100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 03, 1989 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-03
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



70

I

0

0

BETTER THAN THE BATHROOM WALLS!
C> '.'>~''Give your message a
VU(DPerTouch.....
'~~idfott utI baitWPersonals

n ail

Read
ad
WLe

Student

remembers

Syracuse-abroad program
participant reflects on tragedy

Pseudo-mintel lectuali
rock? Reed must cl

WASlINGTON
- /
663-0070
114 E. WASHINGTON

Bring in this cartoon and get 2 for 1 on ALL bar food after 10:00 p.m.
PLUS downtown's BEST HAPPY HOUR. Reduced drink prices-
EVERYDAY-from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., and 10:00 p.m. to close.
DRAFT BEER $1.00, HOUSE WINE $1.50, HOUSE DRINKS $1.50
LUNCH * DINNER * LATE NIGHT BAR MENU
PASS sports in the lounge.

FINAL WINTER MARK-DOWNS

50-

OFF

By Eileen Berg
Lucky - a term that can be ap-
plied to lottery winners, your
roommate who landed that great job,
or people who find money in the
street. Or the other "lucky"- the
only survivor in a car crash, an or-
gan transplant which came through
at the last minute, or the person who
missed a plane which crashed.
John Perry is the second kind of
lucky, the kind that saved his life.
Perry was supposed to fly home
with his best friend Ken from Lon-
don on December 21, but changed
his flight to two days earlier, be-
cause he found out the University's
Christmas break was shorter than he
expected and he wanted more time to
relax before school started again. He
was homesick, and tired of traveling.
Perry felt guilty, because the day he
was leaving was Ken's 21st birth-
day, but he and Ken decided they
would celebrate the birthday on New
Year's Eve with a bottle of 40-year
old malt scotch. They would toast
their semester on the Syracuse pro-
gram in London, the new year, and
their friendship.
On Dec. 19, 1988, Pan American
Flight 103 left Frankfurt, West
Germany, made its regularly-sched-
uled stop in London, and landed
safely at Kennedy International Air-
port in New York. About 9:30 p.m.
John Perry, 21, of Livingston, N.J.,
hugged his parents for the first time
since September.
Two days later, Pan American
Flight 103 again began its journey
to New York. In London, Ken Bis-
sett, 21, of Hartsdale, N.Y., boarded
the plane. While at home, his
mother planned to surprise her son
with a birthday cake at the airport.
Flight 103 blew up about 7 p.m.,
31,000 feet over the small village of
Lockerbie, Scotland. There were 259
passengers on board, and all were
killed in the crash. This time there
were no arrivals. It was the worst
recorded air disaster in British his-
tory.
Perry, a senior concentrating in
General Studies, decided to go on the
Syracuse program - a semester of
classes at an extension of Syracuse
University in London - because he
wanted to meet people, travel and get
a break from the University. After
three years, he was bored with
school and Ann Arbor. If he had
been asked about his semester abroad
when he stepped off the plane, Perry
would have said he just completed
the best experience of his life. Two
days later he would have to think
twice before answering.
Thirty-eight students from the
Syracuse program were aboard Flight
103 on December 21. Perry knew

about half of them, including his
two roommates, Ken Bissett and
Tim Cardwell. Eight others lived in
his apartment building. Later,
studying a photograph taken a few
nights before he left at the Hard
Rock Cafe, John realized that almost
all the people in the photograph
were dead.
"It's still hard for me to compre-
hend I'm never going to see these
people again. Especially with my
two roommates - I still think
about Ken everyday. I didn't like
going to sleep for the first week after
it happened, because I was waking
up in the middle of the night. I had
nightmares about voices of Ken's
friends... people I didn't even
know... just asking me questions
about him, what happened to him."
Perry leans his 6-foot frame back
in his chair in an upstairs room at
Dominicks'. The midday sunlight
catches the highlights in his brown
hair, and his deep blue eyes, unwa-
vering and stoic, look forward as he
talks. He seems to choose his words
from lists in his head and frequently
'I was a wreck. I couldn't
stop crying and I couldn't
stop thinking that I should
have been on that plane.'
stops as if he's carefully putting
each sentence together before actu-
ally saying it. His voice, steady and
strong, echoes in the wooden paneled
room, filling the area with soft vi-
brations. He's in control, but when
he first heard about the disaster, he
wasn't.
"I was a wreck. I couldn't stop
crying and I couldn't stop thinking
that I should have been on that
plane. Not that I felt guilty, but just
how close I came to dying."
Perry became anxious to change
his travel plans about a week before
he was originally supposed to leave,
when he found out another room-
mate cancelled his Austrian ski trip
to go home early.
"That night I couldn't sleep. I
remember lying in bed thinking
about it for two or three hours...
until I finally fell asleep from ex-
haustion," he said.
The next morning at 8 a.m. he
went to the Pan American office and
switched from the ill-fated December
21 flight to December 19.
Although he's outwardly com-
posed and almost too calm, Perry
says he is still troubled by the weeks
leading upto the crash. He says he
and a friend had been joking about
the series of bad luck Ken had

Snow falls is
Brian Keane
Snowfalls
Flying Fish Records
Snowfalls is a collection of nine
pieces performed solo by New Age
guitar wiz Brian Keane on his 6 and
twelve string guitars. Each cut is a
virtuosic display, simultaneously
using bass lines, melodies and
counterpoints all intertwined to cre-
ate a whole. Considering all the cuts
were recorded live and alone, with no
overdubs, his playing prowess is all
the more impressive. However,
Snowfalls is difficult to listen to
actively. It's fine as background,
"atmospheric" music (great to study
to, not distracting at all), but it's
difficult to pay attention to. The al-
bum is just non-stop noodling,
which isn't interesting, no matter
Martha
Continued from Page 4
"Heatwave", "Quicksand", "Nowhere
To Run", "Jimmy Mack", and
"Dancing In The Street". In 1968,
they achieved the ultimate accolade
of being namechecked in a Velvet
Underground song, "Inside Your
Heart"
However, things started going
awry in 1967, when Reeves, appar-
ently, became 'troublesome', de-
manding more artistic autonomy.
Like other Motown defectors, she
voiced concerns over the creative
straitjacket Berry Gordy kept on
much of the label's talent. The
group disbanded and Reeves' life
took a turn for the worse. She suf-
fered years of depression, alcoholism
and two broken marriages before
making the proverbial 'comeback'.
Reeves now lives in Detroit and
plays gigs in the immediate area, as
well as making regular tours of
England. She's busier and happier
today than at any other time since
she left the Motown family.
Tomorrow night, I just hope
Reeves makes use of her gospel
training and sings her soul out. Soul
singers don't age, they just get bet-
ter. So Martha, please spare us the
medleys and let's have some funky,
uptown r(h)apsodizing.

Lou Reed
New York
Sire Records
Try hard not to swallow your
tongue reading Lou Reed's message
on the back of the record jacket. "It's
meant to be listened to in one 58
minute (14 songs!) sitting," he
instructs, "as though it were a book
or a movie."
The thing is, New York ain't no
novel. It's a rock 'n' roll album. It
contains a few great cuts, a few near
misses, and a couple of stinkers.

Any narrative unity that Professor
Reed was trying to imbue in this,
his piece d' resistance, is lost on this
bystander. The arrogance of the
claim that he makes to literary
significance could only be surpassed
by, say, putting five pictures of
himself on the album cover.
"Halloween Parade (Aids)" and
"Xmas in February" should go down
as two causes for quiet celebration
on the record. But for every tune
which reminds you that Reed is one
of the most honest and clear-headed

mood music
how impressive the technique may
be. It's difficult to differentiate the
cuts; they could have been called
"Noodle One," "Noodle Two," etc.
Snowfalls is very nice, and techni-
cally very well performed, but also
very boring. Like most New Age
music, I guess.. -Chuck Skarsaune
° L I

songs
laugha
believ
none o
what r
to me
turn t
one)
hummn
all his
growi
boys'
comn
overre

ALL WOOL SWEATERS ............50-75% OFF
ALL LEATHER JACKETS . ......50% OFF
ALL PARKAS .....4........4...............40-50% OFF
ALL GLOVES ~.........................................2-0 F
A SC ARV ES................................ ................. .... 50% O FF
ALL CROSS COUNTRY SKIS...............................40% OFF
ALL PATAGONIA & WOOLRICH FLANNELS.... .40% OFF
PATAGONIA SHELLED SYNCHILLA....................20% OFF
761-6207 " 330 & 336 S. STATE * OPEN SUNDAY 12-4:30

Portfolio
Photography Precision Phc
( U' The Full-Servi

83(
Al
110

UB ATINE$30 FAIRSTHU AFTtENN HWONLY
SUNM. ThNOU N FRI. AtON IAYS. SAT. UNTIL 6:00PM
TUESDAY BARGAIN DAY $2.00 ALL SHOWS
CON. SHOWS SAT. SUN. I tHOtS. ILATE SHOWS FRI. & SAT.
TIMES SHOWN ARE FOR TODAY ONLY
WHO'S HARRY CRUMB? -
12:25. 2:3,4:30, 7:30, 9:30, 11:30
HER ALIBI
1:25, 3:20, 5:15, 7:35, 9:50, 11:40
SOME GIRLS
FRf 12:00
THREE FUGITIVES -
12:40, 2:45, 4:55, 7:25, 9:35, 11:35
PHYSICAL EVIDENCE
1:00, 3:05, 5:05, 7:30, 9:40
DANGEROUS LIAISONS E
12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:55, 12:10
I BEACHES
12:30 2:50,5 5BC7:35, 9:55 12:05
SMISSISSIPPIBURNING
L1:20, 4:00,7:20,9:45, 1210,
THE ACCIDENTAL TOURIST
12:15,2:30,4:45,7:20,9:30,11:40 [M
[as WORKING GIRL
2:50, 3-00, 5:10,750, 10:00, 12:10
RAIN MAN i$
1:30, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55, 12:30
TWINS 1
11:25, 3:30,.5:30, 7:40, 10:05, 12:051
1'M GONNA GIT YOU SUCKA
3:15,5:20, 7:45,10:05,11:50 E'
THE NAKED GUN l
11:15,3:15,5:15,7:45. 9:50,11:45
Walt Disney's OLIVER & COMPANY
I 1200,1:50

us --

Aloha Pacific Cruises
Selected 7-day
Hawaiian cruises
aboard the Monterey.
Includes exclusive
AAA amenities.
from $1,329
Regency Cruises
Sail the Caribbean or
visit Alaska for 7 days
aboard the Regent
Sea. Regent Sun and
Regent Star.
rom $1,077
Tampa/Ft. Lauderdale
7-nights. air-only
from Detroit. Now
through April.
from $159

w n yorshopping Imi
to look
like this,?
Then call
AAA Travel

--

Saturd

Special Saturday hours 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
through April. Weekdays from 9:00a.m.- 5:3
Save...up to 30% on tours and cruises!
We're open to members and non members.
Everyone can travel with us!
Ann Arbor
1200 S. Main Street + 930-2250
buntLkbtterthanal .*.

ir

THE LAND BEFORE TIME ® I
12:00. 1:40

DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS
3:10,5:20,7:25,955,1210

PAGE 14 WEEKEND AEBRUARY 3, 1989"

...........

-. - *.7-~-~ -WEEKFND/FEBRUARYl.,1989

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan