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March 10, 1989 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-10

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I

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily-- Friday, March 10, 1989
Bash exposes local blues acts

i

BY JED THOMPSON
SIDESTREAM smoke, overpriced beers and nowhere
to sit down. Sound good? It did to 800 blues fans who
packed the Blind Pig to hear five Detroit blues bands
imported by Blues Factory booking agency last Octo-
ber. Five of the fastest blues fillies in Blues Factory's
stable got some much needed exposure; and 800 people
got a soul-healing dose of fine local blues.
It worked so well that Mark Forman, co-founder of
Blues Factory Records, decided to do it again tomorrow
night. Forman -started the company two years ago to
get some of the fine Detroit talent into the studio and
into the ears of cities besides Detroit. The company has
two records in its catalog to date: a compilation, and a
live album by the Butler Twins, who were featured in
the blues festival in October. Forman's insidious plan
is to book multi-act shows until enough people dis-
cover the music, and then get the bands rooms and al-
bums of their own. The plan goes into action tomor-
Tow at the Pig.
Five different bands will play over six hours. The
festival also showcases a variety of bands, from the
dancey R&B of the Alligators to the gritty sounds of a
man who goes by Harmonica Shah. Here's a rundown
of the scheduled bands, probably not in order.
The Alligators are billed as a "tight ensemble, two-
step kind of band." With a band leader named Anton
Thunderbird, they must be cool. Plenty of "R&B dance
boogie" should heat the Pig up to its normal 105 de-
grees.

Little Jr. Kannaday has been on the scene in Detroit
for more than 20 years. He'll bring the voice of
experience onto the stage, and don't let the doubly
diminutive handle fool you, he'll be ready to stomp.
Code Blue features a guitar player named Art
Littsey. Forman assures me that "if Freddie King were
alive today, Art Littsey would be his twin brother."
For the uninitiated, this is akin to making serious
weight comparisons to Marlon Brando. You don't toss
it around lightly.
Harmonica Shah hails from Summerville, Texas,
and, yes, that is a stage name. This delta harmonica
stylist often leaves the stage, taking his gritty
harmonica work into the crowd. Growly vocals and
lowdown harp work promised.
The headliner for the night is the Detroit Blues
Band. They were twice voted Best Blues Band (say it
three times fast) by the Metro Times, Detroit's scaled-
down version of the Village Voice. The band is led by
guitarist Jimmy McCarty, a veteran of the blues and
rock scene with very serious credentials. He's played
with Hendrix and the Detroit Wheels (Mitch Ryder's
band). He was also lead guitar for the Rockets, who
you may remember; they had a great cover of Fleet-
wood Mac's "Oh Well" and were a staple of AOR radio
before breaking up a few years ago.
Tix are seven bucks, and if you stay the whole six
hours your personal contribution to the band will be
less than minimum wage. What a bargain!

'

T HE BLIND PIG BLUES BASH will begin at 8 p.m.
at the Blind Pig this Saturday night. Tickets are $7.

Preg ones
Continued from Page 7
,production the children are asked to
participate and determine the ending.
- Pregones will present all of their

productions in Ann Arbor. The group
will perform in high schools, pris-
ons, and also travel to areas in De-
troit.

VOICES OF STEEL will
formed on Friday, March

be per-
10. MI-

GRANTS will be performed on Sat-
urday, March 11. Both productions
begin at 8 p.m. at the Trueblood
Theater. Tickets may be purchased at
the Michigan League Box Office and
at the door. General admission $5,
students $3. Pregones is also holding
a free workshop on Saturday from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. To sign up, leave a
message at the English Department
(764-6330) for Buzz Alexander. Be
sure to leave your name and phone
number.

CLASSIFIED ADS! Call 764-0557

Steve Lacy to play a masterful sax

EPIDEMIOLOGY
INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE SUMMER SESSION IN EPIDEMIOLOGY
(Formerly held at the University of Minnesota)
July 9-28, 1989
THREE WEEK COURSES: Fundamentals of Biostatistics, Microcomputer Applications in Epidemiology, Epidemiology of Infectious
Diseases, Epidemiology and Health Policy, Fundamentals of Epidemiology, Design and Conduct of Epidemiological Studies, Epidemiology
of Injuries, Nosocomial Epidemiology (2 parts): Hospital Epidemiology for Extended Care and Hospital Epidemiology, Pharmacoepidemi-
rology and Epidemiology of Iatrogenic Diseases.
ONE AND ONE-HALF WEEK COURSES: Occupational Epidemiology, Environmental Epidemiology, Epidemiology for Developing
Countries, Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases, Epidemiology of Cancer, Epidemiology of Aging, Principles and Methods of Case-
Control Studies.
ONE WEEK COURSES: Epidemiology of Mental Disorders, Introduction to Basic Concepts in Clinical Epidemiology, Clinical Trials:
Design and Conduct, Analysis of Clinical Trials, Genetics in Epidemiology, Nutritional Epidemiology, AIDS: A Public Health Crisis,
Perinatal Disorders, Promoting Health.
For application and information, contact Dr. David Schottenfeld, Professor and Chairman, Director, Graduate Summer Session in
Epidemiology, The University of Michigan, School of Public Health, 109 Observatory Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029; Telephone: (313)
764-5454.
The University of Michigan is a non-discriminatory/affirmative action institution.

BY MICHAEL TSCHIRHART
NEWCOMERS and longtime"listeners of jazz to-
gether will be glad to hear about a long overdue visitor.
Soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy makes his first ever
state appearance this Saturday.
Virtually a legendary jazz figure, Lacy boasts a ca-
reer that spans over three and a half decades and includes
more than 60 albums. His guest performances have in-
cluded recordings with jazz leaders Miles Davis and
Max Roach.
Beyond enduring and prolific, Lacy's music is
nothing if not authentic. Lacy developed the important
qualities of improvisation and experimentation at a
young age while playing with one of the artists who
attracted him to jazz, Thelonious Monk.

Accompanying Lacy is his five piece band. To-
gether for over 15 years, they have the reputation of
being one of the tightest and finest working today.
One of the main factors that has marked Lacy as
more of a trend-setter than follower is his instrument.
The sometimes awkward, always interesting soprano
saxophone may have no greater master in the industry
than Steve Lacy.

Eclipse Jazz presents STEVE LACY at the Ark Satur-
day night at 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.50.
Eclipse Jazz is also beginning a new feature, the JAZZ
JAM SESSION - after the opening set, the featured
band will take musical contributions from the audience.
Be at the U-Club this and every Sunday from 8 p.m. to
11 p.m.

*$400 CASHBACK!
NAYLOR CHRYSLER/PLYMOUTH
PRESENTS .. .
CHRYSLER'S GRADUATE LEASE OR BUY PROGRAM
*$400.00 on top of any other incentive already offered by Chrysler
Corporation. Now thru Dec 31st 1989.
IF YOU HAVE:
A College Degree (Now, or in the next four months.)
YOU DON'T NEED an established credit history
If you meet the above mentioned information, you will enjoy
automatic approval from Chrysler Credit Corporation.

Are
tired

you

sick

and
your

of

reading

cereal

box

every

:4
:'

morning?
Consider had humble beginnings as a cereal box slip cover. The theory
was to give people something more interesting to read while they ate
breakfast. A group of students, using this idea, created an issues
forum that covers both sides of a topic. Four years later, Consider
has become one of the University's leading publications.
If you haven't picked up an issue recently, here's what you've
been missing:
Can Ethics be Taught?
Can True Love be Found at U of M?

01PLIDUOII(Ox

117 \\P- -11 (D

Z

SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1989/5:00
RICK'S AMERICAN CAFE
Join The University of Michigan Panhellenic Association and
representatives from more than 20 sororities and fraternities as they
celebrate this spring's latest fashions from Ann Arbor's most exclusive
clothing stores, including:

What Should be the Role of the Penal

Are Test Preparation

Courses

Fair or

System?
Needed?

I
4
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Consider magazine is a non-profit issues forum published by U of M
students. We encourage reader participation by publishing your opinions
on topics, not ours. Each Monday during the school year you can
find a new issue of Consider at stands all over campus. If you have a
topic that you would like to write or read about, contact the
Consider office at 663-3148.

*American Eagle
*Jacobsons
*Bagpiper
*Redwood and Ross
*Mary Dibble
*Banana Republic

*President
*Ma rty's
*His Lady

Tuxedo

*Vintage to Vogue
*Four Seasons Formal
*Cat's Meow

Wear

*Bivouac

*Pa tricia

Miles

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