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January 05, 1989 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ninety-nine years of editorialfreedom
Vol. IC, No.68 Ann Arbor, Michigan - Thursday, January 5, 1989 Copyright 1988, The Michigan Daily

U.S.

shoots

' WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. Navy jet
fighters shot down two Libyan MiG-23 jets
yesterday after the Americans were ap-
proached at high speed in what Defense
Secretary Frank Carlucci called "a hostile
manner" in international airspace over the
Mediterranean Sea.
Carlucci said the two American F-14
Tomcat jets acted solely in self-defense.
Based on preliminary reports, he said, the
Soviet-built Libyan jets activated their
weapon-targeting radar before the U.S. jets

opened fire with their air-to-air missiles.
Carlucci denied that the jets, assigned to
the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy,
were airborne to participate in a military
strike on a disputed chemical weapons pro-
duction plant inside Libya.
He said the carrier was only crossing the
Mediterranean toward a port call and con-
ducting routine operations when the inci-
dent occurred at midday local time, about 5
a.m. EST.
The U.S. planes, each carrying two crew

down
members, returned without incident to their
carrier and were then flown to Naples, Italy,
for debriefing, Carlucci said. The fate of the
two Libyan pilots remained unclear, al-
though he said "two parachutes were
sighted" and a rescue helicopter was later
seen in the area.
It was the first military confrontation
between the United States and Libya since a
U.S. bombing raid over Tripoli in 1986.
That raid came after the Reagan administra-
tion said it had conclusive evidence that

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was be-
hind a terrorist bombing attack in West
Germany.
Gadhafi yesterday asked the Soviet
Union to move some of its warships in the
Mediterranean to the area in which U.S.
vessels are operating near Libya, the Yu-
goslav news agency reported from Tripoli.
A reporter for Italian TV said Gadhafi's
residence-headquarters in Tripoli, already
equipped with watchtowers and tanks parked
in camouflaged garages, had been further

ibyan jets

fortified with anti-missile batteries in key
areas.
President Reagan, on vacation in Los
Angeles, was awakened about an hour after
thcdowning and told of the incident by Lt.
Gen. Colin Powell, his national security
adviser, in a phone call, said White House
Spokesperson Roman Popadiuk.
The spokesperson said he had no infor-
mation on Reagan's reaction, except to say
that the president "considers the incident
closed."

Blue
topples
Trojan
empire
BY PETE STEINERT
SPECIAL TO THE DAILY
PASADENA, Calif. - Before
Monday's Rose Bowl game,
Michigan coach Bo Schembechler
told his players to expect the
unexpected, to be prepared for
anything.
Sure thing, coach. The
Wolverines had already encountered
their share of surprises during the
regular season: the then unknown
Reggie Ho and his automatic toe
out-kicking Mike Gillette in the
season opener; Miami (Fla.) rallying
from laps behind; and starting
quarterback Michael Taylor breaking
his right collarbone against
Minnesota.
Michigan learned to deal with the
unexpected. And the Wolverines
taught many skeptics that lesson
with their come-from-behind 22-14
victory over Southern Cal. Sports
Illustrated's Nov. 14 issue said USC
would not lose to "a pretender from
the feeble Big Ten. A defeat would
be unthinkable."
Think again.
"Down 14-3, knowing what's
happened to us in the past, this team
has great resolve," said
Schembechler, now 2-7 in Rose
Bowls. "When they came back and
played like they did and won the
game, I think it was a great tribute
to them."
USC coach and former
Schembechler assistant Larry Smith
said: "I'm not disappointed, I'm just
damn angry."
Michigan dominated USC (10-2)
in the second half, outscoring the
Trojans, 19-0. The player of the
game, Leroy Hoard, scored two
touchdowns and rushed for 142 yards
- 113 in the second half - on 19
* carries.
See Roses, Page 3

M' win is a
heartfelt

one

for

Bo

The Schef's Specialty

'

f BY ADAM SCHEFTER

s ..

PASADENA, Calif. - The
maize and blue helmets were raised
to the sky, the players waving them
proudly. And suddenly the helmets
were joined in the air when Bo
Schembechler hoisted the Rose Bowl
trophy high above his shoulders.
Two forces meeting in the night.
Michigan football. Rose Bowl
trophy. A match made for the
heavens.
What does the fight song say?
The champions of the West? Yes.
They were. The champions of the
West. And that sure as hell beats
being the champions of just the
Midwest.
WHICH IS all Bo had been
seven of his last eight trips out to
Pasadena. With the win,
Schembechler took the monkey off
his back, grabbed him around the
neck, threw him to the ground, and
kicked him in the face.
Who said Bo couldn't win the
Rose Bowl? "Losing just tears your
heart out. And I don't have that good
a one to start with," Schembechler
said with a boyish grin. "I must say
that I am elated. That's the word -
elated."
It was ironic that Leroy Hoard
was responsible for so much of this
elation.
IT WAS Hoard who caused Bo
some heartache during the season.
It was Hoard who was left out of
the 1988 media guide - not a
mention of the sophomore fullback
in 117 pages. Academics, the reason.
It was Hoard who, after rushing
for 128 yards and two touchdowns

against Indiana, was suspended for
missing a class. An 8 o'clock class.
And how many of you have done the
same? But Hoard broke Bo's rules.
He had to pay. No trip to
Northwestern.
After that, there was no more
slamming of the snooze button, a
college student's favorite form of
procrastination. Hoard made it to
class. He made it to Pasadena. And it
was a good thing. Hoard ran for 142
yards (four more than Southern Cal's
net rushing total) and two fourth-
quarter touchdowns that put
Michigan on top to stay.
The first came on a race with four
USC defenders to the corner of the
end zone. And Hoard finished with
the tape around his chest. The second
came up the middle, on a fourth-
down play, as Hoard barreled over
USC's defense, as well as their
hopes.
"Leroy is very difficult to tackle,"
Schembechler said. "In the spring I
used to get mad at our defense for
not being able to bring him down.
Now I know why."
One person impressed by Hoard's
performance was John Robinson,
head coach of the Los Angeles
Rams. Robinson called
Schembechler after the game and said
if Hoard was in the draft this year,
he'd make him the Rams' No. 1
pick.
When the game ended and Hoard
ran off the field, he was asked what
he was going to do now that he was
named Rose Bowl Player of the
See Victors, Page 7

JOHN MUNur~- Dony
Michigan coach Bo Schembechler hoists over his head his second Rose Bowl trophy.
After three previous losses to Southern Cal in Pasadena, Schembechler finally got his
way.

Higgins suspended
for drinking incident

'U' grad's Tourist
to premiere tonight

.BY STEVE BLONDER
Who says history cannot repeat
itself?
For the second year in a row, the
Michigan basketball team will open
the Big Ten season against
Northwestern without the services of
guard Sean Higgins.
Higgins was suspended for three
games on Dec. 21 by coach Bill
*Frieder for "violating team training
rules," but Frieder refused to
elaborate. Frieder said he told his

starting guard to go for counseling,
but he denied Higgins was involved
with drugs.
Higgins does not have a phone
and was unavailable for comment.
However, Higgins' father, Earl,
said the suspension resulted from
Sean drinking alcohol at teammate
Terry Mills' 21st birthday party.
"Sean was drinking and he was
suspended, but he does not have a
drinking problem," Earl Higgins
said. "The rule, as explained to me,

says that athletes are not allowed to
drink. The suspension is justified
because he broke the rules.
"People need to understand,
though, that Sean is no different
from other students. The only
difference is he's an athlete.
Probably over 75 percent of all
college kids drink during the course
of the school year, and no one says
anything about it. He just did it
when he wasn't supposed to."
See Higgins, Page 8

'People need to
understand, though, that
Sean is no different from
other students.'
Earl Higgins on
his son Sean

BY MARK SHAIMAN
University graduate Lawrence
Kasdan's newest film, The Acci-
dental Tourist, will make its Mid-
west premiere tonight at the Mich-
igan Theater.
Kasdan may be best known,
especially around here, as the man
behind The Big Chill, a look at a
group of University grads during
their middle age. But after graduating
with a B.A. in English and a Mas-
ters in Education, as well as winning
four Hopwood awards, he started in
the film business as a writer, pen-
ning the scripts to Raiders of the
Lost Ark, The Empire Strikes Back,
and Return of the Jedi, three of the
most successful movies ever made.
Kasdan's directorial debut came in
1981 with the steamy thriller Body
Heat, which he also wrote. In the
lead roles he cast two then-unknown
actors, Kathleen Turner and William

on how to travel without coming
into contact with anything that is
"foreign." His orderly life changes
unexpectedly when his wife (Turner)
leaves him, and then even more
drastically when he becomes in-
See Tourist, Page 5
INSIDE
Looking back on 1988.
See Opinion, Page 4
George Mack blows the whistle
on the US. comta job in Central
America.
See Arts, Page 5
Michigan had more than one
champion over the vacation. The
Wolverine hockey team captured

Democrats pick mayoral candidate

BY DONNA IADIPAOLO
A relatively unfamiliar Ann Ar-
bor attorney and former member of
the U.S. House of Representatives
stepped forward to file as Democratic

resources, we should be trying to
solve our problems, and we should
be trying to demonstrate that to
other cities," Clevenger said.
But his announcement came after

tion.
In December Democratic coun-
cilmembers Larry Hunter (1st Ward),
Jeff Epton (3rd Ward) and Kathy Ed-
gren (5th Ward), along with former

the Democratic mayoral search
committee. "Basically, we were
looking for a strong candidate who
could beat Jernigan."
Republicans presently hold a 6-5

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