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January 31, 1989 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-31

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 31, 1989

Deans
Continued from Page 1
"According to the cardinal notion of utility
Cross uses, the extent to which the individual
maximizes some subjective state, such as jolts of
happiness, can be both quantified and measured.
This is perhaps the silliest notion of human na-
ture ever employed in a social science," he said.
Harvard Professor of Economics, Juliet Schor,
said the "cardinal utility theory is a concept that's
been largely discredited in economics." She said
many economists use it nevertheless, although
she considers their work mostly "removed from
the real world."
Although Cross denied ever having presented
work using cardinal utility theory, an article he

published in the Review of Economics and
Statistics in May of 1979, explicitly uses cardi-
nal utility:
"Nevertheless... we... treat (utility representa-
tion) as though it were obtained from a familiar
neoclassical cardinal utility index...," Cross
writes.
One.of the sources said that "without cardinal
utility, Cross's economic math model would in-
volve such impossibilities as negative probabili-,
ties or probabilities greater than 100 percent.
This is absurd and why he must use cardinal
utility."
"This incident does much to reveal the true
character of academia," said one of the unnamed
sources.

"If one devotes one's scholarship to esoteric
trivia, one can climb to the highest administra-
tive posts in the university, where one passes
judgement on the scholarship of others," he said.
"If, however, one examines concrete social is-
sues, such as racism, sexism, and poverty, in a
serious and critical way, one becomes viewed as a
heretic and is thus rejected by those in high
places."
"This is clearly what has happened here."
Last March, 28 economic doctoral students,
26 of whom requested anonymity, wrote a public
letter to the Daily decrying the lack intellectual
diversity within the field, as well as
institutionalized forms of racism and sexism in
the both the department's and the discipline's
hiring practices.

Alcohol
Continued from Page 1
assistant director of student relations.
Many still think the change is
insufficient. U.S. District Judge
Bernard Friedman said that it "doesn't
cover students who just don't want
to be in that environment.... This is
a student rights issue."
Alcohol is the most used and
abused drug on campus, said Teresa
Herzog, substance abuse coordinator
at University Health Services, "You
cannot abuse alcohol and not affect
people," she said.
Students should be able to retreat
into a clean, healthy dorm room at
any time, said Judy Berne, Deborah's
mother and an active supporter of the
bill.
"Having a roommate who wanted
to party all the time would have
made a difference," said Berne, the
student who initially requested an
alcohol-free room.
Until an alcohol question is added
to the applications, those who want
alcohol-free roommates can contact a
Health Disability Housing Advisor
to help them find suitable roommate
situations, said Carloyn Stacklee, a
University housing advisor.

'Associoted Press
A Galveston, Texas Police Department officer is shot with canned string by a young Mardi
Gras spectator as he attempts to clear a parade route. The 1989 Mardi Gras started this
weekend with parades and balls and will continue through Feb. 4.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Jury convicts Steinberg
NEW YORK - A state jury yesterday convicted Joel Steinberg of
manslaughter in the Nov. 2, 1987, beating death of his illegally adopted
6-year-old daughter, Lisa.
Steinberg showed no emotion as each of the 12 jurors was questioned
about the verdict. The jury also found him innocent of the more serious
charge of second-degree murder.
A conviction on the charge of first-degree manslaughter carries a
maximum sentence of 8 1-3 to 15 years. It was a charge that prosecutors
at one time had considered dropping from the case.
The verdict culminated a case that touched the nation's conscience,
with witnesses providing wrenching detail of the physical and emotional
havoc associated with child and spousal abuse.
The jury was in its eighth day of deliberations after a trial that lasted
three months. Sentencing was set for March 8.
National health plan proposed
WASHINGTON - A commission including Ford, Nixon, and Carter
on Monday proposed a national health care system that would ensure ac-
cess to basic medical services for all Americans with financing for all but
the poorest.
The system is designed to extend health care to the estimated 37 mil-
lion Americans who are uninsured, to curtail soaring health costs and to
improve the quality of medical care nationwide, said the National Leader-
ship Commission on Health Care.
The proposed system would continue a major role for private insurance
coverage and would encourage employees to extend such coverage to more
employees.
Also, everyone not covered under private insurance coverage would
receive benefits from a Universal Access Pool, which is financed by all
individuals not covered by Medicaid who have incomes over 150 percent
of the poverty level.
Battle arises over closing
of state hospitals for poor
JACKSON, Miss - Gov. Ray Mabus (D) has gotten himself into an
emotional battle by proposing to close the three charity hospitals that the
nation's poorest state operates for its poorest people .
Mabus says that the poor would be better served if the money that
funds the hospitals went instead to Medicaid and attracted Federal funds,
but opponents claim to have more than 100,000 petition signatures to
keep the hospitals open.
Mabus, who took office on a reform-based campaign, says the
hospitals are underfunded and represent the lower tier of a double standard
of health care in Mississippi.
The hospitals, set up in 1916 , collectively maintain only 199 of the
state's more than 15,800 hospital beds on a budget of $6.8 million.
They served 77,508 patients in the 1988 fiscal year, out of a population
of about 2.5 million.
Public queries pay raises
WASHINGTON - Observers in Congress, universities and public
interest groups questioned the fairness and wisdom Monday of pay raises
for dozens of senior federal judges who do no legal work.
All 306 senior federal judges-even those who no longer wield a
gavel-will see their salaries rise by about 50 percent unless Congress
disapproves raises due for top federal officials Feb. 8.
Judges who retire through resignation-the other option provided by
Congress-keep for life the same salary they received on their last day of
work.
Senior status is available to any judge who is at least 65 with 15 years
experience, or 70 with 10 years.
Administrative records indicate that roughly one in five of the nation's
senior judges do no judicial work whatsoever. Only 13 former judges have
chosen full retirement over senior status.
EXTRAS
Constipation cure found
FORT LAUDERDALE - Dr. Steven Wexner treats patients with
fatal diseases like cancer, but his specialty is a less deadly malady that
because of its nature is rarely discussed openly.
While most people call it constipation, Wexner calls it Young Execu-
tive Tight Spphincter Syndrome. His patients are usually 25 to 55 years
old and business executives.
"It begins with a type-A personality, the type who eats a low-fiber,
high-junk-food diet and can't take a few minutes to relax on the toilet," he
said.

A cure is minor outpatient surgery. A small cut is made to relax the
sphincter and ease bowel movement. Most patients are back to work the
day after.
To maintain "normal" bowel movements - anything from three times a
day to three times a week - Wexner urges a high-fiber diet of fruits, veg-
etables, and bran. "And don't get in the habit of taking laxatives and ene-
mas because the colon gets addicted to them after prolonged abuse."
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$25.00 in-town and $35 out-of-town, for fall only $15.00 in-town and $20.00 out-of-town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552 ,Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

9

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Contra
Continued from Page 1
administration for all his actions.
Lawyers were permitted to review
typewritten excerpts from Reagan's
diary a year ago, it was disclosed at a
hearing Friday.,.
North is accused of concealing
from Congress in 1985 and 1986 his
efforts on behalf of the Nicaraguan
Contras and of falsely telling then-
Attorney General Meese that the
National Security Council had no
role in diverting money from the
Iran arms sales to the Contras.

North was also accused of ille-
gally accepting a $13,800 security
system at his home from co-defen-
dant Richard Secord, converting to
his own use at least $4,300 in trav-
eler's checks from Contra leader
Adolfo Calero and conspiring to de-
fraud the Treasury of tax revenue in
connection with charitable contribu-
tion supporting the Contras.
Gesell on Jan. 13 dismissed the
two central charges against North,
conspiracy and theft counts accusing
him of illegally diverting more than
$14 million in U.S. Iran arms sale
proceeds to the Nicaraguan rebels.
Those charges were dismissed af-

ter a panel of intelligence experts in
the Reagan administration, citing
national security concerns, refused to
declassify many portions of classi-
fied documents that were deemed
necessary for the prosecution or de-
fense.
CLASSIFIED ADSI
Call 764-0557

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