm.
SIGMA Support Meeting - Dr.
John Hagen, 2228 SEB, 6-7 pm.
Furthermore
English Peer Counseling - 4000A
Michigan Union, 7-9 pm. Help
with papers and other English
related questions.
Peer Writing Tutors - 611
Church St. Computing Center, 7-
11 pm. ECB trained.
Northwalk - Sun-Thur, 9 pm-1
am. Call 763-WALK or stop by
3224 Bursley.
Safewalk - Sun-Thur, 8 pm-1:30
am; Fri-Sat, 8-11:30 pm. Call 936-
1000 or stop by 102 UGLi.
Performances
Latino Cultural Night - 236 W.
Engineering, 7-10 pm. Everyone is
invited to share art, poetry and
music.
Big Box of Nines/Artschool - At
the Beat, doors open at 9:30 pm.
Residence Hall Repertory Theatre
"On Your Mark, Get Set, Go--But
Where?" - Markley South Pit, 10
pm.
Michigras Battle of the Bands -
Musical Contest Featurina 8 local

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"SING'' is a contenporary musical Iove story set against a Brooklyn Name e
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the "SIN' contest quest ions below and you could win a SING" School Address
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'(ity____________ State Zip _______-
Grand Prize: S oy Sa_ e Zp__
Trip"fir tw to "the blaba. aat theS"n Club Eart for 5days 7nights. SchoolIPhone
P: Home Address __________ _Z_-
I ~~~~ine ~Innr it-er i r amipuswill receive a "SING Tshir; t ________ tl __ - Zp ________
1 The title song of SIN is sung by thisr ite mixr of the rock group. tarship Home Phone __Age-_
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I

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