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February 20, 1989 - Image 28

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-20

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16 U. THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

Dollars And Sense MARCH 1989

16 U. THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER Dollars And Sense E MARCH 1989

Homeless
Continued From Page 1
found the organization, whose opera-
tion Finkel calls "covert."
After the present occupant of a shel-
ter moves out, the building may be pas-
sed on to another person. Location and
availability are passed along via word of
mouth in the homeless community. The
lack of assessibility is vital to keeping
the cycle alive.
It is this secrecy that has caused the
group problems with the IRS. Although
the Mad Housers consider themselves a
nonprofit organization, the group was
denied tax-free status because it builds
homes on property that it doesn't own or
pay taxes on.
Although the shelters contain about
$250 worth of materials, the Mad
Housers are able to construct them for
less than $50. The group tears out walls
of buildings scheduled for renovation in
return for the materials they clear out of
the building.
Electricity, plumbing and insulation
are not provided, but "with a candle and
r, hody heat from the person inside the
shelter you won't freeze to death," said
Finkel. Plastic sheets compose the win-
dows, which are covered by wooden
flaps in the winter to hold in heat.
Vinzant
Continued From Page 14
They usually don't have a definite
job in mind after graduation; they
only know they want to be abroad.
They seek the glamorous life.
Compatible majors - Management,
political science.
Incompatible majors - Anything
mundane.
Fortune - You will travel, but as a
punishment you will have to actually
use your foreign language.
Psychology
Major traits - Introspective. Either
insightful or emotionally troubled.
They like to explain things.
Compatible majors - English,
sociology, anthropology.
Incompatible majors - Anything
unhumanistic.
Fortune - It's all up to you.
UIndependent
Major traits - Not easily pleased.
Quixotic. Perversive. Feel unique. Re-
bel without a cause.
Compatible majors - None.
Incompatible majors - Anything
Fortune - Possible long-term un-
employment.
Some majors, however, don't fall
into a categorization. Take pre-law
and pre-med, which defy the above
groupings. They are unabashed ambi-
tion. As the overly motivated section
of academia, they get extraordinary
grades which, in comination with
their imminent wealth, makes them
- annoying to the general population.
No matter how silly, unfounded or
stereotypical these categories are,
people still use them.
The administration seems to use
them to please majors who are pre-
dicted to make the most money, and
thus give back the most. For instance,
the English building at the U. of
Pennsylvania is poorly heated, old
and worn.
I think I might go back to wearing
birthstones.

Commandos
By Arnold Feldman
The Daily Pennsylvanian
U. of Pennsylvania
A car stops abruptly on a city street
and out jump what appear to be two
commandos.
No, it's not Philadelphia's version of
SWAT.
This is PHRAT, and the commandos
are students armed only with baloney-
and-cheese sandwiches.
The Philadelphia Hunger Relief Ac-
tion Team is a group of mainly fraterni-
ty and sorority members who practice
"commando-style food distribution" to
aid the city's homeless, according to the
group's president, Alpha Chi Rho mem-
berJosh Getzler.
PHRAT's purpose is to provide food to
the homeless every Sunday, he said.
PHRAT members also identify spots
concentrated with homeless people and
give out about 200 to 250 sandwiches
each week.
The preparations begin every Sunday

feeding the homeless
at the Phi Gamma Delta house, where thing, but you feel really bad about the
20 fraternity and sorority members problem, that there are all of these peo-
gather to make sandwiches in assembly ple out on the street who can't be helped
line fashion. with the resources that are allocated,"
A local restaurant donates baloney said PHRAT Treasurer Bill Geller.
and cheese while bread, fruit and other In the future, Getzler said he wants to
expenses are paid for with funds from a expand PHRAT and put it on sounder
$2,000 grant PHRAT received last year financial footing, saying, "We are trying
from a California foundation, "Mazon: A to expand within the fraternity system
Jewish Response to Hunger." and to independents as well."
Once, when the PHRAT car slowed The group also plans to form a non-
down, one homeless man spotted it and profit organization so it may secure
yelled, "Yo." Within seconds, a mob of more grants. The program may also be
homeless people surrounded the car, expanded to other Philadelphia uni-
jockeying for position so they could get a versity sites, Getzler added.
sandwich and an orange.
Joel Nied, a first-time PHRAT volun- Nursing the homeless .... A group of
teer, said he was overwhelmed. nursing students are spending their nights ina city
"I don't know where all those people homeless shelter in Fort Worth, Texas. Nursing
came from," he said during distribution. professor Linda Manks gavs hsstudentsa choice of
community pnojects to do; most chose ths shelter. I
"It was like famine relief. . . we ran out wanted the students to know the homeless have
of food within two minutes." faces and names," she said. The students, all reg-
Many of the volunteers, however, istered nurses, interview the homeless for potential
have mixed feelings about the impact of medical problems while the shelter feedsand houses
their work heSamuel Adams, The Shorthorn,
"Yhfeeir odU. of Texas, Arlingen
"You feel good that you've done some-

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