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January 20, 1989 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-20

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 20, 1989- Page 3

Soviet troops to

remove

nuclear arms

t VIENNA, Austria (AP) - The
1050,000 Soviet troops being pulled
out of Eastern Europe will take the
niuclear missiles and other arms un-
der their control with them, the So-
viet foreign minister said yesterday.
A NATO spokesperson welcomed
the announcement by Foreign Min-
ister Eduard Shevardnadze as encour-
aging. U.S. arms negotiator Stephen
Ledogar said the speech was "very
upbeat, very positive," but warned
9 against reading more into the state-
ment than the Kremlin intended.

Shevardnadze's speech came on
the final day of a gathering that pro-
duced a 35-nation human rights ac-
cord. Shevardnadze said the agree-
ment was the product of a changing
relationship between and East and
West. The agreement also called for
freer travel, emigration, speech and
religious practices.
"The Vienna meeting has shaken
up the Iron Curtain, weakened its
rusty supports, made new breaches
in it and hastened its corrosion," he
said, referring to the East-West divi-

sion as Winston Churchill described
it 40 years ago.
"Truth must be visible," said
Shevardnadze in promising that the
Kremlin would publish before the
end of the month a timetable for
troop removal.
Soviet President Mikhail Gor-
bachev, in a unilateral move, an-
nounced in December that Soviet
forces would be cut by 500,000 sol-
diers, including 50,000 stationed in
Eastern Europe.
Shevardnadze said the troops de-

parting Eastern Europe will take
with them "all their organic arma-
ments, including tactical nuclear
systems."
He also said the Soviet Union has
stopped modernizing its short-range
nuclear weapons and called on the
United States to follow suit.
Those arms are tactical missiles
with a range of less than 312 miles.
The Soviet Union and the United
States signed an accord more than a
year ago to eliminate all intermedi-
ate-range nuclear forces, and are

negotiating for deep cuts in strategic
arms.
Ledogar, U.S ambassador to arms
talks that will start in March, said
modernization is an option the
United States would like to keep
until NATO and the Soviet-led War-
saw Pact have an equal number of
troops, and other non-nuclear forces.
"We don't want to abandon the
nuclear leg of the deterrent until we
have a much better situation on
conventional forces," he told the
Associated Press.

During a brief exchange with re-
porters after his speech, Shevard-
nadze made it clear that only short-
range missiles that are part of the
military units to be withdrawn will
be dismantled without conditions.
He said he could not say what
percentage of the Kremlin's short-
range stockpile would remain de-
ployed but that these figures and
others will be released in detail
before the March 9 start of the Con-
ventional Armed Forces in Europe
negotiations.

GEO rallies for support of
new contract, salary raise

BY SCOTT LAHDE
A rally to stir teaching assistants' in-
terest in bargaining their new contracts
yesterday drew more people and enthusi-
asm than the TA union's steering
committee had expected, as about 60
gathered in the Diag.
Carrying signs and chanting, mem-
bers of the Graduate Employees Organiza-
tion attempted to drum up support for
their concerns. For example, the GEO op-
poses the "Ten-Term Rule," which limits
the number of terms a graduate student can
earn money for teaching.
During the rally, students nearing
their tenth term expressed fear that the ten-
term rule will hurt them financially.
The graduate students also demanded
smaller classes and paid training for TAs.
GEO members appealed to the Uni-
versity's Board of Regents yesterday on
the class size issue, asserting that under-
graduate education suffers due to large
class sections.
"TA training is a half step toward
better education, class size is the other
half," said GEO President Don Demetri-
ades.
But generally, the TA ralliers said
they need a salary increase more than any

other concession from the University, be-
cause "most people feel it a big strain to
live here," said Rackham graduate student
Isabelle Byrnes.
"We want the same amount as the
University tuition was increased," said
graduate student Reed Shick.
Assistant Vice President for Academic
Affairs Colleen Dolan-Greene said yester-
day the two sides are scheduled to meet
today at four p.m.
"We are going over the proposal to-
morrow and then we will later submit a
counter-proposal," Greene said.
The GEO has sponsored several rallies
since it was formed in 1975, some garner-
ing as many as 350 people. But this year,
many TAs expected initial support to be
low because contract negotiations have not
yet begun and the issues do not have as
serious impact as the tuition waiver of the
1987-89 contract.
"It will take a while to realize what is
at stake," Byrnes said.
GEO Steering Committee members
encourage graduate students to again sup-
port the GEO in these talks. All of the
approximately 1800 teaching assistants on
campus would be affected by the new con-
tract.

After a brief speech from steering
committee members, the ralliers marched
from the Diag to the Fleming Building, td
show the administration that they want to
begin bargaining immediately.
PASS
IT
Shae the
news,
~ uii,

JESSICA GRFFN: /DaIly
Members of the Graduate Employees Organization, the TAs' union,
demonstrate for consessions from the University. The union will be
negotiating a new contract.

*LaGroc demands more 'U' AIDS research

BY NOELLE SHADWICK
About 30 people chanted "Fight
back! Fight AIDS! Act now!" yes-
terday outside the Michigan Union
before demanding more, and better
publicized AIDS research at the
University's Board of Regents public
comments session.
Members of the Lesbian and Gay
Rights Organizing Committee,
which planned the protest, presented
eight demands to the regents,
Correction
An error occurred in yesterday's
Perspectives column ("Israel and the
world of doublespeak"). The con-
cluding sentence should 'have read,
"And likewise, the trend to be
cautious of, one quite visible in
1982 and 1983, is the charge of anti-
Semitism used in proportion to the
violence Israel inflicts daily on the
Palestinian population- in the Occu-
pied Territories and inside Israel it-
self."
r~~ _CIEW

including full disclosure of Univer-
sity AIDS research, more AIDS re-
search funding, and construction of
an AIDS treatment center.
"It is now 1989, and not one ad-
ministrator has issued a statement
about the role of the University in
understanding the AIDS virus," said
LaGROC member Judy Levy.
The protest came several months
after LaGROC members asked four
University officials for information
on AIDS research at the University,
and were told they would receive the
information by the end of the fall
semester, said LaGROC member
Paul Lefrak.
"We know they're doing a little
bit of research...," Lefrak said,
"we're just not clear on how much...

We believe the University has the
organizational capacity to coordinate
a response," he said.
University officials were divided
on what action was taken on the re-
quest. Division of Research Devel-
opment and Administration Director
Alan Steiss said he sent a list of ex-
ternally funded AIDS research pro-
jects to the University administra-
tion sometime between November
and December.
He was unsure, though, if the re-
port went to Acting Affirmative Ac-
tion Office Director Mary Ann
Swain, who he later thought was in
charge of collecting all of the infor-
mation.
Swain said she neverreceived a
report and had the impression that to

compile a comprehensive list of all
AIDS projects would take a long
time, and she had had no reason to
require such a report.
LaGROC members said they sent
requests for the information to both
Swain and Steiss.
University AIDS research is be-
ing conducted at the Schools of
Medicine, Public Health, Dentistry,
and Pharmacy.
"We're certainly not insensitive
to the problem of AIDS...," said Dr.
Joseph Glorioso, medical school as-
sistant dean for research.

PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS
PSI CHI
The National Honors Society in Psychology
is now accepting applications
Requirements include:
-12 graded credits in Psychology beyond intro level
- Major or Minor in Psychology
- 3.3 Overall GPA
- 3.5 GPA in Psychology (including stats)
DEADLINE IS JANUARY 27, 1989
Pick up Applications in K-106 West Quad

S " " " " " " "" " ""." " " "

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INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS FOR:
Spring-Summer 1989
Study Abroad Programs are as follows:

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FULL MOON IN BLUE WATER
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THE JANUARY MAN -9
112:30, 2:50, 5:05, 7:25, 9:45, 12:15
DEEP STAR SIX
TALK RADIO
2:55, 9:35, 11:45
GLEAMING THE CUBE
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MISSISSIPPI BURNING
1:20, 4:00, 7:20, 9:45, 12:10

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FLORENCE, SPRING
(Intensive Italian Language)
Monday January 23, 3:00 P.M.
MLB 4th Floor Commons
ST. MALO, SUMMER
(French language program)
Monday January 23, 4:30 P.M.
MLB 3rd Floor Commons
OXFORD, SUMMER
Wednesday January 25, 4:00 P..M.
Haven Hall, 7th Floor Lounge
LONDON, SUMMER
Thursday January 26, 7:00 P.M.
Tappan Hall, Room 180
PARIS, SPRING
Monday January 30, 4:00 P.M.
MLB 4th Floor Commons
FLORENCE, SUMMER
Tuesday January 31, 4:00 P.M.
MLB 4th Floor Commons
SEVILLE, SUMMER
Tuesday January 31, 4:00 P.M.
MLB Room B-116

THE ACCIDENTAL TOURIST
12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:20, 9:30, 11:40
,w P WORKING GIRL
12:50, 3:00, 5:10, 7:50, 10:00
RAIN MAN
1:30, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55, 12:30
TWINS 9
1:25, 3:30, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50, 11:50 |

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