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February 16, 1989 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-16

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 16, 1989

the non-white
W omen society." DeI
add a great dea
Continued from Page 7 production, toc
The director says his approach to ence that is imn
the play is uncommon. He explains, sion and film cd
"The dramatic action will be seen De Shields'2
through the discriminating eye of in the audienc
women who tell the truth, but are same "catharsis
not believed. Although the greater the play. He's
portion of the cast is white, some "When this sho
will be brown-washed to represent feel cheated t
Opener s
Continued from Page 7
themselves."
"It explores cultural tolerance."
"The choreography is mostly taken from the Key-
stone Cops. At least from the waist down."
"We are afraid to release the plot because we're afraid
of protests."
"Uniquely capitalist theatre."
"It opens with the use of a technique called

culture of Trojan
Shields also plans to
l of spectacle to the
compete for an audi-
imersed in the televi-
ulture.
aim is for the people
e to experience the
" as the characters in
confident they will:
w closes, people will
hat it didn't go on

longer," he says. "It's going to be a
drug. People are going to need their
Trojan Women fix."
THE TROJAN WOMEN will start
tonight and continue through Feb.
19 at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. Performances are at 8 p.m.
Feb. 16, 17, 18 and 2 p.m. on Sun-
day, Feb 19. Tickets are $5 with
student ID.

0

,4

' synesthesia' which was used in early symbolist and
Greek theatre. It explores the way in which a theatre
production can require a total use of all five senses in
the experience of a production."
The directors would like to dedicate this show to
Oliver North, Jim and Tammy Bakker, Pat Buchanan,
and to the memory of Andy Warhol - unfortunately
the show is longer than fifteen minutes, despite edito-
rial efforts - the man who made cans famous.
LIFE BEFORE CAN-OPENERS plays at S p.m.
tonight and tomorrow at the Arena Theatre on the first
floor of the Frieze Building. Admission is free.

6
0

I

Waves
Continued from Page 7
Broadway productions, its
entertaining exhibitions continue to
sell out venues across the country
- proof that Flashdance was not
just a passing fad, although the
ripped t-shirts are out.

And much like Flashdance,
Waves stands on a fine line between
acceptance as unrecognized talent
and rejection as garish, tacky fash-
ion by the art mainstream (none of
the Waves dancers work in a tool
and die shop, although Master Jay,
the rollerskating breakdancer, is a
plumber). Most of the Waves corps

and students hold jobs outside of
the studio awaiting the rewards that
come with fame. And apparently
they're on their way.
WAVES will appear at the Power
Center at 8 p.m. tonight. Tickets
will be on sale at the Michigan
Union Ticket office and all
Ticketmaster outlets

NOTHING TO DO TONIGHT?
COMETO
JAZZ NIGHT
LIVE BAND

1

0

0

A comedy about one nice guy who got pushed too far.

MUSS IPDDV rru [l kAITW n-~ A r i Crki PROUCJDI ADDV DDD7KIhlt &.._ALPU A GI IIKIM I

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