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February 10, 1989 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-10
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



IF

S

z nGARDENgs
Retaurant
Szechuan, Hunan & Peking Cuisine

DINE IN
COCKTAILS

CARRY OUT

DELIVERY
SUNDAY BUFFET

Open 7 days a week
Mon-Thurs: 11:30 am-10:00 pm Sat: 12:00 noon-11:00 pm
Fri: 11:30 am-11:00pm Sun:12:00 noon-10:00 pm
3035 Washtenaw, Ann Arbor
971-0970

DON'T LET THIS
HAPPEN TO YOUR
ALBUMS AND
CASSETTES!
BRING YOUR TURNTABLE
AND CASSETTE DECK TO OUR
FREE CLINIC
FEBRUARY 14,11 to 8
CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION

Charter the
DEARBORN TROLLEY
for special occasions
day or night.
*FUN*
*UNIQUE*
*CLASSY*
*AFFORDABLE*
Available Daily
Please Call 274-6300
THE ARK
Ann Arbors Acoustic Music
Club
-FOLK eBLUEGRASS
.JAZZ .WOMEN'S MUSIC
" CHILDREN'S CONCERTS
.ACOUSTIC BLUES
.NEW AGE .ETHNIC
Entertainment & Refreshments For All
Alcohol May be Purchased
By Members
DOORS OPEN 112 HOUR BEFORE
SHOWTIME
CALL FOR TICKET AND SCHEDULE INFO
761-1451
637 1/2 S. MAIN " ANN ARBOR
iUVER. ,
IRVCKCAFEl
673 FRANKLIN STREET
DETROIT
259-8202
presents
3rd ANNUAL BEACH
PARTY
with JERRY SPRAGUE
Thursday Feb. 16th
JERRY SPRAGUE
Wednesday March 22nd
SOUVENIR
Thursday March 23rd
*Watch for other acts in
Feb. & March yet to be
announced.
RMEN
-~ -

EXOTIC CHINESE CUISINE
Serving The Finest
Peking & Szechuan Style Dishes
10% off Carry Out
& Regular Dining
thru April 30
WO LOCATIONS
Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor 'LUNCH
665-3591 Mon-Fr 1130am-2 pm
49IJ Waniefaw ive. 1in i~uorDINNFER

Flint
Continued from Page 12
Sekelsky noted that even with
these problems, students take a
pragmatic approach. "Students don't
look at minority issues in a radical
way, they look at issues realisti-
cally. They attempt to work with the
administration instead of against
them."
Problems are also treated directly.
"If you have a problem, you have a
direct link through the Student Gov-
ernment Council (SGC)," Sekelsky
said. Unlike the Michigan Student
Assembly at Ann Arbor, the SGC
enjoys a "healthy" relationship with
the administration, according to
Chancellor Jones. The president of
the SGC sits in on the Chancellor's
cabinet.
Jones said he has witnessed some
racial slurs, such as graffiti, but
"because students don't stay here,
there is not as much tension. Like
the Diag here, two shanties protest-
ing apartheid in South Africa were
present on campus two years ago,
but because of rain and bad weather,
one day they were gone."
The student newspaper, The
Michigan Times, is published bi-
weekly. Robert King, the editor-in-
chief, said that even the paper's 10-
member staff gets along with the
administration and SGC. "In the big
triangle, where you would look for
conflicts between these three, they

all get along fine," King added.
Most people agreed that the two
major problems, parking and apathy,
are direct results of Flint being a
commuter campus. "On a commuter
campus, it's easy to see why people
don't have the time to commit,"
King said.
With school taking up eight
hours a day, and work occupying
another eight hours, most students
don't have the time or energy to
commit to extra-curricular activities.
According to Utley, "people at Flint
are just as motivated (as in Ann Ar-
bor) but they are doing different
things in different ways than here."
Sekelsky, however, has a "very
optimistic outlook for campus." She
explained that, in the past, once
people left the campus it was hard to
lure them back for activities and
meetings, but in "the last several
years there's been a change in re-
sponse." Popular activities have
been dollar movie nights, stand-up
comedy, and a lecture series on ev-
erything from Greenpeace to eating
disorders.
Most of the students come from
Flint or nearby towns. Admissions
director David James called Flint a
"regional 'U' " - his office recruits
students only within a 50 mile ra-
dius of the city. "There are about one
percent out-of-state students," he
said.
It only follows that the Flint
campus should have different admis-
sions standards than Ann Arbor.

T
3535 P

4905 Washtenaw Ave., Ann Arbor
434-7978
Present this ad

"We are perceived as elitist, but
not as bad as Ann Arbor," James
said. The school is not ambiguous
about what its admissions standards
are. According to an informational
brochure applicants are expected to
have a grade point average of at least
2.7. ACT or SAT tests are required,
but those scores are used only "for
advising and placement," and "not
admission, except in borderline
cases."
The campus "couldn't exist if we
had the same admission standards" as
Ann Arbor, he added.
In addition, Flint has a unique
'Challenge' program for those stu-
dents applying with lower GPAs.
Potential students attend a pre-col-
lege program over the summer. If
they make it through the intensive
program in "U' survival," they get
in. "The only person with no chance
(to attend U of M-Flint)," James
said, "is someone who totally
bombed in high school."
The profile of Flint students is
also out of the ordinary, in the eyes
of an Ann Arbor student. "It's a
different student body here than in
Ann Arbor," said Provost Wong,
who has worked on all three Univer-
sity campuses. The average age of an
undergraduate at Flint is 27.
Chancellor Jones said that the
, campus takes on an entirely
different appearance at 5 o'clock in

Mon-Tjhurs. 5 pm-9: 30 pm
Fri,.5 pm - I()
Sat. ZS pm-I0 tutipmJ
Sun. 2'(X) pi;

the afternoon, when "non-traditional"
students such as full-time workers
and mothers attend classes. Because
of the dual group of students, Jones
said it is "a challenge for the admin-
istration to create a vibrant student
life."
Adult students are "more prag-
matic in their approach to educa-
tion," said James. "They seem to ask
'how am I going to use this?'- it's
not as much knowledge for knowl-
edge's sake."
"Our students are very serious,"
Jones added, "they see education as a

way
A
teac
tang
didn
with
Fling
Ann
and
h
an e
beca
ing i

Members of Student Coalition, a g
student awareness on social issues

ib

IWREAN CUISIN
featuring
Wonderful Lunch Buffet
Monday-Saturday, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
$6.95
Dinner Buffet
Monday and Tuesday, 6-9 p.m.
$10.95
Buffet includes 4 main dishes, 3 appetizers,
and Kimchi and Kana's special salad and dessert.
Open Monday-Saturday, 11:30 a.m.- 9 p.m.
1133 E. Huron, Ann Arbor
662-9303
Authentic Hot Sauce & Kim Chee for sale
R E S.T A U R A N T

-I

< __E_

'202+-''

_.rAf '

I

Re~taurau~t
-Fine German and American food-
Imported and Local Beer.
_.Wine and Liquors.-
OpenGa ly11:00am 8 30 pm sunda I Iam 8 pm
120 W Washington * Downtown Ann Arbor * 662.0-,3
IM. Tired

Ais /40W
6/~ a

w

)ojio,- AJ ..

IJ&7" '

- ~ LL.Lf

(anI

Ks /

cr'

I

Serving Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner
COME IN FOR A LATE NIGHT SNACK OR MEAL
Variety of 50 sandwiches and many salads to choose
from.-also seafood and Italian specialties.
Quality food at affordable prices.

0

of the

Same Old
Crowd?

FRIDAYS-FISH
ALL YOU CAN EAT,
FLIM FLAM
(in Plymouth Road Mall)
C Plymouh Road
NORTH CAMPUS
m
U

& CHIPS
ONLY $3.50
Open 7 days
a week
Mon.-Sat.
6 a.m -10 p.m.
Sun., 7 a.m.-9 p.m.
We also offer take-out
2707 Plymouth Rd.
(In the Plymouth
Road. Mail)
994-3036

CF
00
a>
z
LL
U-

Unliverst
Towr
Furnished Apartments
536 S. Forest Ave
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
(313) 761-2680

f

m

Discover what these businesses
have to offer

U

WEEKEND/FEBRUARY 10,1989

. - I . ,.

: ., :,

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