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February 23, 1989 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-23

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Basketball
vs. Iowa
March 4, 1 p.m.
Crisler Arena

SPORTS

Wrestling
vs. Iowa State
Sunday, 1 p.m.
Crisler Arena

The Michigan Daily

Page 9

Thursday, February 23, 1989

'M' TRIES TO END SLUMP IN COLUMBUS

OSU is missing

JOSE JUAREZIDa y
Michigan's 126- pounder John Moore, demonstrating the form that has made him a contender to qualify.
for the NCAA tournament, looks to squeeze a dream from a Cyclone this Sunday.
Success is Moore sweet for wrestler

BY ADAM SCHRAGER
When Bill Murray in the movie
Stripes refers to an army without
leaders as a "foot without its big
toe," he is speaking of his Sergeant
Hulka. When this situation is
applied to the Ohio State (17-8
overall, 6-6 in the Big Ten)
basketball program, it deals directly
with Jay Burson.
Burson, the 6-foot senior Buckeye
guard, will miss tonight's home
game against Michigan (19-6, 7-5)
and every other game this season
after suffering a broken bone in his
neck last week against Iowa. The
injury has ended the college career of
the preseason All-Big Ten selection
prematurely, as well as puzzling the
now-big toeless Buckeyes.
"IN THE PAST we would look
to Jay to provide us with leadership
and support," said Ohio State head
coach Gary Williams, who saw his
team lose at Northwestern after
holding a 16-point lead with 9:09
remaining. "At Northwestern, Jay
wasn't there. We looked at each
other and no one took over. That
wouldn't have happened if Jay was
playing."
The person with the unenviable
task of replacing Burson is soph-
omore Eli Brewster. Brewster has yet
to display the characteristics of Bill
Murray's lead-by-example persona,
John Winger. In fact, in his first
start against the Wildcats, the former

BY STEVEN COHEN
As the college wrestling career of fichigan's John
Moore ends in the next few weeks, Moore can't help
but remember his childhood dreams.
Moore, a senior from Marshalltown, Iowa, began
wrestling in the second grade. It is easy to picture a
young Moore, obsessed with the sport, wrestling in
gym class, during recess, and through the summer.
Moore compiled a 33-1 record in his senior year of
high school, losing to current Iowa State All-
American Gary McCall in the state finals. On Sunday,
Moore may avenge that loss and much more when the
Cyclones come to Ann Arbor.
A Cyclone fan in his youth, Moore hoped to
wrestle for Iowa State. When ISU did not show much
interest in the high school All-American, Moore
chose to attend Michigan.
ISU'S DECISION was even more significant
because Moore's father sat on the board of directors of
the Cyclone wrestling club. But Moore has become
accustomed to being overlooked or underestimated, and
it only serves to motivate him.
"I like being the underdog," said Moore. "All the
pressure is on the rated guys. One guy I look up to is
Mike Amine. I think he's a perfect example of how
someone can (exceed expectations). Everyone has to
prove themselves, every time on the mat."
Like Amine, who was ranked 16th last season
before finishing second nationally, Moore would like

to make his mark at the NCAA championships in
Oklahoma City, March 16-18. Moore, a spectator at
several national tournaments as a child, has this last
chance to go as a participant.
"This is my fifteenth year wrestling, and in four
weeks it will all be over, " said Moore. "When all is
said and done I want it to be said that I gave it my all
because anything I save will be lost forever. I don't
want anyone to say that I didn't give it 100 percent."
SAID MICHIGAN coach Dale Bahr: "I think
when you get down to your senior year - kids go
either one of two ways. They start thinking of
graduating and their life after college or they really
start to go after their goals. John has continued to
work toward his goals."
This season, Moore wrestled to a 27-26-1 record.
This season, Moore has compiled a 20-13-2 record.
Moore is a prime contender to finish in the top four
at next week's conference championships which will
qualify him for the national tournament.
Many of Moore's losses this season came late in
matches when he is mentally and physically tired.
Moore, who this summer bench-pressed 305
pounds, is working on that problem. He runs six
miles a day to improve his endurance.
Considering how long Moore has been dreaming of
a successful NCAA performance, it's not difficult to
guess what he's thinking about on those long, boring,
solitary runs.

Ohio State will face Michigan
without star guard Jay Burson.
Proposition 48 victim of a year ago,
committed two key turnovers down
the stretch of the 70-69 loss in
Evanston.
"Eli has to learn to be tough all
game, which he wasn't against
Northwestern," said Williams. "He
was doing well as a substitute, but
it's different now. He can't just
come in and do it for five to ten
minutes, but he must do it for 25 to
30 minutes."
WHILE THE Buckeyes are

Burson
without Burson, who was the team
leader in both scoring (22.1 per
game) and assists (4.0 per game)
before his injury, they are fueled by':
new questions as to whether they
will be invited to the NCAA
tournament.
In addition to dropping games,
the Buckeyes have plummeted from
the polls since Burson's injury.
While that would seem to be good
news for Michigan, the Wolverines
will take nothing for granted.
"We have four games in nine
days," Michigan coach Bill Frieder
said after Sunday's loss at Indiana:
"We have to now concentrate on
Ohio State because they are a good
team. They are going to remember
how we beat them at our place."
FRIEDER WAS referring to the
99-73 nationally televised drubbing
Michigan gave Ohio State on
January 16. Atthat time, there was
some question as to whether Mich-
igan ran up the score by putting
their starters back in the game with
four minutes left and a 20-point lead.
It prompted Williams at the time to
say, "Our players have good
memories."
Michigan also has memories of
Ohio State, but they are not
particularly pleasant, especially at
St. John Arena, where they have lost
the past two seasons. The two teams
have split season series in the two
seasons that Williams has been head
coach.

;.
_;:,

MEN'S TENNIS
1. UCLA
2. Georgia (tie)
2. Stanford (tie)
4. USC
5. UC-Irvine
6. Kentucky
7. Texas
8. LSU
9. South Carolina
10. California
11. MICHIGAN

'M' IN THE POLLS

MEN'S SWIMMING
1. Texas
2. MICHIGAN
3. Southern Cal
4. UCLA
5. Stanford
6. Cal-Berkeley
7. Florida
8. Iowa
9. Arizona state
10. Nebraska

WRESTLING
1. Iowa
2. Oklahoma State
3, Arizona State
4. MICHIGAN
5. Penn State
6. Lock Haven
7. Wisconsin
8. Oklahoma
9. North Carolina
10. Iowa State

MEN'S GYMNASTICS
1. Ohio State
2. Illinois
3. UCLA
4. Minnesota
5. Houston Baptist
6. Arizona State
7. Penn State
8. Navy
9. Iowa
10. Stanford
1L MICHIGAN

I

Blue wrestlers want to blow away Cyclones

BY STEVEN COHEN
The Michigan wrestling team's
matchup with Iowa State pairs the
nation's fourth and tenth-ranked
teams. In addition to the top-notch
competition, Sunday's meet at
Crisler Arena has other factors which
should provide a memorable en-
counter.
"We're looking forward to come
out there," said Iowa State coach Jim
Gibbons. "I think Michigan has got
to be considered in the upper, upper
echelon. We have wrestled the best
teams in the country and this year
you would have to include Mich-
igan. It will be a fun dual."
EACH TEAM sports four All-
Americans. The Cyclones' 150-
pounder Tim Krieger and 190-
pounder Eric Voelker, both ranked
No.1 in their weight classes, will be
challenged by Michigan's Sam
Amine and Fritz Lehrke, respect-
ively.
Last season, Amine (7-2) nearly
pinned Krieger before bowing out.
This season, Amine hopes to reverse
the scenario.
After facing Voelker, Lehrke will

have met every wrestler in the top
eight nationally. Last week, Lehrke
lost narrow decisions to the nation's
No. 2 and No. 4 wrestlers. Sunday's
experience might pay dividends for
the redshirt sophomore at next
week's conference championships.
The Wolverines' two top-ranked
wrestlers, 134-pounder John Fisher

BUT THE INTRIGUE of the
dual meet does not stop there. Mich-
igan coach Dale Bahr, a national
champion for the Cyclones in 1968.
would like nothing more than to
defeat his alma mater and avenge last
season's loss. In 1988, the Cyclones
defeated Michigan after the Wol-
verines squandered a 15-8 lead.
In addition, the 18-2 Wolverines,
who travel to Mid-American
Conference member Central Mich-
igan on Saturday, will be looking to
add to their team's dual meet record.
A Wolverine victory against the 3-
11 Chippewas would leave Michigan
vying for its 20th win this season
against Iowa State, three more than
the 1984-85 squad's 17 dual meet
wins. Earlier this year the
Chippewas lost to Indiana 31-3, a
team the Wolverines defeated sound-
ly twice this season.
"I haven't really thought about (a
20 win season), " Michigan's 142-
pounder Larry Gotcher said. "To tell
you the truth, I don't think we
should have any losses. We should
have beaten Okie State and Penn
State."
EVIDENTLY, a team battling
for Big Ten and national champ-

ionships has little time to rest on its
laurels. But for the seniors on this
year's team - Fisher, Pantaleo,
126- pounder John Moore,167-
pounder Mike Amine, and 177-
pounder James Dye, the meet holds a
deeper significance, as it is the final
home meet of their careers.
Pantaleo, who faces a tough
match against sixth-ranked Steve
Hamilton, said: "It's bittersweet. It's
the end of a great dual-meet season
and also my career. It went really
quick. I'm going to be a little more
emotional about it during the meet. I
haven't done everything I came here
for yet, but it has been a great four
years."
Said Amine: "I don't know if I'm
going to get emotional or not but
I'll make sure I wrestle my best. I
just hope the people who have been
supporting us during these past few
years are there. It would be nice for
the team."
Dye added: "I'm not one to get
real sentimental before matches but
I'm sure it will motivate me. I've
been getting beat at home a lot
lately so I'd like to redeem myself."

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
YOUR F'IRST STEP
TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE YOU
COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. It'sexciting
anditmay beyourlastopportunitytograd-
uate with an Army Officer's commission.
A'M ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
-COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
-!- ' -
Find Cu4. Jore. Call Captain 0 Rkuvke.
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v'isi t 131 North Hall or Call 7F4-2400.
UAC/SOUNDSTAGE PRESENTS

_..

Dye
... final home meet

and 158-pounder Joe Pantaleo, also
face proven wrestlers. Fisher tangles
with Jeff Gibbons, a two-time All-
American, while Pantaleo will meet
sixth-ranked Steve Hamilton.

'

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