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November 21, 1988 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-21

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Gents

BY BETH COLQUITT
Superb voices and a great deal of
enthusiasm made the Soph Show's
production of Grease a real treat. All
the lead roles were well cast, with
especially strong performances from
Steve Jasgur (Danny), Janet Caine
(Marty), Cathy Obeid (Frenchy), Ira
Caplan (Kenickie), and Mitchel Adler
(Sonny). I was quite impressed with
Jodi Lustig's voice and her portrayal
of Rizzo, both of which were strong
and expressive.
Obeid as Frenchy - pink hair and
all - stole the scene every time she
was onstage. She made funny,
descriptive gestures and the most
wonderful faces, with wide eyes and
smiles all the time. Frenchy's male
counterpart among the Burger Palace
Boys (the Greasers) was Sonny, and
Adler did a terrific job, overflowing
with enthusiasm and obviously
having a great time with the role.
Another person obviously enjoy-

The Soph Show
production of
Grease
transformed a
captive audience
into Teen Angels.
ing his part was the Teen Angel
(David Love). For humor, this scene
stole the show. Love obviously had a
great sense of humor about his role,
not taking it seriously, but keeping a
perfectly straight face. Not only does
he have remarkably flexible voice in
range and style, but his stage
presence was polished and, well,
sparkling. Adding to this fantastic
number was Frenchy, giving a per-
fect show of the confused teenager.
.The staging of the musical worked
well. In particular the use of the
actors in the 3-D movie in "Alone at
a Drive-In Movie" was quite funny.
The actors in the "movie" stand
against a movie screen, then move
off-screen to surround the abandoned
Danny, singing at him as he laments
Sandy's departure. The choreography
was also excellent, and faltered only a
bit at the Hand-Jive contest, which
was overly ambitious. The dancers
were given some flashy steps but
were unable to give them the flair
that was needed to be absolutely
convincing.

I

BY SHEALA DURANT
"I think it's more true to life than some
like to admit," said Sonya -Davidson,
member at last Thursday's performanc
Wesley's drama, The Mighty Gents.
The Mighty Gents realistically toldt
group of young Black men, former gang
upon reaching the age of thirty realize
somehow passed them by. Some of them
found a better life, others saw what anothe
like, but didn't choose it - "they deliber
off the edge of the cliff... I've never been cc
why."
The play was directed by Charles J
coordinates the Black Theatre Studies pt
University. LSA senior Rick Tittsworth le
strong performance as Frankie Sojourner,
the Mighty Gents and the play's protagon
struggles with his identity and manhood, ft
that justify the oppression of the weak an
only the strong will survive.
Three of the other Mighty Gents includ
by Jeff Kolcon (Nov.10-13) and Kenneth J
17-20), Lucky, David Campbell and Eld
Williams, who were quite convincing
college acting performances of aging g
without jobs, few positive prospects for thi
need to maintain their dignity in a world c
oppression. LSA Senior Charles Heckstal

Rebecca Shubert as Sandy was
good, but until the last number she
was a contrast to the rest of the cast
because of her general timidity
onstage. Her voice, although lovely
for Sandra Dee, wasn't quite up to
"All Choked Up" at the end of the
show. Her stage presenceduring this
song was excellent, however.
"We Go Together," which is an
excellent song anyway, looked
wonderful. It is performed twice, first
at the conclusion of the first act,
without Sandy, and then a reprise at
the end of the show (Sandy included).
It looked like so much fun that I
wanted to get up and dance.
There were also many smaller
superbly acted roles. Patty Simcox
(Jennifer Thompson), the goody-
goody cheerleader, and Johnny
Casino (Bob Saxton) were spec-
tacular testimony to the depth of the
production. Soph Show'sGrease,
bursting with energy and talent, was
a wonderful evening's entertainment.

The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 21, 1988 - Page 9
prove migh
his portrayal of Braxton, a suave gangster and Frankie's
rival as a teen and an adult, and Composer/Sound
people would Designer Stephen Newbey did an excellent job with thy
an audience music.
e of Richard The only female role in the play was the pivotal role
of Rita, Frankie's wife. Rita was played Nov. 10-13 and
19-20 by School of Music graduate student Alicia Hunter
the story of a and November 17 and 18 by understudy and LSA senior
members who Jillvonnie Flowers. Flowers, in her first acting role,
that life has worked well, delivering an emotional monologue
,Wesley said, detailing her life as a "deb" during her days with the
r life could be young Mighty Gents. Rita mentions that she was born
rately walked
ompletely sure in the land of the sun - representing Africa - and is
seen knitting a shawl which she says will protect her
from the "cold," or the oppression faced by Blacks in the
ackson, who United States. Rita is trying to "knit" a value system.for
rogram at the Blacks that was somehow lost during slavery.
d the cast in a The play had few slow moments, and even those were
the leader of balanced by several powerful scenes that sometimes
ist. Sojourner commanded immediate applause from the audience eveti
ollowing rules before they were over. One of these scenes was Frankie's
d believes that youthful confrontation with his father, played by Charles
Dixon.
Jackson invited area school children to the pdr-
e Tiny played formances to give them an appreciation for theatre and to
Johnson (Nov. show that if they "continue to live for today and live for
ridge, Jeffrey these instant hollow victories," they will not have a
in their first future. S..
ang members The Mighty Gents was a powerful performance, well
e future, and a acted by a young and enthusiastic cast, and giving an al-
f poverty and too-real look at what Jackson feels is "an element of the,
11 was bold in Black experience in America that has been forgotten."

Art
Continued from Page 7
doorway - so important to them.
"Manoa Tupapau" or "Spirit of the
Dead Keeps Watch" is an arresting
example of Gauguin's style. Prim-
itive and symbolic, it is filled with
the mystery of the tribal folklore or
the Tahitian people. Another
noteworthy work is Cezanne's lith-
ograph, "The Bathers." As this is the
only drawing done in color, it
immediately claims special attention.
The color is bold and easily differ-

entiated; this, along with Cezanne's
rounded brushstroke, creates his form.
His use of earth tones suggests aI
more realistic delineation of nature
while his heavily muscled figures
stand like heroes drawn from the
classical tradition.'
Such an overview of the creativity
and insights of the great pillars of the
artistic world cannot be easily passed

up. If you have even a half hour to
spare before the Thanksgiving rush4
make certain to catch this exhibit.
The exhibit will run through
November 27th. The museum is open
Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. ard
Saturday-Sunday 1-5p.m.
Admission is free.

G0~ i
Gianni
Continued from Page 8
death of Buoso. Even the younger
children dashing around were
charming.
What also made this production
special were the lighting and the
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

costumes. In Suor Angelica, the
lighting created a special divine pre-
sence that was uplifting and beautiful
to see. The costumes in both operas
were appropriate and beautifully
designed, from the nuns' habits to
the relatives' exquisite outfits.
The use of Supertitles, com-
parable to subtitles in a movie, were
helpful and effective, not distracting.
The audience was able to follow what
was being sung while still enjoying
the original Italian.
Those of you who missed Suor
Angelica and Gianni Schicchi, mis-
sed something special. You may not
get the chance to laugh or cry this
hard for some time.

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WHAT'S
A. HAPPENING
RECREATIONAL SPORTS
IM WRESTLING MEET November 29, 30, and
December 1, 1988
7pm - lpm Sports Coliseum
ENTRIES DUE: Tues., November 29 4:30pm
Intramural Sports Building
WRESTLING MEET WEIGHT-INS
Tuesday, November 29
10:00am - 5:00pm
Intramural Sports Building
University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Mon. Michigan Youth Symphony/Band/
November 21 Chamber Choir
Louis Bergonzi, Donald Schleicher, David Jorlett,
conductors
Program includes madrigals, band music by:
Shoshtakovich, Hanson; and Vaughan Williams
"Fantasia on Greensleeves"; Brahms "Adademic
Overture"; Sibelius "Finlandia"
Hill, 7:30 p.m.
FREE
Tues. University Symphony Orchestra
November 22 Richard Rosenberg, conductor, and student conductors
Mozart: Overture to "La.Clemenza di Tito"
Schumann: Symphony No. 1
Swanson: "Dromenon"
Debussy: "La Mer"
Hill, 8:00 p.m.
FREE
For up-to-date program information on School of Music events call the 24-Hour
Music Hotline, 763-4726
It s Our Lucky 7th'Birthiday
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