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December 05, 1988 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Haunted
House
helps
1chil1dren
BY MIGUEL CRUZ
Not all spirits of the night are
evil.
The ghosts and goblins that
frightened students on Halloween
weekend split $2,400 in profits be-
tween Mott Children's Hospital and
UNICEF on Friday.
The money, proceeds from the
annual Tri-Service ROTC Haunted
House, was the result of a coopera-
tive effort between the Air Force,
Army, and Navy units. The Air
Force coordinated the event, the
Navy handled publicity, and the
Army did the acting.
Joscelin Alexander, Public Affairs
Officer of the Arnold Air Society, an
Air Force service organization, was
pleased with this year's Haunted
House.
"It was very successful and that's
reflected in the amount of money we
raised," she said. They collected over
$3,500, of which $800 covered ma-
terial costs, $300 was set aside for
next year's event, and $2,400 was
donated to the two charities.
According to Alexander, who co-
ordinated this year's Haunted House,
about 135 students, starting in
September, spent their Saturday and
Sunday mornings from 8 to noon
publicizing, building, and organizing
the event.
Brent Chrite of the Mott Hospital
Administration accepted the donation
on the hospital's behalf. He said the
5 money will most likely be used ei-

The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 5, 1988-- Page 5
Right-to-die gets
mixed reactions

BY VERA SONGWE
Your mother is terminally ill,
hooked up indefinitely on a life sup-
port system. Under Michigan law,
neither she nor her relatives can do
anything to stop it.
But a new bill passed by the state
House last week would change that:
patients could designate an 'advocate'
who would be legally able to deny
the life support. The bill now goes
to the state Senate.
The 'right to die' bill, pushed by
Sen. David Hollister (R-Lansing) for
12 years, would serve to protect
physicians, said philosophy Prof.
Carl Cohen, who specializes in
medical ethics.
"If such a person's authority is
established in law, the hospital is
protected," he said. When asked if
the bill will have an effect on the
University Hospitals, he said, "it is
not infrequently that we have cases
where such a decision could be
needed."
Rev. Will Stevenson of Saint
Mary's student chapel said the
church officially believes in "a per-
son's right to die."
"Artificial life support has created
a big challenge in the field of medi-
cal ethics," he said, "but the issue
here was whether life should be sus-
tained by artificial means or not."
Stevenson emphasized the differ-
ence between pulling the plug on
someone already on a life support
system and not putting a patient on

one at all.
"Pulling the plug is much more
difficult," said Mackey Mark, a first-
year medical student. "If I believe as
a physician that the patient is termi-
nally ill, I will refer him to another
physician and make a decision there-
after."
Mackey said the bill was a "good
step in some cases and very danger-
ous in others, because it is difficult
to know when a disease is terminal."
Rev. Stevenson expressed some
concern over how the 'advocate' is
chosen and the fact that the whole
family might not be in favor of such
a decision. Also, he said, the
'advocate' may have other interests
at heart. "Inheritance and other per-
sonal issues might get in the way of
the decision," he said.
But Cohen said, "It is extremely
unlikely for that to happen because
the advocate is appointed by the per-
son... if we cannot trust that person,
who will we trust?"
Opponents of the bill are primar-
ily right-to-life forces who think
doctors should not be barred froml
providing food and water if that
would result in the death of a pa-;
tient.
Hollister said if the bill does not
clear the state Senate before the end
of the session, he will pursue it
again next session.

JESSICA GREENE/Daily
An ROTC vampire swoops towards visitors at the annual Tri-service Haunted House. The
event, which took place in October, raised $2,400 for UNICEF and Mott Children's Hospital.

ther for the new Maternal & Child
Health Care Center currently under
construction, or for a children's heart
fund.
While $1200 may seem like a
drop in the bucket for a hospital
system with an annual budget in the
hundreds of millions, Chrite said
that since the University Medical
Center receives no state funds, each
dollar is important. And, he said, it's

"that much more appreciated when
students take time out of their
schedules" to raise the money.
The Haunted House is held in
North Hall, the current home of the

ROTC program and original site of
the University Hospital. It takes
place in the basement, which was
appropriately the first hospital's
morgue.

JUST A SHORT WALK
FROM CENTRAL CAMPUS

"I"

A-(

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

\ '' J"

BOOK SHOP SALE
Monday
Dec. 5 --10-8
$3/bag

m

RECREATIONAL SPORTS
SKI WAX CLINIC-
LEARN THE BASICS OF WAXING YOUR
X-COUNTRY SKIIS.
Get ready for the Winter Season so you can take full
advantage of the Ann Arbor area cross country
ski trails
Tuesday, December 6
7pm - 8:30pm
North Campus Recreation Building
$5.00 Clinic Fee
Call 764-3967 for more information
Considering
the University of Michigan
School of Education
for graduate studies
Come to a meeting:
Wed., Dec. 7, 6 p.m.
Room 1322 (Tribute Room)
School of Education Bldg.
Faculty and staff will be available to answer
questions about programs, financial aid
opportunities, and admission requirements.
To reserve a space, call:
Office of Academic Services
(313) 764-7563
1228 School of Education Bldg.
University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Mon. Guest Lecture by John Shepard,
December 5 Carleton University
"Teaching Popular Music in a University
Music School"
Rackham East Conference Room, 4:00 p.m.
FREE

" Nautilus * Raquetball courts " Free Weights
" Two Pools " Dance studios " Fitness Testing
" Gymnasium " Excercise bikes " Qualified instructors
CONVENIENT MONTHLY MEMBERSHIPS-
OPEN 7 DAYS 350 S. Fifth Ave.
A WEEK! 663-0536

A

BOOK SHOP RE-OPENS JAN. 14
Ann Arbor Public Library--Fifth at William
Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
(VITA)

Volunteers needed -

- No Experience Necessary -

Mass Meeting

Monday, December

5,

1988

0

7:00 PM.

Anderson Rooms, The Michigan Union

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Composers Forum
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