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November 21, 1988 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-21

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 21, 1988

Local
groups
battle
hunger
BY KRISTIN HOFFMAN
Last Thursday, 70 people sat
down to dinner. Some of them left
hungrier than others.
,The dinner represented the un-
equal distribution of food throughout
the world. A few participants repre-
senting the United States ate fried
chicken, salad, pop, and ice cream.
Most of the group, representing
Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin
America, ate beans and rice. Dinner
was followed by a discussion in
which the group looked at causes and
solutions to world hunger.
The meal, sponsored by World
Hunger Education and Thanksgiving
(WjIEAT) and World Hunger Educa-
tion Action Committee (WHE-AC),
brought to a close the Fast for World
Harvest, an annual event sponsored
by'Ox-fam, a group which combats
hunger by promoting agricultural
development and education.
John Hammock, executive direc-
torof Ox-fam, spoke during the two
hour event. In an interview, Ham-
mock stressed grassroots participa-
tion, as Ox-fam depends upon these
events for most of its funds. With
these funds, Ox-fam works interna-
tionally to provide tools and educa-
tioh to rural people who are unable
to :grow sufficient food for them-
selves.
The Fast for World Harvest aims

Ox-fam Executive Director John Hammock leads a discussion
distribution of food between First and Third World nations.

to educate and raise funds. On the
day of the fast, individuals are asked
to forego meals and contribute the
money that would have been spent
on food to Ox-fam. Local groups do
the organizing, and Ox-fam provides
free buttons, stickers, and educa-
tional materials.
Ox-fam is private and non-profit.
Unlike many other international de-
velopment organizations, it does not
receive any money from the U.S.
government, and is free to take
stances that conflict with current
foreign policy.
Hammock said that "the most
difficult problems are the economic
and political policies of the First
World, which make growing food in

the Third World difficult." Debt bur-
dens and war are often the biggest
obstacles to third world production
of staple food crops.
Hammock emphasized Ox-fam's
ability to provide developmental
help, disaster relief, take political
stands, educate, and mobilize volun-
teers. For Hammock, "It's the vol-
unteers that are exciting; it's all done
by individuals giving their time and
resources to help individuals who are
in need."
Last month, Hammock
accompanied a cargo plane that de-
livered supplies to the town of
Bluefields, Nicaragua, which was
devastated by Hurricane Joan. Relief
supplies were provided by local

JESSICA GREENE/Doily
Thursday about the unequal
groups in New York, Washington
D.C., and Miami. Despite Ox-fam's
fears, the plane was not stopped in
Miami, even though there is a U.S.
embargo on goods to Nicaragua.
When Hammock visited Cambo-
dia last March, he realized that Ox-
fam needed to do more than provide
developmental aid. When he returned
to New York, he and Dith Pran, the
New York Times reporter whose life
was portrayed in the film, The
Killing Fields, organized a three-day
vigil and fast in front of the United
Nations in protest of current U.S.
policy recognizing the Pol Pot
regime. They also called for the
withdrawal of Vietnamese forces
from Cambodia, and requested U.N.
aid to the country.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Dems. want new timetable
PHOENIX - The Democrats may ask Congress to help change the
campaign calendar for the 1992 presidential election to diminish the
pitfalls of Iowa and New Hampshire.
One change that has widespread support among party officials is to
alter the campaign calendar. The principal target would be Iowa, which
traditionally has begun the delegate selection process.
To many Democrats, the Iowa caucuses are an exercise in special-
interest politics that push candidates into positions that leave them
vulnerable to attack in the general election campaign.
The solution now being debated is a federal law dealing with the
timing of presidential primaries and caucuses.
Gaining favor among Democrats is the idea of a lottery to determine
the states that would lead off the process.
Palestinian man dies in raid
JERUSALEM - Troops raided Palestinian settlements in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip yesterday, fatally shooting a 22-year-old man and
wounding six Arab youths in clashes, Arab hospital officials said.
Five Palestinians suffered beating injuries during an army raid in the
West Bank village of Madama, Arab doctors said.
The army command confirmed that there was "activity" in Madama but
said it had no reports of injuries.
Three Israelis suffered injuries when buses they were riding in were
pelted with rocks in the West Bank.
An accident which killed an Israeli soldier and injured four others in
Lebanon was called "a road accident" by an army spokesperson, who de-
clined to elaborate.
Meanwhile, underground PLO leaders distributed leaflets praising the
declaration of an independent Palestinian state last week by the Palestine
National Council.
Philippine police put on alert
MANILA, Philippines - Officials placed the military and police on
nationwide alert yesterday, the eve of a planned transport strike in Manila,
media reports said.
The state-run Philippines News Agency and the government's Radio of
the Nation said the military chief Gen. Renato De Villa issued the order
to prevent violence during Monday's planned strike by a militant trans-
port group.
De Villa said armed troops would ride buses in the capital today and
military trucks would prowl the streets to assist commuters stranded by
the strike.
There was no explanation why the military was placed on nationwide
alert when the strike was called only for the Manila area.
But today is also President Corazon Aquino's 1,000th day in office,
and military sources have said opponents may try to foment unrest to
divert attention from official ceremonies marking the date.
American hostage failed to
escape; captors gave beating
NEW YORK - Alann Steen, one of nine American hostages being
held in Lebanon, was caught and beaten when he tried to escape his
terrorist captors, the Nov. 28 issue of Newsweek magazine reported.
Fellow hostage Mithileshwar Singh, who was freed in October, told
U.S. officials that Steen managed to get away from his captors, but he
was spotted and turned in by neighbors in the Beirut suburb where he was
held last year.
Singh and Steen were among four teachers captured from Beirut
University College in January 1987. The teachers were kept within
Beirut, usually chained and sometimes blindfolded.
Singh told U.S. officials he was treated better than the Americans
because he is an Indian national, although he has U.S. resident status.
The hostages had expected to be released around Election Day or the
presidential Inaugural in January, Singh said.

10

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Hussein accuses Israel,
U.S. of hindering peace

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AMMAN, Jordan (AP) - King
Hussein said yesterday the PLO has
met American conditions for a place
in Arab-Israeli peace talks and sug-
gested Israel and the United States
were blocking peace.
"I believe the PLO has gone as
far as it was asked to go and has
contributed its share for progress to-
ward a just and comprehensive
peace," the king said.
The PLO's policy-setting Pales-
tine National Council last week en-
dorsed U.N. Security Council
resolutions 242 and 338 which call

for an Israeli withdrawal from the
territories it captured in 1967 on the
West Bank and Gaza strip and nego-
tiations for a just and durable peace.
It also endorsed the Cairo Decla-
ration, which calls for an end to 21
years of worldwide Israeli-PLO un-
derground warfare and restricts guer-
rilla operations to military targets in
Israel and the occupied territories.
Israel officially rejected the coun-
cil's move, saying the organization
has not recognized Israel nor re-
nounced terrorism.

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Y
EXTRAS
Two-term mayor retires at 16
CRABB, Texas - The former mayor of Crabb no longer has to
worry about incorporationreferendums or road repairs. His first priority is
just to finish high school.
"I'm taking one day at a time," said Brian Zimmerman, 16. "I
haven't made my mind up about whether to go to college or what to
study."
Zimmerman was elected mayor at age 11 in this uncorporated town
southwest of Houston, serving two terms after defeating two adults in the
race. His parents said he got the idea after he couldn't find Crabb on a
map.
"My main idea was that incorporation was an advantageous move,
and the people here needed someone to lead the fight to keep cities from
annexing Crabb," Zimmerman said.
Zimmerman put money from his savings account into the fight to
get an incorporation referendum on the ballot, however, the final vote
went against incorporating.
"The mayor's office ended with that vote," he said.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday
through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the
University of Michigan. Subscription rates: January through April
- $15 in Ann Arbor, $22 outside the city. 1988 spring, summer,
and fall term rates not yet available.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the
National Student News Service.
Editor in Chief...................REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN Lauren Shapiro, Chuck Skarsaune, Tony Silber, Mark
Managing Editor....................MARTHA SEVETSON Swartz, Usha Tummala, Nabeel Zuberi.
News Editor.......................................EVE BECKER Photo Editors............KAREN HANDELMANs
University Editor ....................ANDREW MILLS JOHN MUNSON
NEWS STAFF: Victoria Bauer, Scott Chaplin Miguel PHOTO STAFF: Alexandra Brez, Jessica Greene, Jose
Cruz, Marion Davis, Paul De Rooij, Noah Finkel, Kelly Juarez, Robin Loznak, David Lubliner, Lisa Wax.
Gafford, Alex Gordon, Stacy Gray, Tara Gruzen, Donna Weekend Editor ............STEPHEN GREGORY
ladipaolo, Steve Knopper, Mark Kolar, Ed Krachmer, Scott Associate Weekend Editor.... .....BRIAN BONET
Lahde, Kristine LaLonde, Michael Lustig, Alyssa WEEKEND STAFF: John Shea.
t bLs PlcStaList Editor ................................AngeaMchael
Lustigroan, Fra.z Obied, Lisa Pollak, Micah Schnit, David LitEto. .........A elMcah
Schwartz, Jonathan Scott, Anna Senkevitch, Noelle Business
Shadwick, Nicole Shaw, Monica Smith, Nathan Smith, Manager. ..........................JEIN KI
Ryan Tutak, Mark Weisbrot, Lisa Wie.' Assistant Business Manager ............PAM BULLOCKI
Opinion Page Editors.............JEFFREY RUTHERFORD Display Sales Manager........... JACKIE MILLER
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OPINION STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed, Elizabeth Esch, Bill Special Sections Coordinator........LISA GEORGE
Gladstone, Kristin Hoffman, Rollie Hudson, Marc Klein, Classified Manager.. .......MEREDITH POLLACK
Karen Miller, I. Matthew Miller, Robecca Novick, Marcia Assistant Classified Manager ......DAVID EDINGER
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Sports Editor.....................................EFF RUSH Credit' Manager.................HYUN JOO 0]
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ADAM SCHEFfER DISPLAY SALES STAFF: Alyssa Altman, Paul Berkey
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