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March 09, 1989 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-09

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Page 10- The Michigan Daily

- Thursday, March 9, 1989

Tennis
team
nets first
victory

BY MARK KATZ
The Michigan women's tennis
team finally made a mark in the
victory column when they dominated
Toledo yesterday, 9-0, at the Track
and Tennis Building.
The win was the first this season
for the Wolverines, who upped their
record to 1-7. "At this point, we
really needed the win badly," said
fifth-year coach Elizabeth Ritt.
"After seven losses to start out the
season,today's win provided a big
boost for our confidence."
Sophomore Stacy Berg, Mich-
igan's number one seed in singles

and doubles, spearheaded the strong
performance with a convincing 6-2,
7-6 (7-3) win over the Rockets top-
seed Lisa Donnely. Also, along with
doubles partner Wendy Stross, Berg
triumphed over Toledo's first-team
doubles pair of Donnely and Lisa
Ambrosetti.
Stross competed for the first time
in both singles and doubles. She was
sidelined with an injury which kept
her from playing singles until after
spring break.
Ritt was extremely pleased with
the performance. "We really looked
sharp," she said. "Everyone played
well under the pressure. There were
some very close sets. Toledo really
gave us some good matches."
The second doubles team of Anna
Schork and Cathy Schmidt won, 6-
0, 6-3, and the third team of Amy
Maliki and Jennifer Lev won, 6-0, 6=
2. "They won some very important
matches very decisively. The (meets)
often come down to the doubles, and
their play really improved our
overall confidence," said Ritt.
The Wolverines face a team of
similar caliber of Toledo in their
next meet March 15, when they host
Bowling Green. "That match should
be similar to this one. It will give
us a chance to work on some things
we've been practicing in a match
situation."

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MEDICAL
SCHOOL
& DENTAL
SCHOOL
NIGHT

BY PETER ZELLEN
Diversity is the name of the game
around the University and, under the
Director of Women's Athletics,
Phyllis Ocker, that includes the
ascendance of women's athletics.
Before Ocker came to Michigan
in 1961, though, she had many
important and sometimes disheart-
ening experiences. She calls it her
"checkered past."
Ocker attended the University of
Washington where she majored in
physical education and obtained a
teaching certificate. "Sports were
limited to women then, since there
were no varsity women's teams,
only intramurals," says Ocker.
Upon graduation, Ocker taught
school in Washington before mov-
ing on to Smith College in Mass-
achusetts in order to work on her
Master's in physical education. Once
again she found no varsity women's
sports, so she coached the softball
team club.
IN 1961, Ocker joined Michigan
and has been here since. She tells of
the humble beginnings of women's
athletics in Ann Arbor. "We only
had three teams then, volleyball,
basketball and field hockey," ex-
plains Ocker. "But then Title 9
changed all that."
Title 9 was a landmark piece of
legislation in 1972 that said any
school receiving federal funds could
not discriminate on the basis of gen-
der, color, religion or any other such
factor. This created an opening in
schools for official women's teams.
In 1973, Michigan started with

Ocker leads women's program

six varsity women's teams and Ock-
er was there to see the merging of
the women's and men's athletic
departments.
From 1974 to 1978 she coached
field hockey and in 1978 she was
appointed the director of women's
athletics, a position where her
talents could be used to further im-
prove the status of women's sports.
THE BIG TEN finally formed a

Ocker. "She deserves a ton of credit,"
said women's basketball coach Bud
VanDeWege. "Under this new ad-
ministration she can play a bigger
role in the decision making process.
She's been extremely diligent and
patient and she deserves the chance.
The department should flourish."
One of the big changes will be
the unnamed arena that is being built
at the now defunct Matt Mann pool.
It will be for men's and women's
gymnastics, wrestling and women's
volleyball.
Many have applauded the new
facility, which should open its doors
for the Fall 1988 term.
"This has been really critical for
the volleyball program," says wo-
men's volleyball coach Joyce Davis.
"I've talked to Phyllis and she's
been aware of the problems we've
had in recruiting. This is something
that will solve it in the long run.
It's been a team effort but she's been
responsible on the ground level and
UP."
Ocker sees many more changes in
the future of women's athletics. "It's
socially better for women to par-
ticipate in sports now. Maybe now
women will look at coaching as a
career," predicts Ocker. "There are
lots of paths to take after athletics,
like sports medicine and marketing."
With more people like Phyllis
Ocker involved, the recognition and
success of women's athletics will
continue to improve.
II

UM, WAYNE, & MSU MEDICAL SCHOOL;
MSU OSTEOPATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL;
UM & U of DETROIT DENTAL SCHOOL
ADMISSIONS DEANS & STUDENTS HERE...
INFO ON ADMISSIONS, PREPARATION,
CAREERS AND MORE...
THURSDA Y, MARCH 9
7PM - 9PM
Angell Hall
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
A UNIT OF STUDENT SERVICES

Ocker

WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

conference for women's athletics in
1981. They now are beginning to
receive the recognition that they
have sought, in a struggle that has
spanned decades.
Many of her colleagues agree and
attribute much of this success to

4
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I I.
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I wasrft rubbin g
it in-I just wanted
Eddie to know
the score of
last night's g

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