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January 30, 1989 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-30

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18 U. THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

Student Body FEBRUARY 1989

18 THENATIONLCOLLEG NEWSPAPE Stud8RECdRE1ATIONE
Mountain madness All-Americans An age revisited Eye-opener
Students find mountain The college sports media Some students are A new study shows
bikes provide a new outdoor picks the best iootball adopting the sport of kings certain vitamins and
perspective. players of 1988. as their game. minerals help protect your
Page 21 Page 21 Page 21 vision. Page 22
TiATtI Athletes looking for an edge

I

Stories
By Donna Berkehammer
The Daily Northwestern
Northwestern U., IL
Mike Green has some stories to
tell.
Like the one about his college
football team holding a contest to
see who could get the drunkest.
One guy swallowed seven light-
bulbs in front of the judges, and
instead of being disgusted or horri-
fied, his buddies in the crowd just
egged him on.
The second contestant had been
drinking so much he threw up into
a clear plastic baggy. And he car-
ried it around with him. When he
faced the judges, he chugged the
contents of the baggie back down.
The guy who won started by
going to the cafeteria stark naked.
Somewhere along the way, he de-
cided the salad bar looked good, so
he tried to sit in the lettuce bowl.
The 200-plus pounder broke the
bowl, the table and his butt.
He stood up with blood pouring
down his thigh. So he grabbed a roll
and stuffed it in the gash to stem
the bleeding. But his performance
wasn't over. He ate the roll. And his
buddies cheered. He had won that
contest. He had proven he was the
drunkest.
"We were the heroes," Green re-
calls.
They were the football players,
the leaders, the animals. They had
the girls. They were envied. They
were cool.
And they were alcoholics.
All the discipline they learned on
the field didn't last past the show-
ers. Mike Green never drank at all
until his high school senior prom.
He drank for just seven years, and
he'll never drink again.
He doesn't want that to happen
to anyone else.
Apparently, neither does the
Northwestern Athletic Depart-
ment, which made all athletes,
coaches and even administrators
hear Green last week.
What it couldn't do was make
them listen. Mike Green had to do
that.
"My name is Mike Green. I'm an
athlete. I was a fraternity brother. I
am a recovering alcoholic. Do you
want what I have?"
See GREEN, Page 22

Steroids just not worth the weight
By David Nakamoto and Paul f
Young
Ka Leo 0 Hawaii
U. of Hawaii
You're a serious athlete looking for an
edge.
It doesn't matter what sport you are
in. Nor does it matter what level you're
at. You need to be stronger, faster or
just plain better - so you turn to ster-
oids.
While it is true that anabolic steroids
increase body weight, often through in-
creases in the lean body mass, they have
been linked with many more adverse
effects.
Foremost on the list of adverse effects
is death. Individuals have died due to
liver cancer caused by steroids.
The list also includes kidney dis-
orders, cardiovascular problems, hyper-
tension, decreased sperm count, breast
growth and impotence in men, and men-
strual irregularities and masculiniza-
tion -the appearance of facial hair and
deepening of the voice - in women.
U. of Hawaii (UH) Associate Athletic
Director Rockne Freitas said he has no
reason to believe that anabolic steroids
are a problem with the UH athletes.
"I'm not so naive that (steroid use)
doesn't exist," Freitas said. "In the past,
I may have had reason to believe that
they (steroids) have been used. This
year, they have not.
"Every one of us (in the administra-
tion) feels a responsibility to educate
our athletes on substance abuse, ster-
oids, etc." dorm room in which he derived pleasure spread and growing toda
Taking steroids does not only result from threatening a pizza delivery boy at A survey conducted at
in physical damage; it also has psycho- point-blank range with a shotgun. tion High School in footb
logical effects, according to Physician Because steroids increase muscle ida indicated that 18 perc
and Sportsmedicine. mass and endurance, athletes who par- students had tried the dr
In an extreme case of aggressive be- ticipate in sports such as football, to Physician and Sportsa
havior, Tommy Chaikin, a former de- weightlifting, bodybuilding, track and A former UH football pl
fensive lineman at the U. of South Caro- field, and swimming are likely candi- during his playing days he
lina, said in the Oct. 24, 1988 issue of dates. for about three years. H
Sports Illustrated that he was prone to Anabolic steroids are not a new phe- about 10 percent of the
violent outbursts and nearly driven to nomenon. The first synthetic steroid them.
suicide by steroids. was manufactured by Charles Kocha-
Chaikin described an incident in his kin in 1935. Use of the drugs is wide- See STERI

a

0

4

4

y.
South Planta-
all-crazy Flor-j
ent of the male
rug, according
medicine.
ayer said that
e took steroids
[e added that
team was on
RIDS, Page 21

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