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November 11, 1988 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-11
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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U xw~ V V Wi

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Record Reviews Effe
en you wishupon a star...
Artists payy
tribute to 'the
magic of b
Disney

INTERVIEW
Corttinued from Page 11
put it, the incident concerns "an
auto worker, who was out of work,
beat up a Chinese guy who he
thought was Japanese." What are
your concerns about the implica-
tions of such a case, specifically as
an Asian American?
C: These are broader issues. Amer-
icans have very little understanding
of the Asian race. When you talk
about Asian Americans, they are all
lumped under one single name.
Asian Americans is a very, very
complex group of nationalities.
Almost as complex as the Hispan-
ics. We have Japanese, Chinese,
Korean, Filipino, Thai, Cambo-
dian, Vietnamese to name a few.
And each one of these particular
groups has a very, very different

cultural background. We got here
and we were told that we were
Asian Americans as a whole. And
in this particular film, it points out
there are differences between Chi-
nese and Japanese. I do not blame
the particular killer, Ron Ebens. I
blame moreso how our society
functions. .
W: What kind of changes do you
see are needed for the future?
C: I think the Vincent Chin case
has really taught us a lot of
lessons. Number one, that there is a
judicial system and you cannot
fight it in a one-way tract. You can
go by the legal system step by
step, but since the legal system was
never designed for you, if you fol-
low its routine, you're bound to
fail. That's my message to you.
Now the positive elements of the
Chin case, it brought a lot, a lot of

people together - white, Black,
Asian, and Hispanic - to reexam-
ine America's justice system, espe-
cially in the local level. We've be-
come aware that the country has
been increasing and increasing in
the number of cases like this and
that there is not enough funds, fed-
eral as well as state, to finance
proper investigations. So this kind
of racial tension I think is ulti-
mately caused by a lack of under-
standing within the entire judicial
system.
Lastly, I think through the case,
the people really understood and
learned that you can no longer stand
on the side observing. This
particular story, it did not happen in
the ghetto, it did not happen in the
projects; it happened among one of
the American middle groupings -
both the killer and the victim. So it

teaches us a lesson. That kind of a
miseducation, that kind of racism,
it does not only apply to the tradi-
tional roles of the Klu Klux Klan
anymore. It's no longer so
simplistic. That kind of mentality,
that kind of lack of education is be-
ing perpetuated throughout our in-
stitutional structure. The only way
to change it is through education.
There's no other way.
W:What films are you planning for
the future?
C: I'm making several films now,
One is about America's problems
and America's underclass, And, also
I'm working on a project that fo-
cuses on Chinese American culture,
dealing with the ancient form's
ability to survive in the electronic
world. Another piece I'd like to do
is basically about women. Women
who have children, a career, and not

al
bu
go
are
I c

T

Various

Artists

Stay Awake: various
interpretations of
songs from vintage
Disney Films
A & M Records
Hal Willner, who produced com-
pilations of Thelonius Monk and
Kurt Weill covers, has now
brought in a host of talents from
across the musical spectrum to
record some of the most popular
songs of the century. The power of
Stay Awake has much to do with
our collective memory. I, for one,
remember vividly the times my
parents treated me to a night at the
movies to catch the latest Disney
film. These were big events back
then. Of course, in my cynical old
age, I've reassessed much of the
Disney oeuvre, but on hearing
these tunes I got caught in the
sticky web of remembrance. Stay
Awake pulls so powerfully be-
cause of a desire for pleasure in all
of us; a desire for a truly sensual
pleasure stripped of all aggressive-
ness or what Eisenstein called a
"fetal happiness." In that case, this

Both the Replacements (left)
and Tom Waits (above) lent
their hands to this
monument to childhood.

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album is a welcome regression to
the womb for many of us.
The best performances here are
those wherein the songs undergo a
certain slippage, when its ambience
or message is transformed by a new
singer. On the other hand, some of
these songs are just plain odd,
whatever the singer may have done
to them. Unfortunately Natalie

Merchant and Michael Stipe's ren-
dition of "Little April Shower"
disappoints, and Los Lobos merely
shuffle, though competently,
through "I Wanna Be Like You;" it
would be hard to surpass the bril-
liant Louis Prima original from
The Jungle Book.
Where the album really begins to
glow is on Bonnie Raitt's version

of "Baby Mine" (from Dumbo).
Backed by Was (Not Was), Raitt
transforms a mother's song to her
child into an exquisite torch song
reminiscent of Rodgers' and Hart's
"My Funny Valentine." Tom
Waits' reading of "Heigh Ho" (The
Dwarfs Marching Song) is inspir-
ing! He brings in mining sound, ef-
fects and changes the whole tone of

the song. What was a jaunty num-
ber in the movie becomes a de-
pressing tale of little men alienated
from their labor. Waits, here the
ghost of Howlin' Wolf, groans
"We'll dig dig dig" repeatedly while
the band chugs away behind him.
It's as good as anything on his
Swordfishtrombones album.
See RECORDS, Page 7

N.-

ME"

I I Hill Street Players
JULES FEIFFER
HOLD ME!
Directed by Cci roln E. Caldwell
Performances At Performance Network,
408 W. Washington
November 10 , 8:00 pm, November 12, 8:00 & Midnight
November 13, 2:00 pm
Jules Feiffer, famous for his work as a cartoonist, has converted h s cartoons into short
scenes and monologues for Hold Me. The play is a fast-paced, funny and insightful look
MICHIGAN THEATER * NOVEMBER 19 ANN ARBOR 7:30 PM into contemporary life and interpersonal relationships. While the play is primarihy a
MICHGAN HEA ER "NOVE BER19 AN AROR 7:3 PMcomedy, Feiffer writes wit such compassion and understanding that Hold Me reaches
TICKETS AT Al - n.".OUTLETS INCLUDING AAA AND HUDSONS audiences on a deep, personal level..
AND AT THEDOOR .FORINFO CALL569-3500" TO CHARGE BY PHONE CALL 423-6666 Tickets are available at Hillel, and can be purchased at the door:
6Visa' Cad $6.00, $5.00 for students
SHind

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I

PAGE 4

W EEKEND/NOVEMBER 11, 1988

WEEKEND/NOVEMBER 11, 1988

I -

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