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November 29, 1988 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-29

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Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 29, 1988

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Same old story: Spikers

drop pair to
BY STEVEN COHEN
The Michigan women's volleyball team closed out its
season on Friday and Saturday night at the IM Building
in a pattern that was all too familiar for the Wolverines.
They lost both matches.
Against Northwestern (19-14 overall, 10-7 Big Ten)
on Friday night, the Wolverines displayed their best and
worst sides in a five-set match.
Northwestern defeated Michigan, 15-13, 15-9, 11-15,
3-15, and 15-12. This marked the second time this
season the Wolverines (11-23, 1-17) have lost a five-set
match to the Wildcats.
"We played pretty well on Friday night," Michigan
coach Joyce Davis said. "It was a gutsy performance to
come back from 0-2. I was pretty happy with their
performance."
True to form, Michigan led in several statistical
categories. Julia Sturm and Karen Marshall sparked a
strong Wolverine attack with 15 and 14 kills,
respectively. Senior Marie Ann Davidson had 42 assists,

a end season
a team season high.I
The Wolverines, who finished the season as the best
blocking team in the conference, dominated in that
category. Sturm and Carla Hunter led Michigan which
had 10 solo blocks compared to Northwestern's zero.

The following night against Wisconsin (16-16, 7-11),
the Wolverines repeated the result of the two teams'
previous encounter. For the second time this season,
Michigan lost in three games to the Badgers. Wisconsin
defeated Michigan, 15-4, 15-7, and 15-3. Wisconsin had
12 service aces.
"They just out and out outplayed us from start to
finish," said Davis. "We had a lot of problems receiving
the ball. Serve receiving is a problem that has plagued us
all season. Those matches we received serves well, we
played well. When we didn't, we were unable to execute
our offense.
"That's one thing we'll spend a lot of time on in the
off-season."
" Lions

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'M' holds
11th slot;
Irish still
tops AP
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michigan remained ranked No. 11
in this week's Associated Press
college football poll.
Notre Dame, fresh from a 27-10
victory over Southern California in
their 1-2 shootout, was a near-
unanimous choice as the nation's top
team.
The setback dropped Southern Cal
from second place to fifth and cost
the Trojans their shot at the natioal
championship.
DEFENDING national
champion Miami (Fla.), an 18-16
winner over previously unbeaten
Arkansas, moved up from third place
to second and West Virginia, Notre
Dame's Jan. 2 Fiesta Bowl foe,
jumped from fourth to third. It was
the highest ranking ever in the AP
poll's 53-year history for the
Mointaineers, who, like Notre Dame,
completed an 11-0 regular season for
the first time.
Notre Dame, which is No. 1 for
the fifth consecutive week, received
57 of 60 first-place votes and 1,197
of a possible 1,200 points from a
nationwide panel of sports writers,
and sportscasters.
Miami, whose only loss was 31-
30 at Notre Dame when the
Hurricanes disdained an almost
certain tie with 45 seconds left and
tried a two-point conversion pass that
failed, received one first-place vote
and 1,124 points. The Hurricanes (9-
1) conclude their regular season
Saturday against Brigham Young.

THE OTHER two first-place
votes went to West Virginia, which
totaled 1,069 points.
Florida State, which finished
second to Miami a year ago but has
won 10 straight since an opening-
game 31-0 loss to the Hurricanes,
trounced Florida 52-17 and climbed
from fifth to fourth with 1,013
points, followed. by 10-1 Southern
Cal with 946 points.
Nebraska (11-1) held onto sixth
place with 891 points and Auburn
(10-1) a 15-10 winner over Alabama,
remained seventh with 865 points.
UCLA (9-2) rose from ninth place to
eighth with 731 points, barely
edging Arkansas (10-1) which slipped
from eighth to ninth with 731.
points.
Oklahoma (9-2) again rounded out
the Top 10 with 649 points.
The second 10 consists of
Michigan, Oklahoma State,
Clemson, Houston, Wyoming,
Louisiana State, Washington State,
Syracuse, Georgia, and Alabama.

4

up for
grabs
PONTIAC (AP) - Detroit;
quarterback Chuck Long got a vote
of confidence from interim coach
Wayne Fontes, but no guarantee he
would be anything more than the
Lions' interim quarterback.
Long, who missed six games with
an injured left knee, got his first start
against the Minnesota Vikings on
Thanksgiving Day, but he was so
ineffective that Fontes relieved him
with free agent Rusty Hilger late in
the second quarter.
The Vikings controlled the ball
for nearly 45 minutes and held the
Lions to a mere 60 yards in total
offense and three first downs in a 23-
0 victory.
"The quarterback situation is day
to day this week," Fontes said
yesterday at his weekly press
conference. "We've got to get better.
The one who practices best will start
Sunday against Green Bay."
Against the Vikings, Long
completed two of six passes for five
yards while Hilger completed four of
14 passes for 43 yards.
"The bottom line is that we've
got to get our quarterbacks to see
what we want them to see," Fontes M
said. "We had more people open than -
the Vikings did. Our quarterbacks
just didn't see them."
Fontes, who is 1-1 after inheriting
a 2-9 record from Darryl Rogers on
Nov. 14, acknowledged that the
problem didn't develop overnight.
"You need a quarterback coach,"
Fontes said. "I think all quarterbacks
need that. They need a teacher like
anyone else. Even a golfer like Jack
Nicklaus - he still goes to a pro
when he needs help with his swing."
Sources close to the Lions say
that during Rogers' tenure, only
offensive coordinator Bob Baker -
who was fired along with Rogers -
was allowed to answer questions
from Long; veteran quarterback Eric
Hipple was never permitted to offer
advice.
But the fault isn't all with the
quarterbacks. The Lions running
backs have been ineffective and their
tight ends haven't caught a pass jn
four games.

e or
nith
ad-
[of

I
elf,
nt
ur

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN CENTER FOR
RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES
presents the fourth lecture in a series on
Perestroika and Gorbachev
"Gorbachev's Perestroika: What's in it for the West?"
DR. EDWARD A. HEWETT
Rackham Amphitheatre, 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, November 30
Dr. Hewett is a senior fellow at the Brooking Institution and is
internationally known as an authority on Soviet energy policies.
Dr. Hewett received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of
Michigan and is the author of Energy, Economics, and Foreign
Policy in the Soviet Union, and Reforming the Soviet Economy:
Economy Versus Efficiency (1988).
For further information contact CREES, 764-0351

ules,

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