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January 20, 1989 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-20

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0
In Weked Maazie

Is Proposition 48 racist? " Dick Vitale rocks and
rolls in Ann Arbor - A resum6 writer confronts life

Wteirtotrni
Ninety-nine years of editorialfreedom

Adk -

Vol. IC, No. 79

Ann Arbor, Michigan.- Friday, January 20, 1989

Copyright 1989, The Michigan Daily

Regents

may

cut

MSA funds

ROBIN LOZNAK/Daily
Students demand more University AIDS research in front of the Union yesterday. Members of Lesbian and Gay Rights
Organizing Committee presented eight demands to the University's Board of Regents during the board's public comments
meeting. See story, page 3.
'U'task force to study costs

BY FRAN OBEID
The Michigan Student Assembly
will lose its University funds if
work relations do not improve be-
tween MSA officers and the
administration consultant, members
of the University's Board of Regents
said yesterday during their monthly
meeting.
Last spring, the regents passed an
amendment in response to what Re-
gent Thomas Roach (D-Saline)
called "student criticism of MSA"
requiring that the assembly "engage
in a consultative way with Student
Organization Development Center
(SODC)," and decreased MSA funds
by 37 cents per student.
But yesterday, Vice President for
Student Affairs Henry Johnson told
the regents that MSA did not make a
complete effort to work with Acting
SODC Director Brad Borland.
Borland then told the regents that
the assembly was "reluctant to take
advice from those they should be
working with and to meet half way."
Johnson suggested that the re-
gents withhold judgment on the as-
sembly until new MSA officers
prove they are "making some head-
way" during their annual fee request
in June. MSA holds student-wide
elections for officers in March.
But MSA officials say the SODC
criticism is undue. "I believe it's in-
appropriate for MSA to rely on
someone from the administration to
provide input or advice," said Vice
President Susan Overdorf, an LSA
junior. "I don't feel that SODC
knows as much as the students
working at MSA. MSA is a student

organization - we're supposed to be
autonomous from the administra-
tion."
Overdorf said SODC officials
wanted to meet with the student
leaders on a weekly basis and the
student officers, who are volunteers,
simply don't have time for another
meeting.
MSA President Mike Phillips, an
LSA senior, said, "The regents ma-
nipulate, twist arms, and force stu-
dents to do what they want. I don't
care what the regents think. I'm a
volunteer student. The SODC is 4
useless administrative branch. The
regents don't know what's going
on."
During yesterday's meeting,
Roach suggested that Student Legal
Services, ADVICE magazine, and
the Ann Arbor Tenants Union -
groups which obtain funding
through the assembly - start look-
ing for alternative funding sources
because the regents may vote to take
away MSA funds.
Phillips, though, said SLS relies
on the assembly for funds as well as
organization. MSA's Vice President
serves as head of the SLS Board, and
the group receives 60 percent of its
funding from MSA, he added.
Tenants Union member and LSA
junior Lisa Russ agreed, saying at-
tempts to find alternative funding
would be futile. "We work a lot with
low income people and students,"
she said. "Our budget is $30,000. If
they are talking about looking out-
side the University, they are talking
about closing the Tenants Union."

BY DAVID SCHWART Z
Finding ways to cut wasteful
University spending - thereby re-
ducing increases in student tuition
- will be the goal of a special task
force approved yesterday by the
University's Board of Regents.
In addition, the task force will be
charged with discovering why the
cost of higher education has in-
creased so rapidly in recent years,
often faster than the rate of inflation.
"The University is prepared to do
its part to control costs and to take
measures to constrain costs," said

University President James
Duderstadt, who proposed the task
force. "(But) until we understand
what's causing these costs, we're not
going to be able to constrain them."
Provost and Vice President for
Academic Affairs Charles Vest will
head the task force and give a
preliminary report to the regents by
the end of the year.
Vest said he is unsure who will
serve on the task force, but added
that he hoped to tap cost-cutting ex-'
perts from the business world.
LSA sophomore Julie Murray, a

leader of the student group
MI$$ION: Tuition, expressed hope
that cutting unnecessary costs would
result in fewer student tuition in-
creases.
- "(Cost cutting) is one of
MI$$ION: Tuition's objectives be-
cause the regents claim every
summer that they don't have enough
money, yet they do extravagant
things, like Duderstadt's house."
Last fall, the University spent
$500,000 to renovate Duderstadt's
presidential residence, which the
University owns.

- 44yr -1 -- .-- - -IL -

"If we're in such a tight situation,
these things shouldn't be done," said
Murray, who is also chair of the
Michigan Student Assembly's Stu-
dent Rights Committee.
Although many students and
administrators expressed guarded
optimism for the effectiveness of the
task force, MSA President Michael
Phillips, an LSA senior, deemed the
task force "useless," saying the cuts
that are needed can be made within
the administration.
See Costs, Page 2

Bush will reassess
US-Soviet relations

Celebrators, protesters

WASHINGTON (AP) -
President-elect Bush said yesterday
he does not believe "we risk losing
momentum" in arms-reduction talks
with the Soviet Union because of
his unreadiness to agree to a definite
timetable.
"I think the Soviets understand
that my intention is not to drag my
feet but to simply do a prudent re-
assessment," Bush said in an
interview with a group of news
agencies on the eve of his inaugura-
tion.
The vice president also indicated
he was not ready to commit to a
summit meeting this year with
Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev. "I
don't think progress should be
measured solely on whether there's a
Student
arrested
for LSD
BY ALEX GORDON
A University student was arrested
on three drug-related charges Wed-
nesday, after allegedly selling 1,000
"hits" of LSD to county drug
enforcement agents, a state police
spokesperson said yesterday.
Christopher Brown is being held
in the Washtenaw County Jail with
a $100,000 bond after he was ar-
raigned in the 15th district court
* yesterday. Court officials would not

summit meeting," he said.
On another subject, Bush said
that a tape which the State Depart-
ment says it has of a New Year's
Day statement by Yasser Arafat
appears to be, "from what I've read
... a setback to peace rather than an
enhancement of peace."
The State Department said on
Wednesday that it had a tape of
Arafat, the leader of the Palestinian
Liberation Organization, that
amounted to a threat against moder-
ate Arabs. Bush said he had not heard
the tape but wants to know more
about it.
Bush still said he supports Presi-
dent Reagan's decision to open a
dialogue with the PLO, and "that
policy will not change" in his presi-

gear for
BY PATRICK STAIGER
WITH WIRE REPORTS
On the day of swearing in the
41st president of the United States,
pomp, circumstance, celebration -
and protest - set the tone for the
inaugural events.
At the University, student
Republicans are not planning local
events, but about 100 received invi-
tations to attend inaugural activities
in Washington, said LSA senior
Navid Mahmoodzadegan.
"We're absolutely optimistic
about what the new president will
bring us," said Mahmoodzadegan.
But several student organizations
plan to protest the inauguration at
the Federal Building at 4 p.m.

inauguration

"We're trying to represent an al-
ternative that reflects real needs, not
the needs of the rich," said Latin
American Solidarity Committee
member David Austin. "The fact that
50 percent of the people didn't vote
shows that something is wrong."
"It's important from day one that
Bush knows that people are watch-
ing him," Austin said.
For the past week, Michigan Re-
publicans have been enjoying a week
of celebration. Wednesday night,
more than 1,000 Michigan Republi-
cans crowded the capital this week to
join the round of parties, receptions,
and spectacles culminating in a
$1,500-a-plate Republican dinner.
"It's a reward for party faithfuls

Bush...
is inaugurated today
dency.
Bush said that in his inaugural
address today he would issue "a broad
appeal to the American people to
pitch in and help."

involved in the election, for the Re-
publican Party and activists and
George Bush diehards," said Rep.
Bill Schuette, a Republican repre-
senting north-central Michigan.
But while 2,500 Republican
stalwarts and wealthy contributors
feasted on a $1,500-a-plate dinner
and toasted George Bush's presi-
dency, protesters outside chanted
"Feed the Poor, Not the Rich" and
"What About the Homeless?"
Several hundred protestors
demonstrated for three hours, shout-
ing at the limousines that pulled up
to the main entrance, and dispersed
peacefully as the dinner began in the
mid-evening.
Inside, the black-tie guests ex-
pressed little concern about the mes-
sage the demonstrators were shout-
ing.
"I feel it's ridiculous," said
Thomas J. Stewart, a Seattle busi-
See Bush. Paste 2

Area groups
mark Roe v.
Wade ruling
BY NICOLE SHAW
Tomorrow's 16th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the
Supreme Court's landmark decision legalizing abor-
tion, will pit campus and national activist groups
against each other as they rally for their fervent beliefs.
Right to Life of Washtenaw County will protest
the legalization of abortion tonight at 7 p.m. on the
steps of the Michigan Union. The rally will not only
protest the Roe v. Wade decision, but also "celebrate
the right to life victory we had in Missouri," said Rae
Ann Houbeck, chair of the Washtenaw County group.

IQV ~ $~

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