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November 14, 1988 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-14

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 14, 1988 --Page7

UM News in
The Daily
764-0552
GOING PLACES
AIRLINE TICKET: Det. to Laguardia Nov.
24. Reas. price. Call Wendy 764-4783.
NEED A BREAK? Cabins w/ fire lace. Re-
sort located on lake, surrounded by forest.
Outdoor spa. X-skiing. Coz romantic, get-
away atmosphere. Nigtly I8-58. Traverse
City area. (616) 276-902.
ORIENT SUPERFARES
Bangkok fr. $859, Hong Kong fr. $759,
Seoul fr. $699 Taipai fr $719 Tokyo fr./
$781. REGENY TRAVEL, 269 S. State.
Call 665-6122 for details.
SPSING BREAK
Acapulco fr. $489. Bahamas fr. $419. Ja-
maica fr. $509. Puerto Vallarta fr. $549. Ask
about ACAPULCO Hotel El Cano SPE-
CIAL. REGENCY TRAVEL, 209 S. State.
Call 665-6122 for details.
SPRING BREAK Barefoot Bahamas Cruise
Sail 50 ft. Yachts in the Bahamas. Food in-
cluded $435/person. Call Don 769-1845.
SPRING BREAK HOTEL - AIR PACK-
AGES
AcapuIco from $489.00 Bahamas from
$419.00, Cancun from $5$9.00 Puerto Val-
larta from $579.00 -- FABEkTRAVEL,
Liberty at Maynard, 769-9011.

Conservative
Coalition
Candidates:7
Gene Kernatsky,Rackham
Heide Hayes, LSA
Rose Karadsheh,LSA
Nicolas Schmelzer, LSA
Glenn Kotcher, LSA
Matt Mansfield, LSA
Jason Channell, LSA
Anti-harassment policy:
Believes in the goal of the
policy but that it might deprive
student groups of the right to
free speech "The intention is
good but it's overkill."
Protest policy: In favor of
the policy because they think it

will protect speaker's rights
"(The) only type of speech
protected on this campus is
politically 'correct' speech."
"A presidential candidate can't
come to this campus because
of an immature minority (of stu-
dents)."
Deputization: Believes that
it will help deter crime and not
stifle free speech or protest
"(We) believe that popular and
responsible protest on cannot
be denied by campus
security."
Off-campus issues: Thinks
MSA spends too much time
and money on these issues
"No money is going off
campus if (we're) in control."

Independence
Candidates:2
Dan Tobocman, Engineering
Aaron Williams, Engineering
Anti-harassment policy:
Believes that the goals of such
a policy are needed but that
the current policy is vague
"In theory it's a good idea... but
the one they (the regents)
passed is so ambiguous... it
could crack down on free
speech."
Protest policy: In favor of
the policy because it protects
the rights of students to listen
to speakers.
"It's a pretty good policy...
(protesters) can't just say 'we
don't like these people' and
force them (off campus)."
Deputization: Believes its
purpose is to quell student
protest.
Off-campus issues: Thinks
that MSA focuses too much
on these issues, but shouldn't
be eliminate them completely.
Issues such as homelessness
should still be addressed
locally.

4

Heide Hayes

Dan Tobocman

Independent
Candidates
BY NOAH FINKEL
Like the national labels Re-,
publican and Democrat, party
names for this term's Michigan
Student Assembly elections ,
identify sometimes faceless
candidates with known posi-
tions.
But seven candidates in this1
year's MSA elections chose
not to run as members of any
party, and have tried to pro-1
mote their own views on the
issues.,

Michael McClelland, an in-
dependent candidate for
Business School representa-
tive, thinks MSA could become
more representative by con-
centrating less on off-campus
issues.
"I feel that MSA should fo-
cus on campus issues... MSA
wastes and abuses money,"
McClelland said.
Running against McClelland
for Business School
representative, independent
Ian Campbell also wants MSA
to downplay off-campus issues
in favor of issues that students
care about.

Zach Kittrie, current chair of
MSA's External Relations
Committee, is running inde-
pendently for LSA
representative. Kittrie says
MSA should focus on making
the assembly competent and
accessible, keeping down tu-
ition, and unifying the campus.
Other candidates include Ali
Jahan, running for the Medical
School seat, Michael Peterson
for Social Work, Anders Bor-
gen, Josephine Ballenger, and
Paul Feschuck for a Business
School seat, and Michael Ryan
for an LSA seat.

"We've heard people say they
want more attention paid to
issues like tuition hikes."
"We should address campus
issues first, anything else
second."
"You still have to give
something back to the
community but not the
Nicaraguan community or the
South African community."

TRAVEL FREE SPRING BREAK!
Fraternities & Sororities invited.
For inforiation about bein a Campus
Travel Rep. call 800-826-9100.
Ask for Steve or Janet.

7
-a.

YOUTH
FARES*STANDBYS*DISCOUNTS
$50 deposits on sring breaks. Contiki,
AESU I8-35 yrs., TopDek, CIEE tours.
Calor visit Student Travel Breaks
Downtown Ann Arbor Ker4ytown Sh
s407 N. Fifth Ave. 663-4400 or 483-5040.

U

a

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

RECREATIONAL SPORTS
IF YOU A RE GETTING BOGGED DOWN WITH
SCHOOL, WITH WORK, WITH WHAT EVER,
REMEMBER THA T AN EXERCISE BREAK MA Y
BE THE BEST THING FOR YOU.
VISIT ONE OF THE RECREA TIONAL SPORTS
4 FACILITIES TODAY!

WINTER BOOT SALE
* *
SAVE
15% to 50%
ON ALL
WO ME N'S
BOOT S
769-2088*
* SHOEllUT 7928
* Held Over
1208 S. University For Second Week!
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CAPITALIZE
On Graduate Opportunities
At The American University
Graduate programs in the College of Arts and Sciences offer you the
opportunity to develop both professional skills and intellectual capacities.
Many classes draw on the extensive resources of Washington, D.C., bringing
a valuable added dimension to graduate education.
Graduate Degree Programs in the College of Arts and Sciences

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