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January 25, 1989 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-25

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,.F
r
LINDSAY MORRISIDaIly
balance beam. The
against Ohio State at

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 25, 1989 - Page 5
European Starling.birds
'drop' in on campus

P'p in the air
LSA sophomore Christine Furlong does a straddle leap high above the
4niversity's first home women's gymnastics meet is Saturday at 7:30
Crisler Arena.

tJMASC confronts Asian
.American political issues

BY NICOLE SHAW
It's dusk on the Diag, and stu-
dents make their daily trek home
from classes. Suddenly, they hear
and see a large, overpowering flock
of birds converging on the trees high
overhead.
The quest for home suddenly be-
comes more urgent as many secretly
wonder if the creatures, like those in
Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds, will
attack.
But travelers to the Diag and
other places around campus that
seem blanketed with birds need not
fear, zoologists say. The birds,
commonly called European Star-
lings, are only dangerous to those
who insist on standing under a nest-
ing tree and stamping their feet - in
which case they are in danger of be-
ing "dropped" upon, said Janet Hin-
shaw, a museum technician in the
University's Museum of Zoology's
bird division.
In its annual bird count conducted
every Christmas, the Audubon
Society found about 2,000 more
European Starlings this year in
Washtenaw County than last, bring-
ing the count to a total of 6,381.
However, "this may not be a real
difference," said Hinshaw, "because
it's not done in a very scientific
manner." The society members roam
around looking for birds, without
using strict calculating procedures,
Hinshaw said.
European Starlings were brought
into the United States in the early
1800s "by (European immigrants)
AUD
c PASS
IT
AROUND!

The birds, commonly called European Starlings, are
only dangerous to those who insist on standing under a
nesting tree and stamping their feet - in which case
they are in danger of being "dropped" upon.
- Janet Hinshaw, a museum technician in the
University's Museum of Zoology's bird division.

his plays." Most of them did not
survive, she said.
The starlings' diet consists of in-
sects and grain. The only thing that
may be harmful to humans is the
fungus that lives in their droppings
after it has accumulated, but that is a
very rare occurrence, said Hinshaw.
The starlings stay in Ann Arbor
all year round, and tend to group into
large flocks during the winter. They
make a loud screeching noise at

The birds' only aggressive ten-
dency is to fight for nesting holes.
Starlings will kick woodpeckers and
bluebirds out of their own nests and
take over, Hinshaw said.
All in all, the birds are only a
nuisance if you live near a roosting
tree. Then their noise may keep you
awake and their droppings may in-
convenience you.
Alfred Hitchcock probably exag-
gerated.

who missed the birds they had back
home," said Hinshaw. "They were
much more successful here than
anyone thought they would be."
Hinshaw explained that people
wanted to bring to America "all the
birds Shakespeare had mentioned in

night, but besides that, are harmless.
During the day, the birds spread
out to look for food. At night, they
tend to "roost," or sleep, close to-
gether in evergreens and other trees.
So the birds are generally sighted at
dusk or at night.

By ANNA BONDOC
%"It's hard to learn about Asian American issues at
the U of M," said LSA senior Eugene Pak, a member
oEhe University of Michigan Asian Student Coalition
(UIMASC).
"At the organization's mass meeting last night, Pak
ard others spoke about UMASC's three central goals,
wlich have existed since its formation in 1987: to
*fiht both personal and institutionalized forms of
racism at the University; to foster Asian American
urity and support; and to promote Asian American
awareness and education.
s "Being academically oriented, and having been in-
valved in Asian American politics, I find this the
dlesest thing to what I'm looking for in a student or-
gapization," said graduate student Scott Wong, who
toches an American Culture course. Wong's course is
the only University class which deals specifically with
Asian American Issues.
lo While other Asian American campus organizations

deal primarily with social activities, Wong said,
UMASC is the only group that confronts political is-
sues.
During the past year, two UMASC members have
served on the search committee to select a new director
of the University's Office of Affirmative Action.
Graduate student Jihn Feng said members of UMASC
hold regular meetings with Charles Moody, vice
provost for minority affairs "to communicate needs of
Asian Americans to the administration."
Feng also emphasized that the term "Asian Ameri-
cans" is not exclusive to Koreans, Chinese, or
Japanese Americans, a common misconception.
UMASC, he said, also represents the concerns of
Indians, Pakistanis, Filipinos, and all other peoples of
the Far East.
LSA senior Tieng Lim said during her two years as
a UMASC member, she has achieved "an awareness of
the barriers that face [Asian Americans] as minorities."

I I
I I
Eli Lilly and Company
(A Research Based Pharmaceutical Manufacturer)
Will be on Campus Conducting
Interviews for Students Interested in Careers as
System Analysts and Summer Internships
Tuesday, February 14, 1988
at the Sterns Building on North Campus

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