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January 30, 1989 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-30

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 30, 1989- Page 5
Nicaragua seeks support
in economic struggle

MANAGUA, Nicaragua (AP) -
The leftist Sandinista government is
desperately seeking the support of
capitalists and workers to brake
Nicaragua's rapid slide into
economic chaos.
With the war against U.S.-backed
rebels virtually stalled, President
Daniel Ortega faces a potentially
deadlier enemy: an economy so
feeble even Sandinista supporters are
becoming restless.
"There's a general awareness that
the problem belongs to the whole
country," and the government cannot
rescue the economy single-handedly,
said Bayardo Arce, a member of the
ruling Sandinista National
Directorate.
"We must establish a harmony of
interests outlining the
responsibilities of the government,
private enterprise, and workers, so
we can face the country's problems,"
he said.
, Today Ortega is to announce his
government's economic plan for
1989, which is expected to include a
series of austerity measures.
The measures reportedly include a
three-month wage and price freeze to
curb inflation, which independent
economists predict will reach as high
as 300 percent a month from now
through May. Ortega has
acknowledged that inflation reached
20,000 percent last year.
In a Dec. 31 speech, Ortega

announced budget cuts of 29 percent
for the Defense Ministry and 40
percent for security forces. The
government has not said how many
jobs will be eliminated as a result.
Opposition leader Enrique
Bolanos, a cotton grower and former
president of the Superior Council of
Private Enterprise, was skeptical of
the Sandinistas' show of good will

toward the business community.
"When they have problems, they
seek us. But when the storm is over,
they return to their insults," said
Bolanos.
This month the official exchange
rate has gone from 920 cordobas to
the dollar to 2,300 cordobas a dollar.
The minimum wage is 3,748
cordobas a day, about $1.63.

graphic design
illustration
page layout.

7

JOHN WEISE/Daily
Rattle and strum
Dan Kelson, LSA junior (on left), and Steve Hise, Engineering sophomore, take advantage
of Saturday's springlike weather by hanging out on the Diag with their six-strings.
Congress begins week with
cabinet approvals, pay raises

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interviewingSaturday, feb. 4. student publications
building - 420 maynard (back door) 764-0552

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate bores ahead
with confirmation proceedings on President Bush's
Cabinet this week, while the political imperative for
most House members seems to be to stay out of sight
and accept a $45,000 pay raise without a vote.
Little or no major action is expected on the key is-
sue facing Congress - reducing the federal deficit -
until after President Bush presents his own proposals
at a joint session of Congress on Feb. 9.
In the meantime, Democratic officials say at least
three and perhaps more Cabinet appointees will come
up for a vote in the Senate this week, and all are ex-
pected to win easy confirmation. The list includes
Robert Mosbacher as Commerce Secretary, Carla Hills
as trade representative and Samuel Skinner to run the
Transportation Department.
Votes also are possible this week on the appoint-
ments .of Manuel Lujan as Interior Secretary and
Michael Boskin to head the president's Council of
Economic Advisers.
The timing is less certain for Defense Secretary-
designate John Tower, whose hearing will continue
before the Senate Armed Services Committee tomor-
row. Ed Derwinski, Bush's choice to lead the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs, should begin his confirma-

tion hearing today.
Dr. Louis Sullivan, who has emerged as the most
controversial Cabinet appointee because of uncertainty
over his views on abortion, faces the Senate Finance
Committee at a confirmation Wednesday on his ap-
pointment as Secretary of Health and Human Re-
sources.
Sullivan sought to reassure conservative Republi-
cans that he shares their opposition to abortion last
week after he was quoted as having told one lawmaker
that he does not favor overturning the Supreme Court
decision that legalized the operations.
The Senate confirmed three Cabinet officials last
week, approving Secretary of State James Baker III;
Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole and Budget Director
Richard Darman on votes of 99-0. In addition, Trea-
sury Secretary Nicholas Brady; Attorney General
Richard Thornburgh and Education Secretary Lauro
Cavazos are holdover appointments from the Reagan
administration and do not require confirmation.
Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, while dis-
closing plans for confirmation votes this week, has
promised a vote on the pay raise but has not yet said
when it will be.

STUDENTS: NEED TO SHARPEN YOUR
READING AND STUDY SKILLS?
The READING AND LEARNING SKILLS CENTER is offering classes to help you:
* learn reading and study strategies
* organize and plan study time
* learn strategies for note-taking, reading comprehension and test preparation
* have more time for other interests
Classes will meet Wednesdays, February 8 - March 22 (no class March 1), 3:30 - 5:00 P.M.
Fee: $85.00
REGISTER BY FEB 3

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FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:
READING & LEARNING SKILLS CENTER
1610 Washtenaw (near Hill St.)..
763-7195

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$25,000 SCHOLARSHIPS:
A VALUABLE PROGRAM.
A PERSONAL CHALLENGE.
The NROTC Scholarship Program offers you a two-year college scholarship
that's worth as much as $25,000. And it offers you the opportunity to become
a Navy officer and start a successful career.
During college, the Navy pays tuition, cost of textbooks, instructional
fees, and provides an allowance of $100 a month for up to 20 months during
your last two years of college. Upon graduation and completion of
requirements, you'll become part of the Navy adventure as a commissioned
Navy officer.
Call your Navy representative for more information on this challenging
program.

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