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February 17, 1989 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Prof.
i talks of
L modern
birth

The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 17, 1989--Page 3
Students report
racial slurs in
Stockwell

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BY SARAH SCHWEITZER
A visiting University professor
gave a feminist's view yesterday on
ethical dilemmas surrounding such
reproductive techniques as pre-natal
screening, surrogacy, and artificial
insemination.
Sandra Tangri, on leave from
Howard University, said feminists
believe women should have control
over their own bodies.

But she asked the 40-member
crowd at the Center for Continuing
Education of Women (CEW), "Can a
woman use her autonomy and sign
jaway her autonomy?" She said
ethical questions come into play
when women use their rights to give
pup control of their own children.
She said many new reproductive
techniques, such as surrogacy and
artificial insemination, have raised
ethical issues. Many feminists feel
that breeding children for a fee
allows women to become "wombs,"
rather than individuals, which
violates a basic feminist principle,
she said.
Many women are ambivalent
about new techniques like pre-natal
screening because they feel it makes
childbirth unnatural, she said.
"The motivation for women to
exercise control over their own
reproduction is not new as evidenced
by their use of abortion for many
years," Tangri said. 'But with the
new techniques, she said more
women are "not prepared to deal with
the implications of the new
technology," she said.
Many similar principles, such as
a woman's freedom to control her
own body and her right to informed
consent, which were previously
applied to the abortion argument, act
as a guide to determine the ethics of
techniques . like artificial
insemination, Tangri said.
Tangri received her doctoral degree
in social psychology from the
University in 1969 and is currently a
psychology professor at Howard
University. She has returned to Ann
Arbor to be the CEW's visiting
.scholar in Adult Development.
While at the CEW, Tangri will
continue to research sexual
harassment topics.
}1

BY MELISSA KARPF
A series of reported racial inci-
dents at Stockwell Residence Hall
culminated this week when an LSA
first-year student said she found the
racial slur "Nigger Bitch Don't Slam
Doors" on her door last Tuesday.
Since last semester, two Black
women living in Stockwell have re-
ported racial harassment by white
students.
Residents on the hall were ini-
tially planning to meet last night to
resolve the tensions, but the the
meeting was postponed until this
Sunday.
The students involved held an
"unofficial" meeting last night with
a member of the United Coalition
Against Racism and a Stockwell
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minority peer advisor.
The first-year student who said
she received the flier, said she does
not feel that these incidents have
been the product of racism.
"I feel that people on the hall are
not racist, but it's basically differ-
ences of culture, preconceived ideas
that have generated the situation,"
she said.
Although the first year-student
said she hopes to resolve these is-
sues at Sunday's meeting, further
action will be taken if necessary.
"If nothing comes out of the first
or second meeting, a complaint will
be filed and an investigation will be
carried out by the (University's) Af-
firmative Action Office," she said.

Tunes at noon
Tenor Ray Wade, accompanied by Susan Gray on the piano, delights a noon-time crowd at the Pendelton
Room in the Union. The entertainment was part of the "Music at Mid-day" program, featuring songs
ranging from "Down by the Sea" to "Your Lips are Wine."
Rev. Cofin to speak on
'human justice' movement

BY KRISTINE LALONDE
Those who hold set images of ministers and politi-
cal activists may be surprised by Rev. William Coffin,
who is a combination of both.
Coffin, who will speak 7:30 p.m. Sunday in the
Rackham Auditorium, is a 30-year veteran of both the
civil rights and peace movements and a minister in the
United Church of Christ.
"You ask anyone who was involved in the '60s
(peace movement) they'll know who Coffin is," said
Jackie Victor, a member of the Washtenaw County
SANE/FREEZE chapter. "He was a real integral part
of the anti-Vietnam movement and bringing the church
community into the movement."
In addition to Coffin's clerical duties, he is the na-
tional president of SANE/FREEZE, a grassroots nu-
clear disarmament organization.
Of his duties as both minister and activist, Coffin
told the Chicago Tribune, "Everyone needs a rich
prayer life. Your thinking may become too ideologi-
cal, too political without one, but to retreat from the
great issues of the day into personal piety is to deny
our humanity and abandon God's creation to the forces
of evil."
Coffin began his activism after serving in the army

during World War II as liaison officer to the French
and Russian armies, and after working for the Central
Intelligence Agency for three years.
After leaving the CIA and returning to the U.S.,
Coffin attended divinity school. In 1961, he became
involved in the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott,
spending three days in jail for his Freedom Rider
activities.
During the '60s he actively fought the Vietnam
war, mobilizing the church community in the move-
ment.
Linda West, executive director of Michigan
SANE/FREEZE, said Coffin does not separate his
various involvements but combines them into one
movement.
"It's not just a civil rights movement. It's not just
a peace movement. It's a human justice movement. He
represents that," she said.
Victor said many people may believe the peace
movement of the '60s is dead.
"(The peace movement) is often an issue that kind
of goes underground," she said. "Some people don't
know exactly what the peace movement is doing or
how large it is. This visit will be a way of drawing
attention to that," she said.

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'60s activist Ture to speak

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By JODY WEINBERG
Civil rights activist Qwame Ture,
formerly known as Stokely Carmi-
chael, will speak at Rackham tomor-
row.
Jocelyn Sargent, president of the
Minority Organization of Rackham,
speculated that Ture, originator of
the "Black Power" slogan, would
speak on civil rights and Pan-
Africanism.
The 7:00 p.m. event will be
sponsored by the Black Student

Union with the help of Sargent's
organization.
Ture has spent the last 15 years
in West Africa studying the African
liberation movement and Pan
Africanism with Sekou Ture, Presi-
dent of Guinea, and Kwame
Nkrumah, President of Ghana.
Carmichael helped organize the
Mississippi Summer of 1964, when
the Congress of Racial Equality be-
gan to have voter registration; the
Mississippi Freedom Democratic

Party, which challenged the regular
Mississippi Democratic Party and
won two seats to the Democratic
Convention in the sixties; and the
Lownes County Freedom Organiza-
tion - the only Black-led indepen-
dent party in the South in 1966.
Also in 1966, Carmichael was chair
of the Student Non-Violent Coordi-
nating Committee.
BSU President Chris Jones said
Ture received favorable response
when he spoke last year at Rackham
Amphitheatre.

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