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November 02, 1988 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Clinic
to run
film,
lecture
BY JESSICA STRICK
The University's Psychological
Clinic will sponsor a showing of
David Lynch's controversial film
"Blue Velvet," in what may be the
first in a series of film-lecture pro-
grams.
Rackham graduate student Jennifer
Stuart, a psychology intern at the
clinic, said the program is designed
to show a "current and psychologi-
cally provocative film." The lecture
following the film should encourage
intellectual thought with applied
psychological theory, she said.
"What David Lynch does as a di-
rector, in a complicated way, shows
us 'the unconscious fantasies of the
protagonist and shows them as if
they're reality," said Psychoanalyst
Ronald Benson. He will lead the dis-
cussion with English Prof. Ira
Konigsberg, Director of the Program
in Film and Video Studies.
The film centers around the
familiar "coming of age" theme, said
Benson, adding that David Lynch's
treatment of the transition from ado-
lescence to adulthood "speaks directly
to tis" and causes a stronger, often
confusing, reaction.
"Blue Velvet" is strung together
with real events and dream-like fan-
tasies without a logical chronology,
which forces the viewer to react to
both.
Benson said the film's blatant
sexuality, sado-masochistic violence,
and potent symbolism disturb many
viewers. "It bypasses the usual with-
out a true intellectual understanding
of what we've seen. It is a highly
emotional experience."
The Psychological Clinic will
sponsor this event for entertainment
and exposure, as well as to raise
money to support training and re-
search projects at the clinic. Stuart
said attendance at the film this
Saturday, to be held at 7 p.m. in
MLB Auditorium 3, will determine
whether the clinic will sponsor future
presentations.
The University provides the clinic
with only one-fourth of its funds.
Founded in 1938 by a grant from
Mary Rackham, the clinic serves lo-
cal residents and University students
while training its staff of graduate
students, Clinical Psychology stu-
dents, and School of Social Work
students.
GEO
Continued from Page I
to find other, internal solutions,"
Holbrook said.
Holbrook said the outside tax at-
torney, who has not yet been hired,
will answer that question and, if
needed, suggest such solutions. A
decision will be made by mid-
November, he said.
And it can't take much longer: the

University, expecting Congress to re-
enact the exemptions, has been pay-
ing the 1988 taxes itself and billing
the students - without imposing
penalties on those who didn't pay.
But if the new tax law doesn't offer
exemptions, GSAs will have to pay
those bills next year.
THE UNIVERSITY has con-
sulted external tax counsel for advice
on the tuition tax waiver issue be-
fore. Their previous attorney, David
Donaldson of Boston, maintained the
tuition waiver will be taxable as long
as it remains in the GEO contract.
"We are certainly behind the Uni-
versity in their attempt to get another
opinion; we obviously didn't like
Donaldson's conclusions," said GEO
President Don Demetriades. GEO has
said it will not agree to remove the
waiver from the contract when it be-
gins new negotiations with the Uni-
versity this spring; the students don't
want to leave the waiver "up to the
University's discretion."
"Donaldson was working under
the old law. We want someone new
for this new situation," Holbrook
said, but would not say whether
Donaldson's interpretations affected
the University's decision not to re-
tain him.
Two members of Congress,
speaking about the tax bill last week,

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 2, 1988 - Page 5
Center gets
grant to fight
blindness

BY NOELLE SHADWICK
The Kellogg Eye Center received a
$276,000 grant this fall to study
causes and cures of Retinitis
Pigmentosa - a hereditary disease
that causes blindness in one out of
every 4,000 people.
The grant was given to the Kel-
logg Eye Center by the National Re-
tinitis Pigmentosa Foundation.
RP affects vision by destroying
the eye's photoreceptors, said Dr.
Paul Sieving, assistant professor of
Ophtalmology. Photoreceptors usu-
ally catch light and send messages of
what has been received to the brain.
But people with RP lose all of their
photoreceptors.
The disease is first detected during
the teenage years when victims begin
having trouble seeing at night. Later
on, peripheral vision disappears,
causing objects to appear as it they
were located at the end of a tunnel.
The patient is usually blind by the
age of 50, Sieving said.

The Kellogg Center team, two re-
searchers and two consultants, will
try using linkage'analysis to locate
the gene that causes Retinitis Pig-
mentosa. In this method researchers
try to associate certain chromosome
markers or probes which occur on
certain areas of the chromosome with
the disease.
Because RP is passed from one
generation to the other through the x
chromosome - females have two x
chromosomes; males, one - the re-
searchers can pinpoint certain areas
on the chromosome which could
carry the gene.
By charting the course of the dis-
ease through large families and by
studying blood samples of those
family members, researchers can de
termine if one type of molecular
probe or marker occurs on the t
chromosome more often than others.
"This gets you close to the region
where the gene is positioned," Siev-
ing said.

, WE
ROBIN LOZNAK/Doily
Members of the Delta Delta Delta society teeter-tot on the Diag yesterday in an effort to
raise money for Mott Children's Hospital.
Greeks teeter-toter for tots

BY MARK MENDELIS
Despite bone-chilling rains,
Ann Arbor's infamous winds, and
mid-term-minded students, two
campus greek houses are pooling
their resources to put on the sev-
enth annual Diag Teeter-Totter-A-
Thon.
Delta Delta Delta women and
Chi Psi men will be teeter-totter-
ing on over 10 feet of see-saw for
48 hours, while other house
members collect donations for
children at Mott Children's
Hospital.
The Teeter-Totter-A-Thon be-
gan yesterday at noon and will run
until noon tomorrow.
Last year the benefit raised
roughly $2,600 for the children at

Mott, many of whom suffer from
cancer, bone marrow diseases, and
other rare childhood disorders.
This year, the two greek
organizations hope to raise
$3,000, said Laura Irwin of Delta
Delta Delta.
"I'm very flattered that they (the
sponsors and the student body)
would think of us and the children
that we are treating," said Dr.
Lawrence Boxer, professor and
director of pediatric hematology at
Mott.
The bulk of the proceeds will
be applied to ongoing research
projects at the pediatric center,
Boxer said. He added that the cen-
ter was recently awarded a "big-

league bucks" grant from the Na-
tional Institutes of Health for its
groundbreaking research in pedi-
atrics. The grant will provide
funding for a cancer center to be
built on the Medical Center
grounds.
Most greeks at the benefit said
the cause was wholly worthwhile
and even fun at times.
Though -the late-night or
"graveyard" shifts can be chal-
lenging to early morning teeterers,
there are clearly some benefits.
"Because there is less of a rush,j
people give more money at
night," noted Lynn Hudes, an art
school junior and member of
Delta Delta Delta.

I

Forum
Continued from Page 1
versity Affirmative Action Director,
said the University should be more
accessible to prospective students.
Recent tuition increases, she said,
are making the University a more
exclusive institution - which is a
"very serious problem... If the gov-
ernment does not provide the dollars
for the University of Michigan, we
have to get those dollars from some-
place," she said.
LEWAND, a Birmingham at-
torney who did not attend the

University, agreed, saying that his.
"fresh approach" to the board cai-
help garner more University funds
from the state.
Lewand was the only major-party,
candidate to support adding sexual
orientation to the University's non-
discrimination bylaw.
The Libertarian candidates spent
their time explaining their political
philosophies and relating them to
University issues. Salvette said the
University should try to cut its fi-
nancial ties with the state and be-
come a private college. That way, h6"
said, the state will have no control
over the University.

Musket
previews
new show
BY LAURA SAGOLLA
Yesterday from the damp and
windy Diag, there rose strange strains
of hosannas and amens. The group
was not liturgical, but theatrical. Not
religious, but a little boisterous. It
was a preview - or a celebration -
of Musket's "Jesus Christ Super-
star," which opens Thursday at 8
p.m. in the Power Center.
On the steps of the graduate li-
brary, the cast of "Superstar" offered
an energetic round of three songs
from the show, including the title
tune. The sound system was poor,
but not poor enough to drown out
their insistent voices.
The production's biggest innova-
tion, according to director Eric Gib-
son, a junior in the music school, is
its unusual casting. Pontius Pilot
and Herod, traditionally male roles,
will be played by women to offset
the show's gender lopsidedness.
"It will be tasteful but fun,"
Gibson said. "It won't be a deep, de-
pressing story. That's the last thing
we wanted."

Stop studyin' and start laughin'!
Stand Up Comedy
PRESENTS THE HLARIOUS COMEDY OF
LOWELL SANDERS
With Student Comedans
Tom Franck Jon Glaser
and
Dana Nessel
WEDNESDAY
NOVEMBER 2
10 P.M.

LSA NEEDS YOU .. .
FOR STUDENT GOVERNMENT
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE
FOR THE 88-89 TERM -
PICK ONE UP IN THE LSA OFFICE
4003 MICHIGAN UNION
APPLICATION FILING DEADLINE IS
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4TH
GE T INVOLVED!!
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL THE LSA OFFICE
763-4799

f-" 4
y4, F
> :ff

IN THE U-CLUB

$2.50

W~etp. 4cira I R
1*U kmf
Y-r 00"1.O.m "

Sunday, . da' gO

THE
~a$Th~c.,UN1VEiRSITY
The University Club is a private club for
students, faculty, staff, alumni, and their
accompanied guests. Only members may purchase alcohol.

[i

CAREERS
BEGIN'
WITH...
Representatives of Lafarge Corporation will be
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4

Lafarge
Corporation.
The Lafarge Corporation is a Fortune 300
Company, with annual sales of over
$1 Billion, based in Reston, Virginia. Through
its affiliation with French based Lafarge Coppee,
we offer an excellent opportunity to travel
and advance in an International Organization.
The Lafarge Corporation of today operates

i

on Campus

to interview candidates for entry-level Engineers
in the fields of:

" MECHANICAL
" ELECTRIC
" V TJTT.

- CERAMIC
" MINING
ClU"Tay n v

I

I

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