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February 07, 1989 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-07

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 7, 1989 - Page 5

Environmentalists
cite policy problems

GOP to

BY BRADLEY KEYWELL
Two world-renowned environ-
mental activists harshly criticized
political leaders for neglecting urgent
environmental issues last night in a
packed Rackham Amphitheater.
"We did not inherit the world
from our fathers, we are borrowing it
from our children," said David
Brower, Director of the Sierra Club
for 17 years and considered the
"Grandfather of the Environmental
Movement."
"Improving reality - that is the
mission for tonight," said Brower,
summarizing the evening's theme.
Dave Foreman, co-founder of the
"Earth First!" movement, was intro-
duced as the "most radical
spokesperson of the environmental
movement." Foreman stressed that
Earth First! is not an organization,
but rather a movement dedicated to
extreme action-oriented environmen-
tal reforms.
Both speakers addressed global
warming, acid rain, the receding
ozone layer, and the increasing threat
to endangered species.
While Brower emphasized an ef-
fort to correct current problems,
Foreman proposed a complete re-

structuring of the existing environ-
ment.
"It is not enough to oppose the
construction of new dams. It is time
to free our shackled rivers and tear
down these concrete monstrosities,"
Foreman said.
Brower said governmental
economists have ignored the conse-
quences of environmental abuse.
"Economists have to put the cost of
the earth and the cost of the future in
their calculations."
Expressing an alternative view-
point, Foreman said "lobbying,
lawsuits, letter-writing and research
papers are important and necessary,
but they are not enough. Earth
Firsters also use confrontation,
guerilla theater, direct action and
civil disobedience to fight for wild
places and life processes."
Both speakers are currently tour-
ing colleges and universities across
the country. Brower recently partici-
pated in a national environmental
symposium moderated by ABC's
Ted Koppel.
Brower concluded his speech by
inviting members of the audience to
"join me at the bar" to continue dis-
cussing environmental issues.

petition for

school
LANSING (AP) - Senate
Republicans will begin a petition
drive to force the state to allocate 11
percent of its budget each year to
local schools, Senate Majority
Leader John Engler says in a
videotape released Monday.
The 25-minute tape, the
Republican's answer to Governor
James Blanchard's State of the State
message, lists school finance
charges, environmental protection
and drug abuse prevention as
legislative priorities for
Republicans.
"We can't make enough change
by using the legislative process
alone. It's too political. It's time to
go to the people again," Engler said.
Engler criticized Blanchard's
budget priorities, contending local
schools' share of the state budget fell
from more than 29 percent in 1971
to 7.4 percent now. He added
spending on prisons and welfare had

funds
increased from 27 percent to 40
percent of the state's budget.
Engler didn't give details of the
plan Senate Republicans will take to
the people, but he said it would hold
down local property taxes for the
schools.
Senate GOP spokesperson Debra
Townsend said the proposal would
be similar to a proposal made by
Senator Dan DeGrow, R-Port
Huron.
DeGrow's proposal calls for in-
creasing local shares of the state
budget to 11 percent in 1991, then
increasing it one percentage point
each year thereafter until it reached
15 percent in 1995.
The plan would mean $500 mil-
lion more for schools without a tax
increase, DeGrow said. The other ar-
eas of the state budget would have to
be frozen the first year to provide the
money for schools.
The petition drive will begin
around February 22, said Townsenl.

DAVID LUBLNER/Daily,
David Brower, ex-director of the Sierra Club, an environmen-
tal activist group, criticizes the government's stance on the
environment last night at the Rackham Amphitheater.

* Mardi Gras tourist killed

by robbers afi
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - The Mardi Gras celebra-
tion in New Orleans and elsewhere around the state
hits full swing today, with parades, music, and
partying. But tourists have been pouring into the city
for weeks now and not all have been lucky.
* A Mardi Gras tourist, who told robbers he had no
money, was fatally shot yesterday about two blocks
from a parade route, police said.
The victim Randy Robichaux, 37, a Baton Rouge,
was an employee in charge of running four dormitories
at Louisiana State University who came to New
Orleans to see the Bacchus parade Sunday night, police
said.
The shooting occurred a day before the Mardi Gras,
the culmination of pre-Lenten festivities. The city's
carnival parade began two weeks ago.
A companion told police that he and Robichaux
were about two blocks away from the parade route at

ter parade
about 1 a.m. when three men in a car and repeatedly
demanded money.
When Robichaux said he had no money he was shot
in the chest, according to police. Robichaux died later
at a hospital.
Police said the city's central business district is
heavily patrolled during Carnival, but that many peo-
ple put themselves in danger by parking in remote
parts of the area and walking back to their cars in the
early hours.
The shooting was not the only weekend violence
connected with the Carnival.
A month of parades and balls comes to an end at
midnight on Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday, when Carni-
val season ends and Lent brings six weeks of repen-
tance to this predominantly Catholic city.

Rediscover your heritage at
The Ivy League
Torah Study Program
Summer 5749
June 19th thru July 30th, 1989
Catskills, New York
Admitted students will receive full room and board
and $1,200 fellowship
Briefing Session Monday, February 20
On Campus Interviews Tuesday, February 21
The director of the Ivy League Study Program will be on campus
Tuesday, February 21 to interview students, both undergraduate and
graduate, for admission into the Program. Students who have a sincere
interest in exploring authentic Torah study and Jewish observance and
their contemporary relevance are candidates for the Program. The
Program is open to students who have minimal or absolutely no back-
ground in authentic Torah Learning and Observant Judaism.
Students admitted to the Program will be provided full room and
board and a $1,200 stipend.
Candidates are invited to sign up for individual interviews and
obtain Program information and applications by contacting Ane
Richter at the Offices of Career Planning & Placement, 3200 Student
Activities Bldg. - 313/763-1484. Additional information can be ob-
tained by calling the Program office at 718-735-0248 or 1-800-33-
NCFJE or by writing:
The Ivy League Torah Study Program
824 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York 11213
Sponsored by the National Committee for the Furtherance of Jewish Education.

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MICHIGANENSIAN
93 years of U-M history and college memories.

NOW IS THE TIME FOR ALL GOOD STUDENTS TO COME TO THE AID OF
THEIR YEARBOOK!
The Michiganenslan is looking for energetic, creative, and well-organized
people to be editors of the all-new 1990 yearbook.
Editors needed for sports, organizations, greeks, academics, retrospect,
and Michigan life sections.
Duties include assigning photos and stories, editing articles, designing layouts
in an attractive and coherent manner, and working extensively on Macintosh
computer.
Layout and managing editors needed as well.
Paid Positions.
There will be a mass meeting for all interested on
February 12 at 1:00 pm in the Michiganensian office, 420 Maynard.
For more info, call 764-0561.

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