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February 06, 1989 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-06

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 6, 1989-- Page 5

Chinese

students celebrate

New

Year

BY VERA SONGWE
Last night, more than 300 Chi-
nese students bid farewell to the Year
of the Dragon, and celebrated the ar-
rival of the new year, the Year of the
Snake.
For the first time, Chinese stu-
dents and their families from the
University of Michigan and Eastern
Michigan University united to cele-
brate the Chinese New Year's Eve
last night at the Michigan Union.
In China, the new year is deter-
mined by the rotation of the moon.
Specialists study the rotation of the
moon and make allowances for lost
or gained time in determining the
date of the new year, said Hui He,
president of the Chinese Student
Union in Michigan and a doctoral
candidate in Physics and Applied
Physics.
"It is a very complicated system;
the dates change every year," he said.
The Chinese New Year, also called

the Spring Festival, is the biggest
holiday in China, Hui said.

were trying to create a festive atmo-
sphere for Chinese students and fac-
ulty who could not go home and did
not have families around to celebrate
with.
"I have spoken to a lot of stu-
dents who are homesick and this
helps them come together and talk

about what is going on at home. I
think it is very important," said
Miao Zeng, a graduate student in
Physics and president of the Chinese
Student Union at EMU.
He continued, "It is definitely
more interesting back home, and I
am sure I would be have had more

fun," he said. This is Zeng's first
New Year away from home.
Highlights of the celebration in-
cluded Chinese folk dancing, per-
formers dressed in kimonas and
waving fans, folk comedy, and a
violin performance by six children
between the ages of five and 10.

The celebration was coordinated
entirely by students. They raised
money by selling Chinese
newsletters and receiving donations
from members of the community.
Many of the young children
received gifts from friends and family
members, a tradition of the Chinese
New Year.

In China, the new year
is determined by the rota-
tion of the moon. They
have specialists who study
the rotation of the moon
and make allowances for
lost or gained time in de-
termining the date of the
new year.
-Hui He, University
doctoral student

Chinese police shut down art exhlbit

BEIJING (AP) - Police shut
down the largest exhibition of avant-
garde art in Communist China's
history Saturday, the day it opened,
after artists defied a ban on perfor-
mance art and a sculptor shot her
work with a BB gun.
Early yesterday, the official Xin-
hua News Agency said the woman
had been detained and that she and a
man were held on suspicion of dis-
turbing public order.
As police closed the show shortly
before noon, hundreds of spectators
and artists spilled into the courtyard

in front of the China Art Gallery.
At one point, two carloads of riot
police, wearing helmets and toting
automatic weapons and tear gas can-
isters, drove into the crowd. They
left immediately after their cars were
surrounded by curious onlookers.
"That must be performance art,
too," said one artist.
Several artists accused the Public
Security Bureau of using the shoot-
ing incident as an excuse to shut the
exhibition, which was approved by
the government after three years of
debate.

"We have given them the justifi-
cation they need to shut us down,"
said Su Ligin, an artist in the show,
"This is a sad day for art in China."
The exhibition of more than 250
works, covering three floors of the
gallery, included sculpture, pen-and-
ink drawing, video art and oil paint-
ing. Artists came from all over
China.
The show began on a somber
note. In the center of the gallery's
main hall, organizers had constructed
a black coffin, on top of which was
written, "This exhibition is in honor

of all Chinese artists who gave their
lives for modem art."
The last performance came
shortly before noon, when a man and
woman entered the hall and stood in
front of the woman's sculpture, a,
phone booth. Exhibition officials
said that the man handed her a BB
gun. She fired two pellets into the
phone booth and fled.
A friend of the artist said she shot
her work "because she wanted to
show her complete negation of
modern Chinese culture,"

Today there are about
nese visiting professors
graduate students, said Hui.

100 Chi-
and 200

He continued by saying that they

Lecture focuses
eon sex, drugs,
and decisions

By DIANE COOK
It's their second date. They em-
brace. They kiss. And then he stops.
He says they should know more
about each other's sexual history. He
confesses that he has herpes.
Then the man and woman look
out into an audience of University
students who ask them questions
about their thoughts, concerns, and
relationship.
The man and woman are actors,
part of the "Talk To Us" troupe
which performs skits to spark dis-
cussion about social issues and prej-
udice in society.
Yesterday's discussion focused on
the relationship between sexually
transmitted diseases and alcohol
consumption. The lecture entitled,
"Sex, Drugs, and Decision Making,"
was sponsored by University Health
Services at West Quad.
"Information tells us that people

are contracting STD's (sexually
transmitted diseases) and abusing al-
cohol and other drugs," said Teresa
Herzog, substance abuse coordinator
at the University Health Services.
Alcohol impairs judgement and
decision making ability that often
leads to having sex without using
condoms, said Herzog. She said sex-
ual partners should communicate and
practice safe sex.
After the performance, a panel of
health experts answered questions
that were submitted anonymously by
students.
Panelists Dr. Sylvia Hacker, a
professor in the School of Public
Health, Pamela Horne, assistant di-
rector of student information ser-
vices, and Dr. Caesar Briefer, director
of the University Health Services
answered questions concerning the
prevention and treatment of sexually
transmitted diseases.

JOHN WEISE/DW
Winter Wonderland
While strolling through the Diag, a passerby arms himself with an umbrella against snow flakes yesterday afternoon.

71

*Report says supremacist
movement is still alive

WRDIDE EMPLOYMENTg IIbd~ D

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) -
Young "skinheads" revived the white
supremacist movement in America
last year, according to a new report
that says old-guard racists are orga-
nizing the violent teen gangs into a
* national network.
"Not since the height of Klan ac-
tivity during the civil rights era has
there been a white supremacist group
so obsessed with violence or so
reckless in its disregard for the law,"
says the report by Klanwatch, which
monitors white supremacist activi-
ties nationwide for the Southern
Poverty Law Center.
The report, issued today by
Klanwatch director Pat Clark, says
victims of skinhead violence last
year included Blacks, homosexuals,
Jews, Asians, Hispanics, and Indi-
ans, and that the racist gangs
"represent a unique and frightening
phenomenon in the history of white
supremacism in America."
"Begun as spontaneous teen
gangs, they are now being organized
into a national network by older
white supremacists such as Tom

Metzger of the White Aryan resis-
tance and Richard Butler of the
Aryan Nations," Clark said.
The report gives a representative
sample of hate crimes during 1988,
including 193 incidents in 35 states.
Among those:
A A Black church in a predomi-
nantly white area in southern Illinois
was set afire in April, rebuilt by the
community, and then burned to the
ground in October. A skinhead was
arrested.
" In New York City, neighbor-
hood youths destroyed the inside of a
synagogue in September.
The report also cited a growing
college recruitment campaign by
white supremacist groups.
Sarah Bullard, research director for
Klanwatch, said the turnout of about
400 Klan members and skinheads at
a white supremacist march in Pu-
laski, Tenn., on Jan. 14 was further
evidence of a growing white
supremacist following.
The turnout was up considerably
from about 60 people in 1987 and
about 150 the previous year.

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3

Congress to vote
on pay raise

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WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS,
W.Va (AP) - House Democrats
tried to buck up their courage
yesterday as they wrapped up a
weekend retreat and looked toward
Capitol Hill battles over a proposed
51 percent pay raise.
Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., ap-
pearing on CBS' "Face the Nation,"
reminded the television audience four
times that it was Former President
O Reagan who proposed raising con-
ar -..-.a eal ip f.:a rnm 4Y QO CM Itr%

"I would like this execution to be
swift. I don't want to bleed to
death," said Rep. Dick Durbin, D-
Ill., adding that 75 percent of his
constituents said in a survey they
would consider the pay raise a major
issue in the next election.
On "Face the Nation," Sen. Gor-
don Humphrey, R-N.H., said, "This
pay raise is an affront to the Ameri-
can people, both with respect to the
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