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November 11, 1988 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-11

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 11, 1988 - Page 3

LaGROC

organizes

defense

BY LISA WINER
Frustrated because they think the
police are not concerned for their
safety, members of the gay male and
lesbian community took measures
last Friday night to protect them-
selves against attackers.
The Lesbian and Gay Rights Or-
ganizing Committee implemented a
"Community Defense Watch" for at-
tenders of Friday "gay nights" at the
Nectarine Ballroom on Liberty
Street.
A statement from LaGROC ex-
plained: "The CDW will provide
protection and an escort to people
German
official
praises
Na zi era
BONN, West Germany (AP) -
The president of the West German
parliament called the early years of
the Hitler era a "glorious" time for
many Germans, triggering a walkout
during the government's solemn
ceremony yesterday marking the
Kristallnacht.
The statement by Philipp
Jenninger threatened to overshadow
West Germany's carefully planned
ceremonies marking the 50th
anniversary of the Kristallnacht, the
night the Nazis began their first
organized push against the Jews.
"Didn't Hitler bring to reality what
(Kaiser) Wilhelm II had only
promised, that is to lead the Germans
to glorious times? Wasn't he chosen
by Providence, a Fuhrer as such is
.given to a people only once in a
thousand years?" Jenninger asked
rhetorically.
The remarks by Jenninger led to
-demands for his resignation by.
members of the opposition Greens
sand Social Democrats, who were
among 50 who marched out of the
hall during the nationally televised
speech to parliament.
Starting with the Kristallnacht of
Nov. 9-10, 1938, the Nazis made
,clear their intentions to wipe out
:European Jews. On that night, Nazi
thugs destroyed Jewish homes,
'businesses and synagogues, sending
:30,000 Jews to concentration camps
and killing 91 Jews.

concerned for their safety, a visible
presence which will deter attacks
from happening in the first place, and
rescue victims of assaults. There will
also be a group of people outside the
Nectarine to witness and photograph
any violence which does occur. It is
hoped that photographic evidence and
witnesses will be enough to force the
police to arrest gay-bashers."
Last week, when the Nectarine
held its first Friday gay night, mem-
bers of LaGROC feared people not
expecting that "night" might become
violent.
Although "most people weren't

-, ,.-

Gay men and lesbians don't
feel protected by police

dealing well with the fact that it was
gay night," no violence occurred, said
Linda Kurtz, a LaGROC spokesper-
son.
LaGROC created the watch in re-
sponse to alleged police mishandling
of assaults on gay men and lesbians
last summer.
"The fact is, the police are, in

general, only interested in stopping
assaults against white, presumably
heterosexual men and women. In at
least three instances in which les-
bians and gay men have been ver-
bally or physically attacked, the po-
lice have refused to go in pursuit of
their attackers," Kurtz said.
Police Chief William Corbett

could not be reached for cor
Deputy Chief of Police'
Lunsford has said LaGROC ha
and valid concerns," noting
may not have acted in a mar
"caring and empathetic" a
should have last summer. F
officers accused of not purse
tackers have denied LaGROC
gations.
Lunsford said the police
ment encourages community
prevention, and denied the
have no interest in endinga
perpetrated against minorities.
No one took advantage of

watch
mment. vice last week, but LaGROC plans
Walter to continue the Friday night pro-
as "true gram.
police "Police are saying once the
nner as weather cools down the attacks will
s they stop," Kurtz said. "(But) they've
But the been happening frequently enough;
sing at- they'll happen again."
's alle- Members of LaGROC and others
formed an Anti-Violence and Dis-
depart- crimination Task Force last summer
y crime to address their concerns about anti-
police gay violence. In September, the task
assaults force voiced their concerns in a
meeting with Corbett, who agreed
the ser- then to try to relieve them.

MSA to begin its
elections Nov. 15

BY KRISTINE LALONDE
Campaign stops, handshakes, and
showy speeches are finally over,
right? Not so fast - campus student
government elections are just around
the bend, and prospective campus
leaders are busy getting out the vote.
All students can vote for their
school or college representatives to
the Michigan Student Assembly next
Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 15 and
16.
Also on the ballot will be a pro-
posal to pay MSA's executive offi-
cers. The proposal, if passed, will
eliminate an assembly rule disallow-
ing salaries to elected members, but
will not determine the amount paid.
MSA has an operating budget of
nearly $150,000 this year. The bud-
get comes from fees assessed to stu-
dent tuition.
Issues facing the candidates in-
clude deputization of campus secu-
rity, student involvement in

administration decision making, and
the University's anti-harassment and
protest policies.
Although 2,500 students voted in
last spring's election, the fall elec-
tion traditionally has a lower turnout.
"All those people who complain
about MSA should get out and vote,"
said MSA Rep. Brian Haus, a Rack-
ham graduate student.
Candidates from the smaller
schools - the School of Medicine,
the School of Public Health, the
School of Music, and the School of
Social Work - are running unop-
posed for single assembly positions.
In dentistry, education, and library
science, no candidates are running,
and write-in candidates could win
with only one vote.
Six parties - Centerpoint, the
Conservative Coalition, Indepen-
dence, the Moderates, Practical Party,
and Student Rights - and 11 inde-
pendents are vying for positions.

Strung out ROBIN LOZNAK/Daily
Ann Arbor resident Geoff Blow restrings a tennis racket at Moe's Sport Shop on State
St. Blow is the only officially licensed stringer in Ann Arbor.

1

Jews-
Continued from Page 1
The trigger event, Loewenberg
said, was the killing of a Polish
Jewish youngster, who had been de-
prived of German nationality and
forced to live on the borders of
Germany and Poland.
His sister had written to a French
diplomat who, enraged by the news,
had gone to the German embassy,
and killed the first German diplomat
he saw. When word of the retalia-
tion got to Munich, Hitler asked for

spontaneous demonstrations against
Jews and commanded the police not
to interfere unless the life or prop-
erty of some German gentile was at
stake.
Every Jewish center synagogue
and business was burnt down; about
100 Jews were killed and 1,200 left
homeless. This, according to
Loewenberg, marked the beginning
of Kristallnacht (Crystal Night),
named.after the shattered glass on
the streets of Germany and Austria.
"Kristallnacht was the first

'pogrom' centralized from Berlin and
carried on a national basis,"
Loewenberg said. "The most
important feature of this pogrom is
the systematic humiliation of the
Jews all over Germany and Austria."
In a three hour, forty minute
meeting, Hitler held to discuss how
to humiliate the Jews more com-
pletely, a cabinet member reportedly
said, "Let's make them pay a billion
deustchmarks for their atonement.
The pigs would not commit one
more murder." This became law.

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