100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1988 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 17, 1988
Grease slicks

4

ack and soups up
IN Soph Show's not just another song and dance

BY BETH COLQUITT

I bet all of you have seen the
posters all around campus for
Grease. I bet you all thought of
Olivia Newton-John, John Travolta,
and Didi Conn with her pink hair.
Think again. The Soph Show pro-
duction of Grease is the original
1972 Broadway production, with all
the show songs left in, and the glitz
of the movie left out.
"The movie was campy and it
was kind of flashy," says Director
Jeff Lerner. The movie seemed as if
"they didn't trust the script they were
given. They kept having flashbacks
and scene changes. In the show the
whole thing takes place right there,
no cameras moving all over the
place."
Most of the musical Grease con-
sists - logically - of song and
dance, with only skits separating the
musical numbers. "They do the steps
of the '50s, the Sock Hop, the
Stroll, the steps our parents did,"
says Lerner.
The opening scene of Grease ,
omitted from the movie, is a high
school reunion. "It's kind of like
opening a yearbook, seeing who was
doing what when," says Lerner. "It
begins with a reunion, which sets up
the convention of why we are
watching this."
The movie also altered the
characterizations. Choreographer
Courtney Selan explains that in the

musical, "Sandy isn't from Aus-
tralia, she's from the same world
that they are, and at the same time
she isn't." Lerner adds, "All the
adults in the movie are represented
by one teacher - all the rest of the
characters are kids."
Assistant Music Director David
Kirshenbaum says that another ma-
jor difference between the two is that
there are at least four extra musical
numbers in the musical that were
left out, or played as background
music, in the movie, which also
contained about four new songs.
"Most of the songs in the movie
weren't even real '50s style - they
had a disco beat," she said.
The organization responsible for
this production is Soph Show, a di-
vision of the University Activities
Center which focuses on first- and
second-year students, who make up
the entire cast. Says Lerner, "For
many of them it's a new experience.
We need to build their confidence.
Many of them have never acted be-
fore."
"We have to show them that
they're capable of really doing
something, and of having a good
time," stressed Caroline Greenberg,
co-producer.
"We had a terrific turnout. 170
students tried out, and they were
mostly non-theatre majors," said
Greenberg.
Until A Chorus Line appeared on
Broadway, Grease was the longest

running show ever, and it still holds
third place. Says Selan, "All the
parents wanted to relive it, and all
the kids wanted to see it (for the first
time)."
The producers expect that this
production of Grease will be the
first since the death of co-author
Warren Casey last week. "It's done a
lot anyway, but it will be performed
even more now, as a result of hts
death," says Selan. Rumor had it
that Casey and Jim Jacobs, the two
authors of the show, were about to
write their first musical together
since Grease.
Casey and Jacobs, both greasers
themselves, wrote about what they
knew. "It's a very clever script,'
says Selan, "It's an upbeat show.
We want to satisfy the writer's orig-
inal visions. We hope that won't be
hard. It's not a difficult show, (it's
not deep), it's fun."
GREASE is presented by the Uri-
versity Activities Center at the Lydi
Mendelssohn Theatre on November
17,18, and 19 at 8 p.m. Tickets are
$S and are available at the Michigan'
Union Ticket Office and all TickeL-
Master locations.

4

Myth
Continued from Page 7

0

l

ROBN LOZNAK/iOy
Members of the Grease cast mouth off in a brusiers bonanza Tuesday on the Diag.

OLENTANGY INN
10 minutes from Ohio
State University Stadium
(within walking distance)
Rates: $33.95 for two
people with a double &
single bed ($5.00 per extra
person)
. Lounge
. 24 Hour Coffee Shop
Reservations: (614) 294-5211
1299 Olentangy River Rd.
(between 3rd and 5th Ave.)
Columbus, Ohio

IONA COLLEGE
University of Windsor
presents...
BUFFY
SAINTE-MARIE
academy-award-winning
singer & songwriter
'THE POLARIZATION
OF PEOPLE"
Mon. Nov. 28 7:30pm
Cleary Auditorium
201 Riverside Dr. East
Windsor, Ont.
Tickets $18. available at
Can-Am Centre and
Iona College
208 Sunset Ave.
Windsor, Ont.

4$ Self
Service
with coupon
kink .
the copy center
540 East Uberty
Open 24 Hours
1220 S. University
Open 24 Hours
Michigan Union
Open Eay - Open Late
CLASSIFIED ADS!
Call 764-0557

In The Spotlight
Shooting the Works
The Ann Arbor DanceWorks launches its fourth fall-season this
weekend with a program featuring several local premieres as well as
new works from several local artists.
Gay Delanghe will present the Ann Arbor debut of her satirical
dance for five, All of a Feather..., which treats the experience of the
artist as a financial and social outsider in the community.
Among the other works presented will be: two works from Linda
Spriggs Joy, a story of first love inspired by the Langston Hughes
poem of the same name; and Public Places/Private Spaces, a
unique collaboration combining dance and architecture.
The performance will be held tonight through Saturday night at
8 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. at the MacIntosh Theater of,
the School of Music. Tickets are $7, $5 for students and seniors.
Speaking in tongues
Ever watch an opera and puzzle over what language it's written
in? Well, now you have the chance to see one that's supposed to
be like that, as conductor/composer/pianist Donald Bryant
presents his operatic adaptation of The Tower of Babel.
Based loosely on the story from the book of Genesis, but with
several additions to the plot (including groups of tourists gawking
at the tower and a puppet show), the opera features over 100
performers and a 24-piece orchestra.
Performances are tonight and tomorrow night at 8 p.m. at the
First Presbyterian Church, located at 1432 Washtenaw Avenue.
Tickets are $8 for adults and $3 for children, and are available at the
church office.

a literary critic as well as a teacher of
Johnson's at Southern Illinois U-
versity, wrote of the novel, "The
storyteller's voice... is as magical
and human as the Faulkner voice; jP
some ways even better."
"I have to know the story befor% I
write it," Johnson says. "When I get
an idea, a voice, a story, and most
importantly a question I want to ex-
plain, then I can write. I write every
day until it's done."
Johnson's career - from his col-
lection of short stories, The Sor-
cerer' sApprentice, to his most rel
cent novel, Oxherding Tale --
shows a constant change and rest
lessness with new ideas and voices.
Johnson pursues this novelty in all
his work, and encourages'it in his
students as Washington University,
where he serves as head of the Cre-
ative Writing department.
"You have to try and do some
thing in your new story that you
haven't done before," Johnson in-
structs.
CHARLES JOHNSON will read
from his works at S p.m. in t
Rackham East Conference Room;
fourth floor. The selection will b
the first chapter from a novel-i -
progress, tentatively titled Ruther
ford's Travels.

wvr rsu
IF YOU
WANT TO BE A
pt PHYSICIAN,
WE'LL PAY FOR IT.
If you're willing to
invest your skills and
knowledge as an Air
Force medical officer,
we'll invest in you and
,fl pay your way through
medical school if you
qualify Its the Armed
Forces Health
Professions
Scholarship Program.
It pays for:
* Tuition;
* Books, supplies,
equipment and
lab fees;
*Plus a monthly
income ofmore
than $650.
" Call
uSAF HEALTH
+ " *PROFESSIONS
) 1 313-561-7018
COLLECT
YOWZAI R F

Michigan Daily
ARTS
763-0379

a

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

RECREATIONAL SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY SKI RENTAL MANAGERS NEEDED
SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS, WINTER TERM, 1989
AT
RADRICK FARMS GOLF COURSE
CROSS COUNTRY SKI RENTAL CENTER .

_,w
4
,1
Y

f~ Book, Music, and Lyrics by

EXPERIENCE WITH CROSS COUNTRY SKI EQUIPMENT HELPFUL 9
MUST HAVE OWN TRANSPORTATION
PAY STARTS AT $4.60 PER HOUR
CALL 763-4560 IF INTERESTED
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
GOING HOME FOR
THANKSGIVING?
DON'T DRIVE TO THE AIRPORT.

Jim Ja
A

Jcobs and Warren Casey

November 17,18,19 8:00pm
Mendelssohn Theatre
Tickets $5.00
for ticket info call 763-TKTS

I

I / %W-AR- UI

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan