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January 27, 1989 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-27

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ARTS

Te Michigan Daily

Friday, January 27, 1989

Page 8

MAAP to analyze
Strange Interlude
BY MARK SHAIMAN
W HILE plays are meant to be performed, they are also works of literature
and should be read and analyzed as such. This weekend, the Michigan
Association of the Advancement of Psychoanalysis will be hosting a reading
of Eugene O'Neill's Strange Interlude, which will be followed by much
discussion.
Interlude is a compelling psychological drama about a woman's struggle
for fulfillment and power. It startled its audiences back in the '20s when it
premiered, partly because of its content and partly because of its seven-hour
length. The reading will be an abbreviated version and performed by a cast of
professionals, who have appeared at the Attic Theater in Detroit under the
direction of Walter Hill.
Evangeline Spindler, President-Elect of the Michigan Psychoanalytic
Society and a faculty member here, at the Michigan Psychoanalytic Insti-
tute, and Wayne State, will introduce the evening along with Alvin Spin-
dler, Faculty Supervisor of the Psychiatry Department's Long-Term Psycho-
therapy Clinic at the University, who will also present an interpretation of
the play after the reading.
Benedict Nightingale, author, former drama critic, and current Professor
of English and of Theater and Drama at the University will respond to Spin-
dler's presentation.
The performance of STRANGE INTERLUDE will be held tomorrow night
starting at 7 p.m. at Rackham Ampitheatre (4th floor). Tickets will be
available at the door.

BY LIAM FLAHERTY
THE Art Ensemble of Chicago has
been a rare constellation in recent
years. Its five members - Lester
Bowie, Roscoe Mitchell, Joseph
Jarman, Malachi Favors Maghostut,
and Famoudou Don Moye - have
all taken divergent paths. Some wear
lab coats, others tribal masks, but
when they haul their arsenal of mu-
sical equipment on stage, they come
to play.
The dissonance and delight, the
multifarious rhythms that have car-
ried this essential group through
three decades, still beat unceasingly.
On stage, their personalities are in-
tegrated but not subsumed. In a land
of many groups, they are a true en-
semble; they breathe a collective
breath.
The Art Ensemble's first rum-
blings began in the early '60s, when
Chicagoans Mitchell (reeds) and
Maghostut (bass) were playing for
Muhal Richard Abrams, the father of
the Association for the Advancement
of Creative Musicans. Imbued with
that group's free thinking and coop-
erative spirit, Mitchell and Maghos-
tut hooked up with reedman Jarman
and trumpeter Bowie. It wasn't until
1967 that they began playing under
their current banner.
Chafing under America's general
contempt for any originality that
doesn't emerge from a corporate
planning board, the Ensemble landed
in Europe. It was in Paris, in 1971,
that percussionist Moye joined the
group, establishing a link that went
far beyond a time keeper. Moye
brought an interest in non-Western
rhythms (primarily African), as well
as a backbeat which could propel
bop, funk and the most distant of
their free interplanetary composi-
tions.
The Ensemble returned to the
States shortly afterwards, acclaimed
and now undeniable. After absorbing
countless sounds over so many
years, it would be impossible to
predict what they may play on any
given night. They surely will have
an abundance of means to choose
from; the full range of saxophones,
clarinets, flutes, horns, shells,
whistles and most anything else that
can be blown on a public stage.
Virtually any percussion instrument
existing will be present, as well as
"homemade instruments," meaning

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The members of the Art Ensemble of Chicago have fol-
lowed a number of different paths over the last few years,

but tnis weekend, they've all

led back to Ann Arbor.

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etc.

3

anything a sound can be wrought
from. As Lester Bowie has suc-
cinctly stated: "all's fair in love and
war, and music's both."
Their sound has been consolidated
without any stagnation. They keep
each other honest, and the differences
are celebrated as much as the
similarities. It may go from
Mitchell's guttural roars on the
baritone to Bowie's sassy licks on

the trumpet, perhaps separated by an
atavistic percussion jam, with some
mime and improvisation spliced
throughout.
Theirs is "Great Black Music:
Ancient to the Future," proclaimed
loudly and unwaveringly, a plangent
call spilt out on reeds and horns, and
drummed into our collective heart.
The Art Ensemble drags the ghost
out of the machine, dressing it in

ancestral paint and pushing it out to
dance behind polyrhythms and be-
yond. And tonight Ann Arbor is
damn lucky to be at the point of
harmonic convergence, where ancient
and future intersect, and the present
can happen but once.
THE ART ENSEMBLE OF
CHICAGO will perform tonight at8
p.m. at the Michigan Theater. Tick-
ets are $16.50.

eeflpse presents

"FRIDAY, FEB.10
S8:00 PM
POWER CENTER
M 4

. .

ALL PSI CHI
MEMBERS
Don't forget about our
HAPPY HOUR
Today at 4:00 p.m. at
CHARLEY'S
for all the nachos
you can eat!

Dayshift Positions Available Now
Starting Pay $5.00/Hour
Apply in Person at McDonald's
Next to
Nickels
McDonald's Arcade
* 337 Maynard
U® 995-2476
The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

*I

Charge by phone 763-TKTS. Tickets available at the
Michigan Union Ticket Office and all . outlets
) i j r idjf)jj RESTAURANT
"24 YEARS EXPERIENCE"
CH EF JAN
TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER
JUDGES SPECIAL AWARD
SPONSORED BY MICHIGAN RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION
MICHIGAN CHEFS DE CUISINE ASSOCIATION

I .1

c/i

is pleased to present...
JAZZ IN JANUARY!
- - -4-

Sun.
January 29

Michigan Chamber Players
School of Music faculty Lynne Aspnes,
harp; Keith Bryan, flute; Andres
Cardenes, violin; Hamao Fujiwara,
violin; Jerome Jelinek, cello; Katsurako
Mikami, piano; John Mohler, clarinet;
Yizhak Schotten, viola.
Dvorak Terzetto
Ravel Sonatine en Trio
Stravinsky L'Histoire du Soldat
Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
FREE

BLUE RIBBON WINNER
BEST CHEF AWARD
IN WASHINGTON D.C.

I Tues.

University Symphony Orchestra

. .

- -

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