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January 06, 1989 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Reagan
agrees
to pay
raise
WASHINGTON (AP) -
President Reagan has decided to
approve a 50 percent pay increase for
2,500 top federal officials, including
nmembers of Congress, and will urge
lawmakers to bar outside income
sluch as speaking fees, a
spokesperson for the president said
yesterday.
Reagan plans to send members of
Congress a letter today urging them
to support the pay raise, deputy
press secretary Leslyc Arsht said in a
statement released by the White
House.
Reagan could have modified the
proposal made last month by the
Commission on Executive,
SLegislative and Judicial Salaries.
Under the law, unless both the
House and Senate vote to head off
the pay increases, they will
aitomatically take effect 30 days
after the plan is submitted to
Congress with the proposed federal
budget on Monday.
The commission recommended
ffat mcribers of Congress and
federal district judges, who now
make $89,000 a year, be paid
$135,000. The House speaker would
go from $115,000 to $175,000, and
Majority and minority leaders form
$99,500, to $155,000.
Top executive-branch officials
such as Cabinet members would get
raises from itheir current $99,500 to
S155,0(0.)
The commission also
r commended that Congress raise the
president's pay to about S350,000
from the current $200,000 which has
been fixed since 1969.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 6,1989 - Page 5

. . ROBIN LOZNAK/Daily
Hail to the Victors
Employees of Moe's Sports pose in front of their display, which celebrates Michigan's Rose Bowl victory. From left
are Tonie Venic Stephenson, and store general manager Debra Bishop.

Regents
approve
Vest,
Atkins
BY MARION DAVIS
The University's Board of Re-
gents formally approved former En-
gineering Dean Charles Vest's pro-
motion to University Vice President
for Academic Affairs and Provost at:
its December meeting.
The regents' action came as no
surprise after University President
James Duderstadt chose Vest as his
second-in-command in early Decem-
ber.
Prof. Daniel Atkins, an associate
engineering dean, will serve as in-
terim dean for one year, until the
permanent replacement for Vest is
appointed.
The regents also approved Atkins'
temporary appointment last month.
Robert Holbrook, associate vice.
president for academic affairs, sail
last night that a search committee
for the permanent engineering dean
will be formed "very shortly, maybe
in the next few days."
Holbrook said he has just received
responses to his questionnaires about
the committee's structure, which
have been circulating among engi-
neering faculty since early Decem,
ber.
High-level University searches
generally last a year.
Vest has been at the University
since 1963, when he enrolled as a
graduate student in mechanical engi-
neering. He earned his bachelor's de-
gree from West Virginia University
and his master's and doctorate from
Michigan.
Atkins received his Ph.D. i
computer science from the Univer-
sity of Illinois and joined the U-M
Department of Engineering and
Computer Science in 1972 as assis
tant professor.
Both appointments went into ef
feet last Sunday.
R'A
U59
Cho' ed6 .

Study: Poor smLoke

more

CHICAGO (AP) - Smoking, once a flaunted
habit of the sophisticated and high-class, is more
a mark of the poor and less educated almost 25
years after the government first warned of to-
bacco's dangers, researchers say.
"Smoking prevalence has declined across all
education groups, but the decline has occurred
five times faster among the higher educated com-
pared with the less educated," said researchers at
the national Centers for Disease Control in At-
lanta.
From 1974 to 1985, the proportion of smok-
ers among people who had completed four years
of college plummeted by more than a third, from

28.5 percent to 18.4 percent, the researchers re-
ported in Friday's Journal of the American Medi-
cal Association.
But the corresponding drop in the smoking
rate among people who had never graduated from
high school was only 2.1 percentage points,
from 36.3 percent to 34.2 percent, the researchers
found.
A spokesperson for the Tobacco Institute, a
Washington-based group representing the tobacco
industry, said the study only confirms that people
in that segment of society enjoy smoking.
"The antismoking forces should not adopt
some paternalistic attitude saying these people

are less in a position to take information on
smoking and health and make a rational decision
on whether or not they should smoke," said Gary
Miller.
Women who had never graduated from college
took up the habit in greater numbers than they
dropped it, with the proportion of such women
who smoked reaching an all=time high of 44.4
percent in 1985, the researchers said.
"Smoking is decreasing at a steady rate," but
the decline has been unequal across
"sociodemographic subpopulations of society,"
they said.

GM president happy with improvement

DETROIT (AP) - A Happy
General Motors Corp.. President
Robert Stempel said yesterday the
nation's largest automaker had turned
the corner toward industry leadership,
but he stopped short of predicting if
GM's Chevrolet Division would
pass Ford in car and truck sales.
Stempel, venturing onto the floor
of the North American International
Auto Show shortly after GM's year-

end sales figures were released said
the 5.5 percent increase in 1988 car
and light truck sales over the year
before showed that GM was on the
road back.
"The numbers have started to
move in the right way," he said,
adding that the 1.7 million truck
GM sold during 1988 was a record.
The company said it sold 3.6 mil-
lion cars last year.
Ford Motor Co., meanwhile, said

it sold 2.2 million cars and 1.5 mil-
lion trucks in 1988, while Chrysler
Corp. sold 1.1 million cars and
nearly 1 million trucks.
But Stempel declined to speculate
when Chevrolet could regain the lead
it once held over Ford.
"I'm certainly pushing them," he
said. "The customer is going to de-
cide when we catch and pass Ford."
During the past few months, GM
has surprised analysts with swelling

sales and its third-quarter earnings.
One analyst who hasn't been too
surprised is Charles Brady of
Oppenheimer & Co. of New York.
Yesterday, he said analysts com-
ing to the show and seeing the cars
that GM and other U.S. automakers
were displaying would start coming
around to his way of thinking.
"Competitors have found Detroit
can do things," Brady said.

Tickets on sale at the Michigan Union
Ticket Office, Herb David Guitar Stud-W
io, and all TicketMaster Outlets now;
and all Schoblkids Records after Janu-
ary 1,1989.g
Charge by Phone 763-TKTS
A Fundraiser for the Ark
Accommodations by Ann Arbor Inn The Personal C' mn
Major Events Presentation al lumn
&'.CHIGAN DAILY( CLASSIF IED ADS
a.I

BE NICE TO YOURSELF
BUY AATA SEMESTER PASS
$75.00
CONVENIENT, ECONOMICAL
UNLIMITED RIDES
. rI THE
Ann Arbor Transportation Authorfty
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

EVOLUTION-MICRO TO MACRO?
"Limited changes and adaptation is proven. The large scale
observations appear to conclude that everything is tied to basic
singular ancestry. Physiology, adaptation, and fossil records
indicate we humans have our origin in the lowest of animal
kingdoms."(?)
Problem: (1) Physiology is considered only on a basis of assump-
tions, similarity of ppearance does not prove ancestry. (2) No
adaptation allows mixing and mingling of Families; strong
deviations within Fa rtilies are seen, but the identity of the Family
remains intact. (3) Fos!il records are jumbled,rincomplete for any
varifiable conclusion to be stated as fact except that the retriev-
able fossil itself did indeed exist at sometime in the past. To claim
a lineage beyond limited adaptation on the basis of fossils is
speculative wisling at best or at worst, deception.
Thus, efforts to make limited adaptation a fact of origin of species
is in vain. To fail to make the distinction of terms by cloaking all
under "evolution" is lousy science and dishonest philosophy.
J. Terry Wheeler

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