100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1989 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 6, 1989-Page 11

Frank Allison and the Odd Sox
Monkey Business
Relapse Records
It's amazing how four little words can do in a band
like this one. Those words are "for a local band," as in
"they have some pretty good songs for a local band."
Translation: go see them at Rick's if it's $2 pitcher
night, but spend your record-buying money on a real
album instead.
This is not, repeat, not, a good album for a local
band. This is a great album for any band, local or oth-
erwise. The first full-lengther from those lovable
goofballs who've been making watered-down beer taste
just a little better for Ann Arborites for some time
now, Monkey Business captures all of their live
energy and goofiness, and then some. I say "and then
some," because it also shows, through capable pro-
duction (despite being recorded in Frank's kitchen) and
probably the coolest lyric sheet ever (written in pseudo-
rebus form with illustrations courtesy of Allison), that
there's more to these guys than just silly faces and
creative fliers.
The key word here is exuberance. The entire album,
with Allison's cockeyed lyrics and melodies, exudes a
sort of cynical optimism if such is possible. The songs
are mostly tales of debt - financial, romantic, and

r r r r
otherwise - but all the while there's a sense that life
sucks, but it's not going to get any better by whining .;
about it. On "Crediting Men's Hayride," for example,
Allison sings about losing his shirt to The Man by -
throwing an imaginary bash for the collectors. When
the album does get heavy, on the pining "Please Come
Home," and "Slaves," it's done with an inventive
freshness that defies melancholy ("will you romance
some new guy/who looks like Dick Tracy/ and smells
kind of queer," from "Please").
And none of the lyrical blues get in the way of the
album's danceability. From the frenzied tip of the hat
to Eddie Cochran, "Louder," to "Hayride," the Odd Sox
play with all the verve of a pack of sixth-graders at
recess wired on chocolate milk and Pop-Rocks.
"Athletic Dan" for my money is one of the best pop
songs of this year, its trebly guitar strums carrying it
to its end in what seems like far less than its three-odd
minutes.
With material like this and an expanding out-of-
town schedule, it's possible we might not have the
Sox all to our greedy little selves forever. But Monkey
Business will at least give their fans something worth
keeping long after the beer spills on their pant legs and
the green ink spots on the backs of their hands have
long since faded.

m :q*
Freud may say Melanie Griffith and Harrison Ford are suffering from some kind of complex
resulting from not being breast fed, thus causing them to suck on their fingers, but in reality
they're biting their nails as they contemplate an important business deal in Working Girl.

ork ng
Continued from Page 1
Griffith plays Tess McGill, the new secretary to
power-position-holding Katharine Parker (Weaver).
Parker claims to be open to any suggestions that Tess
may have, stating that their professional relationship
is "a two-way street." What Tess finds out is that both
lanes lead in Parker's direction. So when Parker is
incapacitated from a skiing accident, Tess tries to
implement one of her own ideas without going
through the heirarchy and redtape of the company by
acting as her own boss.
i .Her first step is to set up a meeting with Jack

Trainer (Ford), another corporate wheeler-dealer. It isn't,
until 40 minutes into the film that Harrison Ford
makes his first appearance, and by this time Weaver's
character is hung up at the hospital; so rarely until the
final climactic scene does Griffith appear on screen
with both her co-stars at once. However, she is in
nearly every scene throughout the film, and even one-
on-one with Ford or Weaver, she still wins out.
In Something Wild, Griffith donned black hair and
numerous odd outfits to match her unique character. In
Working Girl, she starts off with a New Yorker's
speech patterns and a bad habit of overdressing, but she
learns enough from Katharine toschange her image by
speaking clearer and dressing sharper. As Director
Nichols remarks "Eighty percent of the battle is style.
And Tess literally has to masquerade in order to
demonstrate her ability and free herself." This may
seem like a paradox, but it is the truth.
Tess carries on her charade of being a power-holder,
and at the same time becomes romantically involved
with Trainer. This is where the comedy comes in, but
masked in the laughs is a serious look at the people
involved, much the same way as in The Graduate. And
if you are looking for a line to match the infamous
"Plastics" from 20 years ago, you'll find it when
Griffith first meets Trainer and tells him "I've got a
brain for business and a body for sin."
Well, it's obvious that she's got a brain for acting,
and as for the other part we'll leave that up to Don
Johnson who will soon remarry Griffith, whom he
divorced ten years ago. What a DINK pair this
Working Girl and Guy will make!
WORKING GIRL is playing at Showcase Cinemas
and at Briarwood.

Traveling
Volume One
Wilbury Records

Read
Ube
~Daieg

Wilburys

Who are these guys trying to
fool? Nobody's going to fall for
this Wilbury ruse - the Wilburys
(Lucky, Otis, Charlie T. Jr., Nel-
son, and Lefty... or, uh, Bob
[Dylan], Jeff [Lynne], Tom
[Petty], George [Harrison], and
Roy [Orbison]) are just too recog-
nizable, both visually and musi-
cally. Of course, this could be the
reason for their attempt to disguise
themselves - a desire to get away
from all the inherent expectations
that accompany a project with their
names and faces on it. Certainly
this album is more lighthearted
than its progenitors' recent efforts.
Musically, Volume One is free-
spirited and fun yet not without
powerful emotions. Lefty, the
crooner of the group, who is
somewhat out of place amongst
his four rough-voiced brothers,
showcases his multi-octave range
(guess who he is...) on "Not Alone
Any More," and Lucky explores
the darker side of his family's mu-
sic on "Tweeter And The Monkey
Man."
The album was produced by Otis
and Nelson Wilbury, and uses

many of the same sounds as Nel-
son's recent solo album (which
was, coincidentally, also produced
by Otis and Nelson). Each Wilbury
has one or two songs on which
they sing lead, and several songs
split the vocal duties among the
brothers.
Perhaps the anonymity, or at-
tempt thereof, freed up the
Wilburys to relax a bit and have
fun again with their music. What-
ever the cause, the effect is a won-
derful album. Let's hope for Vol-
ume Two sometime soon.
- Chuck Skarsaune
Ofra Haza
"Im Nin' Alu"/ "Galbi" 12"
Sire
Considering the otherwordly,
trancelike state that can be conjured
by the discotheque experience -
where the rhythm bypasses the
intellect and envelops one's motor
instinct with abandon - I'm sur-
prised modern dance music neglects
the mystic potential of vocal
sources. Certainly, the growing
deployment of rat-a-tat stuttering
samples and scratch mutations has
brought the vocal element further
into the percussive mix in a
strangely appealing way. But
considering the copycattish creative
insularity of the U.S./England disco

-Jim Poniewozik
industry, it's not surprising that it
should take some cross-breeding
from non-Western sources to break:.
through.
An unexpected synthesis of the
Levantine sources behind Peter.
Gabriel's score to The Last Tempta-
tion of Christ and the mix-a-lot
frenzy of M/A/R/R/S' "Pump up thea
Volume," Israeli singer Ofra Haza.-
takes the wailing voices and,
undulating fiddle sounds of ancient
Yemenite folk songs such as "Im
Nin' Alu" as the basis for over-
whelming synthesized grooves that
stand out thankfully far from the
jamming crowd, especially in a year
where a scary disco medley of Peter
Frampton and Lynyrd Skynrd looks
to be the genre's most unlikely hit.
Unfortunately, the overzealous
American remixing of these tracks
- originally recorded in Tel Aviv
- tends to obscure the unique
qualities of Haza's music. But at
least you're given the choice of two
different full-out mixes of both
songs. And perhaps it's oddly
appropriate that these remixes em-
phasize the irony of how, in a genre
where change is usually characterized
by technological one-upsmanship,
an antiquated source has given rise to
the most exciting and effective new
twist around.
--Michael Paul Fischer

Ir

U,,

* TEXTBOOKS
NEW AND USED: REQUIRED
AND RECOMMENDED BOOKS
FOR ALL COURSES
BOOK BUY BACK
CASH FOR YOUR USED BOOKS
THROUGHOUT THE YEAR.
RECEIVE UP TO 50% OF
LIST PRICE
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
COMPLETE SELECTION

AL

po

-J

1

r

66

-J

* REFERENCE AND LEISURE READING
NEW AND CLASSIC TITLES IN
ALL SUBJECT AREAS. EXTENSIVE
LAW, MATHEMATICS, AND
COMPUTER SCIENCE SECTIONS.

IJIMICHIGAN UNION BOOKSTORE

CLOSE

CONVENIENT

CONGENIAL

OPEN DAILY ALL SEMESTER
ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF THE MICHIGAN UNION

MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY

9:00 am
9:00 am
10:00 am
12:00 pm

- 7:00 pm
- 5:00 pm
- 6:00 pm
- 6:00 pm

W

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan