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February 10, 1989 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-10

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 10, 1989 - Page 3

I I

'U'
in

sees small

drop:

new

applicants

..ar;

Peer universities
BY JODY WEINBERG bers of a
Like many colleges around the bers of p
nation, the University is receiving they we
fewer applicants, said a director of Swain sai
the admissions office. Swai
As of Feb. 3, the University re- ficial fo
ceived 15,100 applications, com- fewer ap
pared to about 16,000 last year, he Presentl
said. accepted
Donald Swain, associate director cants for
of admissions, attributed the decline So on th
to fewer students applying to col- not accep
leges, partly because not as many But m
students are graduating from high decreasi
school. the Univ
Fewer applicants, he said, are people a
"just giving it a shot," or randomly we're ha
applying, to the University, Swain Julie Mui
said. He added that students are more Studentf
selective in the number of schools to Committ
which they apply. don't wa
But Swain said tuition increases ronment
are not a primary reason for the de- them."
cline in the number of applicants MSA
because financial aid is available. mittee ch
Although the University has re- believe i
ceived fewer applications, the num- the risin

see similar declines

dmissions granted and num-
paid deposits are higher than
re at this time last year,
aid.
n said this may prove bene-
or the University because
pplicants will be rejected.
y, about 9,000 students are
d from about 19,000 appli-
an incoming class of 4,500
e average, 10,000 people are
pted each year.
nany student leaders said the
ng applications reflects on
versity itself. "I think many
are aware of the problems
ving," said LSA sophomore
array, chair of the Michigan
Assembly's Student Rights
:tee. "Minorities and women
ant to come into an envi-
t that is hostile towards
External Relations Com-
rair Zachary Kittrie said, "I
it can be directly attributed to
g cost of tuition, housing in

Ann Arbor, books. All of that con-
bined creates an economic barrier.
"I hope someone in the adminis-
tration is wondering if this is a
warning signal," he said.
The trend, though, is not unique
to the University. Many colleges
across the nation are reporting simi-
lar incidents.
Harvard University spokesperson
Peter Costa estimates a 5 to 10 per-
cent drop in applications compared
with a year ago, the first such de-
cline in at least two decades. Nearly
all other Ivy League schools are re
porting declines in that range.
Stanford University's fall appli-
cations have dropped about 6 per
cent, according to Lynne Madison,
assistant dean of undergraduate ad
missions.
At the University of California at'
Berkeley, applications are also down
for next fall's entering class.
The Associated Press contributed to
this report.

ROBIN LOZNAK/Daily
English lecturer Howard Schott discusses a paper with LSA sophomore Cathy Tseng.
Schott says his students affect his writing as much as they affect his.
Lecturer uses student
i deas to better class

BY MARION DAVIS
Think about the last time you
had to come up with a topic for an
argumentative essay, the hours
you spent finding supportive
facts, and the dawning sun filter-
ing into your room as you typed
the last page. Now think about
English lecturer Howard Schott,
who also pulls late nights to
complete assignments - which
his students critique.
When Schott wrote an argu-
mentative paper about the limita-
tions the grading system places on
students, he handed out copies to
his English 225 argumentative
writing class to critique. Noting
their suggestions, Schott will
bring in another rough draft of the
paper next week.
Why would a teacher go
through the hassle of writing an
essay for his students to critique,
taking their suggestions, and then
rewriting it?
Schott said writing for his
class is not only a way to gauge
how students have progressed as
critical writers, but it also shows
them it takes him just as much
time and energy - staying up
late, crumbling up balls of paper,
drinking pop after pop - to write
a good paper.

Schott said his rapport with
students is better when they know
he experiences the same things
they do.
"It's much easier for me to talk
to them and relate to them. I don't
want them to feel that I am unap-
proachable. I don't want them to
feel that I know everything," he
said.
Although he has been teaching
at the University for only two
years, Schott's teaching style has
changed since he started. Now he
is more interested in seeing stu-
dents outside of the classroom,
such as in the private meetings he
schedules with each one.
Schott said by talking privately
to students, he can hear what they
are interested in, what they think,
and how they feel.
"I learn from them. It's much
more of a two-way street," he
said.
LSA sophomore Piper Martin,
who was in Schott's 125 English
composition class and is now in
his 225 argumentative class said
she likes the relaxed class atmo-
sphere.
Martin also said she does not
get the feeling Schott is "teaching
at" her, but rather "learning with"
her, which makes the classroom

environment more comfortable.
Speaking of which, Schott
emphasizes making his classroom
a place where students feel com-
fortable enough to ask questions
and to say what is on their minds.
To create this atmosphere, stu-
dents sit in a circle. Schott said he
thinks the arrangement makes ev-
eryone feels part of the group and
not lost, which sometimes hap-
pens to students sitting in the
back of the room in the standard
row formation.
Student input is an essential
part of Schott's teaching style. He
encourages students to maintain
their individual writing style and
to evaluate information rather than
just memorizing it and conform-
ing to it.
But when the last backpack is
zipped and the final paper is laid
on his desk, Schott wants his
students to walk out knowing that
the course has been not only been
a help to them, but also a help to
him.
"I want them to leave knowing
that they have input and that there
are professors who learn from
them and listen to them," Schott
said.
"I don't know everything."
Final paper in. Ziiiiiip.

Several r

aside

thefts inAlc
Alc
BY VINCE WILK "He came in a
Residents of Alice Lloyd Hall re- around. He did
ported missing money, wallets, and telephone. When
jewelry last night. you?" he asked i
Several residents reported seeing a so's room. I sai
man around the fifth floor of several she said.
of Lloyd's houses at about 7:30 Other residen
p.m. last night. The man entered stories. In three
several rooms and allegedly took asked for specific
personal belongings. Another LSA
University housing security offi- said she was robl
cers later chased the suspect, but he wallet.
escaped. While in a nea
Two wallets, a watch, $180 in she heard voices'
cash and $7 in cash were reported (Residents) were
missing by different residents. ple being robbed.
A first-year student reported a and my bag and
stranger entering her room while she She had left her do
was on the telephone. Two weekso

nts report
Lloyd Ha
and started looking first-year student
n't see me on the cash stolen from h
I said, "Can I help was not there.
if this was so-and- A friend, looki
d no, and he left," covered the alleged
"He quickly asked
its reported similar guy's room. I said
cases the stranger the friend said.
people. Anyone with fu
first-year student about any similar
bed of her bag and contact Lt. Harold
Arbor Police at 99
arby room, she said

Ll

-I

said he had $8 in
is room when hey
ing for him, dis-
d thief in his room.
if this was some
I no, and he left,"

urther information
incidents should
Tinsey of the Ann
4-2878.

"and then a ruckus.
talking about peo-
I went to my room
wallet were gone."
oor unlocked.
ago, another LSA

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Karematsu
Continued from Page 1
many demanded that the 1944 case
involving him be overturned.
In 1983, the district courts va-
cated Karematsu's conviction. But
the 1944 Supreme Court decision to

allow for racial discrimination on the
basis of "compelling interest" is still
constitutional.
Although both Karematsu and
Gordon Hirabayashi, another Japan-
ese American who sued the gov-
ernment for his freedom, had their
convictions vacated, neither of these

cases can ever be brought to the
Supreme Court again.
But legally, the concept of com-
pelling interest is now obsolete. By
law it is impossible to bring an ap-
pealed case from lower levels to the
Supreme Court unless an appeal is
unsuccessful.

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'V ebruary 9-12
Ann Arbor - The Icart ofthe ArtsY
Take The Chill Out Of Winter
-Winter Fest Schedule-
Saturday, February 11
12PM Oser/Doyle, @ Bird of Paradise Morris Dancers, @ Tent
1PM Barton's, @ Art Association
Ann Arbor Repertory Theatre , @ Tent
Rick Rowe, Pianist, @Kings Keyboard
2PM O.J. Anderson, @ Gallery Von Glahn
Masked Puppet Theater, @Bird of/Paradise
A Night In Venice (Comic Opera Guild), @Michigan Theatre, $, 668-8397
Lace Demonstration (Golden Age Showcase), @Kerrytown
Brasswork 0 Nalli's
3PM Cassini Duo, @ Alice Simsar Gallery
Past in Person, @Bird of Paradise
Sirab, @Selo/Shevel
Tarten & Thistle Dancers, @ Tent
4PM Maxton Bay, @Le Minotaure Gallery
Cobblestone Dancers, @ Tent
Ann Arbor Cantata Singers, @ Gallery Von Glahn
4:30 Intrada @Art Association
6PM Performing Art Potluck (Young Peoples Theatre),@ Civic Theatre, $,996-3888
8PM Art of Baroque Dance (Ars Musica), @ 1st Congregational Church, $,
Mummenschanz,(University Musical Society), @Power Center, $, 764-2538
"On the Verge or the Geography of Yearning", @Performance Network, $,663-0681
Woyzeck, @ Civic Theatre, 662-9405
Our Town (St. Andrew's Players),@ St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, $,663-0518
A Night In Venice (Comic Opera Guild), @Michigan Theater, $, 668-8397
Lovers & Clowns (Papagena Opera Company), @Kerrytown Concert House, $, 769-7464
- Sunday, February 12-

BLUE RIBBON WINNER
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11AM Sirab Dancers, @ Tent
11:30 AM Cassini Ensemble @ Bird of Paradise
12 PM Blue Dragon Dance Theatre, 0 The Earle
Today's Brass, @ Washington Street Station
1PM Song Sisters Valentines Day Party, @ The Ark, $, 995-3731, 995-3155
2PM Mime Michael Lee,@ ArtAssociation
Lady Be Good, Nalli's
Dance of India,@Selo/Shevel
J. Parker Copley Dance Co.,@ The Earle
Art of Music Children's Concert (Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra), ®@Michigan Theater,
$, 668-8397

I

Order your college ring NOW.
Stop by and see a Jostens representative,
Wednesday, Feb. 8-thru Friday, Feb. 10,
11:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.,

-__mML- 0 1

i

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