100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1989 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Men's Basketball
vs. Minnesota
Thursday, 8 p.m.
Crisler Arena
The Michigan Daily

SPORTS
Tuesday, Janua4ry 10. 1989

Men's Swimming
vs. Oakland University
Wednesday, 7 p.m.
Canham Natatorium

Page 7

Big Tei
BY ANDREW GOTTESMAN
College athletics will lose a vital component this
year when Wayne Duke steps down as Big Ten
commissioner.
"Any time
you're a commis-
sioner of anything,
it's difficult," said
Michigan Associ-
ate Athletic Direc-
tor Don Lund. U
"What you have to
do is satisfy 10
schools. He was .
always in the best
interest of the total
conference."
One way Duke ,
accomplished this
feat was with his
personableness.
"He usually relates
to people; he's a
wonderful man,"
said former Michi-
gan Athletic Direc-
tor Don Canham. Duke
"He's universally
popular. His great ...17 year mainstay
integrity has set an example for college sports."
The 60-year-old Iowa graduate, who stresses that
"integrity starts with the'individual," began his sports
administrative career on a national scale. A member of
the NCAA in its infant stages, Duke was especially

throne

to

lose

Duke

adept at working with the media and as a liaison with
the national TV networks.
THESE SKILLS particularly helped when he came
aboard as Big Ten commissioner in 1971, replacing the
late William R. Reed. Much of the S26-27 million in
revenue generated by the conference this year has come
from lucrative TV contracts orchcsuated by Duke.
Duke has also left his mark in the college basketball
arena. "As chairman of the NCAA basketball
tournament, I presided over the committee when it
evolved into an event which rivals the World Series and
Super Bowl."
Under his leadership, the tournament grew from 32 to
48 teams, and TV rights were given to CBS in a deal
which brings in excess of $57 million to the NCAA
each year.
Besides affecting the tournament, Duke altered the
look of post-season football. le felt an unlimited
number of conference teams should be able to compete
in bowl games as opposed to just the Big Ten's Rose
Bowl entry.
"SINCE 1975 when we did that, we've had 56
bowl appearances," Duke said. Nine different teams (all
except Northwestern) have participated in the Rose
Bowl since that time, earning millions of dollars and
helping bring competitive parity to the Big Ten.
Canham, who was on the conference bowl committee
at the time, admires Duke's actions during the policy
change. "The Rose Bowl people were very sensitive
about it, and Wayne made sure that we approached them
properly," Canham said. "Wayne, as I look back,
handled it right."
Many have felt, however, the change came only after
Michigan coach Bo Schembechlier lambasted Duke for

holding an election of Big Ten athletic directors to
decide whether Michigan or Ohio State should go to the
Rose Bowl in 1973. Both finished 10-0-1 and tied, 10-
10, but Ohio State won the vote.
Lund does not feel Duke necessarily deserved the
blame. "There was some politics involved, and I don't
think that was his fault," said Lund.
DESPITE DUKE'S insistence that Big Ten teams
be allowed to attend other bowls, the commitment to
the Rose Bowl has clearly been important to him.
"They call it the greatest marriage in college athletic
administration. We continue to receive $6.5 million
annually for the conference," he said. The contract will
be worth a total of $103 million by 1997.
In spite of all these millions, Duke realizes money is
still a problem for the conference. "One of the biggest
problems we have in higher education is a serious
financial crisis," Duke said. "Much of that burden often
times rests with the non-revenue sports."
Financial crises, though, have not stymied the
integration of women's athletics. Duke notes Phyllis
Howlett's 1982 hiring as an assistant commissioner as
one example of the conference's commitment.
"I think we have moved very emphatically in that
area," Duke said. "Much of our efforts are directed
towards promotion of women's activities."
BIG TEN policy changes for women seem to have
filtered down to the teams themselves. "They have been
so supportive of women right from the beginning," said
Michigan field hockey coach Karen Collins. "That has
kind of set the tone for other conferences."
Duke was only 34 when he became the commissioner
of the Big Eight in 1963. After 25 years, he is now the
senior commissioner in terms of years in office. Over

his 17 years with the Big Ten, he has worked with 43
different presidents and chancellors at the Big Ten
schools.
This figure accentuates that Duke is not merely an
athletic commissioner, but a component of an academic
institution. "You measure a conference by far more than
what happens on the football field on a Saturday
afternoon," he said. "We're in the education business.'"
Duke's views on current issues involving athletes and
academics reflect his priorities. "I consider participation
a privilege, not a right," he said of athletes with sub-par
grades.
THE CONTROVERSIAL Proposition 48, which
outlines minimum SAT or ACT scores for athletes, has
won Duke's support for this reason. "(It) is a step in the
right direction toward meeting one of our more serious
problems.
In fact, Duke favors a harsher rule: making first-year
students ineligible for competition. "I am opposed to
the Big Ten doing it unilaterally. I think if everyone
would do it, we'd be much better off."
Some critics have cited the Big Ten's disnmal
interconference record in recent year's as a sign that the
conference is on the decline. "Non-conference records are
cyclical. It's nothing to hit the panic button about,"
Duke said.
"(The Big Ten) will continue to maintain its premier
position academically and athletically," said Duke. "I
think the Big Ten has been America's premior
conference. We use that as a label, and I think it
continues to be so.

CLASSIFIED ADS

ROOMMATES

FEMALE to share one bdrm. apt. $250/mo.
or best offer. Jan-May. 930-0425 eves.
-GREAT LOCATION-GREAT PRICE-Cozy
W sublet in male double-$295/mo. inc.: room
. meals snacks, util., Indry. Avail. Jan.-May.
Call eorge at 761-1355 .996-5958.
Y HELP! NEED ROOMMATE for at. 3 min
walk to Union. Cheap! Call 995-372'.
"HELP. Lame room in house for rent 1018 E.
,Unvesit. an.My76-48
MALE TO SHARE one room apt. 7 min. to
.EECS Building--great price 769-7256.
NON-SMOKING HOUSEMATE NEEDED
to live with grad. stud. and professional. Call
eves. 994-5535 or leave message.
SINGLE ROOM in 3 bdrm. ap. Historical
home, corner ofDivision & Ann.,$254/mo.
Janie or Romy: 747-6894.

MUSICAL

12 STRING ACOUSTIC GUITAR. Case for
sale as well-call Jah at 995-0762.
FLUTE INSTRUCTION:- teacher with 3
colleges. ALL LEVELS. Saline: 429-1389.
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED: Female models for B&W test
shots with Denny O'Connor. Photo exeri-
ence needed. Call after 8:30pm. 517- 46-
2258.

Red Wings edge Habs
DETROIT (AP) - Dave Barr's goal early in the third period snapped a
2-2 tie and Detroit limited Montreal to six shots over the final 30 minutes
as the Red Wings earned a 3-2 victory last night, snapping the Canadiens'
nine-game winning streak.
With the score tied 2-2 early in the third period, John Chabot won a
faceoff in the Montreal end and worked tie puck to Petr Klima. Klima
hesitated, then fired a slapshot from the top of the faceoff circle that glanced
off Barr's skate and past the Canadiens goaltender Brian Hayward for Barr's
13th goal of the season.
The Canadiens opened the scoring on Shayne Corson's first-period
power-play goal and the lead held up until the teams combined for three
goals in a 5:36 span midway through the second period.
The Red Wings took advantage of a miscue by Hayward to tie the game
at 8:07. Hayward misplayed the puck behind his own net, Paul MacLean
slid a pass in front and Steve Yzerman dumped the puck into the vacant net
for his 39th goal.
Montreal needed just 1:37 to regain the lead. With Detroit defenseman
and ex-Wolverine John Blum serving a slashing penalty, Corson picked up a
rebound of Brent Gilchrist's shot in front of the Detroit goal bounced a shot
off the goalpost and past Red Wings goaltender Greg Stelan for his second
of the game.
Villanova upsets No. 4 Syracuse
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Kenny Wilson scored 20 points last night to
lead Villanova to a 75-73 victory over No. 4 Syracuse, the Orangemen's
second Big East loss in a week.
Wilson paced five Wildcats in double figures as Villanova, trailing by
two at halftime, built a nine-point lead in the second half and held on for the
hard-earned victory.
A three-pointer by Matt Roe gave Syracuse a 55-54 lead with 8:22 to go,
but Villanova's Doug West followed with a three-pointer of his own to give
the Wildcats a lead, 57-55, they never lost.
r Israeli Dancing
I Beginning Thursday, January12 I
I 7:30-10:00 pm at Hillel I
Join Leah Sadras for one hour of instruction
followed by an hour of open dancing. Beginners
and advanced are both welcome
for information call 769-0500
Millel does not necessarily endorse the Daily's opinions or agree with its editorial policies
Mld&

I

'I

* SCHOOL SUPPLIES
COMPLETESELECTION
* MICHIGAN SHOP
QUALITY CLOTHING AND
GIFTWARES AT AFFORDABLE
PRICES. CHOOSE FROM
HUNDREDS OF ITEMS
* SNACK SHOP
GROCERIES, SNACKS, SODA,
AND HEALTH AND BEAUTY AIDS.
*SPECIAL ORDERS
e~yT1T " -Tt r rq'C flt S A AT

-il Stree
Mass Meeting
Thursday, January 12, 7:00 pm
at Hillel, 1429 Hill Street
Join one of the hottest film co-ops on campus.
For more information, call Stephanie Klasky at 995-5161.
Hillel does not necessarily endorse the Daily's opinions or agree with its editorial policies.

I

ALU

4

Induldge your senses with an elegant
Sunday breakfast presented in your
home. For anniversaries, birthdays,
fraternity formals or to make any other
Sunday special. Call 761 -NBED (6233)
for reservations or gift certificates.
TICKETS
WANTED: U-M Basketball tickets. Blue tier
only. Call 668-6282.

ORDER ANY BO
PUBLISHER AT
I IMICHIGAN UNION BOOKSTORE

OK FROM ANY
NO EXTRA CHARGE.

CLOSE

CONVENIENT

CONGENIAL

Have you considered a career in
Healt'h9
How much do you know
about careers in: U

OPEN DAILY ALL SEMESTER
ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF THE MICHIGAN UNION

MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
f I ,

9:00 am
9:00 am
10:00 am
1200 pm

- 7:00 pm
- 5:00 pm
- 6:00 pm
- 6:00pm

You can learn more about the variety of career opportunities in the health sciences at Perspec-
tives on careers in Health. This program will help you identify professional opportunities
through an informal exchange with faculty, staff, and students from The University of Michigan
Health Science Programs (School of Public Health, School of Nursing, College of Pharmacy,
School of Dentistry, and the School of Medicine.) Please join us for Perspectives on Careers in
Health. All students are welcome to attend.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan