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February 21, 1989 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

____na__sARTS
The Michigan Daily _ _________Tuesday, February 21, 1989

Page 5

Traffic stalled by
problematic script

Dreams avoid the

'R' word

BY BETH COLQUITT
IN the Traffic of a Targeted City is
-a play which mixes present-day
New York characters and historical
voices from Hiroshima to inform
the audience about the tragic results
of a nuclear attack. It is supposed to
be unsettling. It is probably in-
tended to make one's jaw drop open
in horror. But, unfortunately, while
the show was upsetting, it did not
have the impact that it might have
had
The flawdoes not rest in the
acting itself; it is not outstanding,
but it gets the play's point across.
The main flaw is that it is not al-
ways clear who the speaker is; there
are only two actors in Traffic
(Diane Dowling and Arthur Strim-
ling), but each plays several parts
- including inhabitants of Hi-
roshima and a holocaust survivor.
Each "voice" of Hiroshima is listed
in the program, but there are times
when it is difficult to tell who is
speaking - a real survivor of Hi-
roshima, or Joanna, an anti-nuclear
activist and the play's protagonist.
There are several vivid scenes in
which survivors relate events before
and after the bomb fell. One of the
most poignant is the monologue of
a Japanese girl who was barely in-
jured in the blast, but whose blouse
disintegrated in her hands when she
went to wash it much later. The
girl's voice is initially calm, but
when she mentions her blouse
falling apart, she begins to sob.
A few times during the one-act
play the actors sing together. The
,singing detracts from the more
serious parts of the show, as it is
somewhat frivolous and not terribly
well-done. This problem also oc-
curs in the play's attempts at hu-

mor. The occasional joking be-
tween Jonah and Joanna simply
falls flat because it clashes with the
play's heavy subject matter.
One of the most interesting
techniques used was a brilliant flash
of all the white lights in the theater
to simulate the bright light accom-
panying a nuclear blast. This was
done several times, and there was
no mistaking what it was meant to
represent; it was powerful enough
to give a feel for the real thing.
Traffic could have been better if
some of the ambiguity and humor
had been left out. The actors did a
good job with a script that was not
quite strong enough. The play bor-

BY GREG iIAISE
TO us outsiders, the R.E.M. sound
is synonymous with Athens. But ask
some indigenous Athenians, and
they'll tell you that, although there
may be an R.E.M. sound, there
certainly isn't an Athens sound that
dominates every band that lives there.
Case in point: Dreams So Real.
Rough Night In Jericho, their lat-
est release and their first for Arista,
showcases the trio's musical strength
at playing loud AOR-type songs, of-
ten blended with folk-rock sounds and
lyrics that recall the Grapes of Wrath.
The album starts strong with its title
track, which introduces the urgently-
paced rhythm of bassist Trent Allen
and drummer Drew Worsham and the
admirable efforts of lead vocal-
ist/guitarist Barry Marler. As with
other tracks, the strong vocal har-
monies that have developed between
Marler and Allen appear in "Rough
Night In Jericho."
Also on the album are gentler
songs like "Distance," which seem-
ingly emulates Lloyd Cole, and
"Bearing Witness," which accentuates
the folky harmonies with a nice or-
gan. Most of the lyrics are about
crumbling relationships, and some-
times it gets really weak, like in
"California": "When California falls
in the sea/ That's when she said
she'll come back to me." The
annoying problem of lyrics recalls
the Grapes of Wrath: In both cases
you wish the singer would learn to
mumble like the murkiest Michael
Stipe in order to bury the often trite
lyrics.
Until recently, Dreams So Real
was an indie band, signed to Twin-
Tone. However, after appearing in
Athens, GA: Inside/Out in 1986,the
band received offers from several ma-
jor labels. After playing many
showcase shows in places ranging
from CBGB, where they played to
the entire executive staff of one label,
to a rented rehearsal studio, where
they played to three people (their
manager and the president and vice
president of another label), they
signed with Arista Records.
Dreams So Real formed in 1984,
after Marler met Allen and Worsham
(the two of whom have been playing
together since grade school) in an
Athens record store. While playing
clubs in the Athens area, they devel-
oped their power trio sound. They
also gathered a strong following, and
the band began to play venues all

Dreams So Real may be the latest combatants to leap from the Trojan Horse that is the Athenian music
scene, but they really don't have much in common with R.E.M. Except for being from the same city. Well,
and having an album produced by Peter Buck. But nothing else. Honest.

:
. .
k'
'

Arthur Strimling and Diane
Dowling confront the bomb in
In the Traffic of a Targeted City.
dered on being shocking, but each
intense scene was followed by one
that was more or less ordinary. It is
worth seeing if you don't expect
..too much of the concept.
IN THE TRAFFIC OF A TAR-
GETED CITY is playing at the
Performance Network February 23,
24, 25, and 26. Performances are
Thursday-Saturday night at 8
p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. and
6:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 in ad-
vance and $12.50 at the door.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

UMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY Earn
14000 + working for a sales and marketing
py.o College credit is available. Cur-
renifty seeking undergraduates for full-time
summer emplo ent. Build experience and
resume! Call 7'1-5680 for an interview.
THE RECREATION SERVICES DIVISION
of the Ann Arbor Public Schools is currently
szeeking volleyball officials for our 1989
Adult Spring Volleyball Program. Interested
pplicants must be at least 18 yrs. of age
provide own transportation and fulfill all
rining requirements. Previous officiating
experience is desired but not required. The
season begins 3/13 and runs through 4/29.
Interested applicants must apply in person at
the Ann Arbor Community Services Center
2800 Stoneschool Rd. between the hours of 8
=am and 4:30 pm. Deadline: 312 '89. Ann Ar-
bor Public Schools Affirmative Action/EOE.
THE RECREATION SERVICES DIVISION
of the Ann Arbor Public Schools is currently
seeking softball officials for our 1989 Adult
Spring Softball Program. Interested appli-
cants must be at least 18 yrs. of age, provide
'own transportation and fulfill all training re-
quirements. Previous officiating desired but
not required. The season begins 5/5 and runs
through the end of August. Interested apl-
cants must apply in person at the Ann Arbor
Community Services Center, 2800
Stoneschool Rd. between the hours of 8 am
and 4:30 pm. Deadline: 3/2 '89. Ann Arbor
Public Schools Affirmative Action/EOE.
STUDENTS
Look Into This
Telemarketing firm has openings. After-
noon & Evening Shifts. Conveniently
Located on Campus. Flexible hours.
$5.00/hr to start. Come See Us Now.
Mr. Thomas 996-8890

T'1'UDENTS - ARE YOU enrolled as a full-
time undergrad (12 o More hours LOOK-
ING FOR part-time work (up to 2 hours a
week) during school and full-time during va-
cations? C AN YOU meet certain income
criteria? WE HAVE openings for clerks
clerk-typists, and technicians. STARTINd
SALARY is $6.00 or $6.74 per hour de-
pendin on qualifications. Contact: Carol
Mick, Human Resources Office, U.S. Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, 2565 Ply-
mouth Road or hone 668;4220. The EPA is
an equal opportunity employer.
STUDENTS EARN MONEY
Dorm residents wanted for a study of peo-
les' reactions to news stories about issues
facing the university community and local
area. A $10 fee will be paid for a 1 hr. ses-
sion that involves reading news stories and
completing opinion questionnaires. Call 936-
1763 for information and an appointment.

over the Southeast.
Peter Buck of R.E.M. produced
Dreams So Real's first vinyl record-
ing, the single "Everywhere Girl"
from 1985, released on Coyote/Twin-
Tone. This psychedelic pop song
quickly became the best-selling sin-
gle in that label's history. Again
working with producer Buck, the
band released Father's House, their
1986 debut which featured muscular
yet melodic guitar and an abundance
of vocal harmonies.
The newest album was produced
by Bill Drescher, who has also
worked with the Bangles and Jules

Shear. The band admits that working
with Drescher might seem a little
strange when they might have
worked with Buck again or with
someone like Mitch Easter or Don
Dixon, but they feel that they gained
an advantage by having a producer
with a different perspective. Ex-
plained Marler, "We wanted to try
something different production-wise,

that would separate us from the gen-
eral sound coming out of our area."
Drescher captured the band's powerful
live sound, perhaps urging Georgia
Satellites rather than R.E.M. com-
parisons.

DREAMS SO REAL with
CROSSED WIRE will play,
at 10 p.m. at the Blind Pig.
are $12.50 in advance.

opener
tonight
Tickets

Spring Break Is Almost Here!
It's Time To Pamper Yourself...

I

I

Our specials start with a fresh
salad and end with a whole lot more!
Tuesday. Feast on a salad bar and barbequed chicken wingers.
Wednesday. Salad bar and some irresistible lasagna.
G Tflflrm Specials good until 9 p.m. Daily.
Chaileys No other discounts or coupons apply. Sorry, no carry outs.

Waxing:

Full Leg $40.50
Upper Leg $20.50
Lower Leg $25.50
Bikini $15.50

BUSINESS SERVICES
TOSHIBA LAPTOP For Sale: exc.
cond.,carrying case, software. best offer.call
Mike 665-8218.
LOVE SALES BUT HATE COMMISSION
ONLY?
Here's a chance to take a crack at sales & get
pd. a salary to do it. Work for reputable co.
with high integrity. On campus pt-time posi-
tion. 665-606X3.
CLASSIFIED ADSI
Call 764-0557

Bring in a friend
and get two manicures
for the price of one!
Only $10.50
P L A C E
HAIR & BODY SALON
2293 South Sate St.
663-9577
Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Saturday 9 am. -5p.m.

I

ti

'I

I I

Are you interested in
PROMOTIONS or MARKETING?
The Michigan Ensian Yearbook is looking for an energetic and
creative person to head a new promotional campaign. This po-
sition offers the opportunity to organize and implement your
own ideas. Great Experience if you want to enter the field. Paid
Position. For more information and to pick up an application
stop by The Michigan Ensian: 420 Maynard Street. All applica-
tions must be in by February 24,1989.
ENB IAlN

t s Your Last CHANCE BEFORE
SPRING BREAK TO
STOP STUDYIN AND START LAUGI-*
LAUGH' TRRCK
PRESENTS THE IHLAROUS COMEDY
OF LAUGH TRACK FAVORITE
LOWELL SANDERS
and StudmnCom.acb
OAYV GOU.D
SpectGusst
T>AHARROD
With Your Host
MKE TOWER
WDNESDAY
FEBJARY 22 _10001mU

Public Lecture: Dr Parker J. Palmer
"THE HIDDEN VALUES OF
TEACHING"
Tuesday, February 21, 1989 - 4:00pm
RPackham Amnith eatre

Soundstage
Starbound
College Bowl
Mini-courses
Homecoming
Michigras

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