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October 21, 1988 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-21

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 21, 1988 - Page 5

Writer talks on
Chinese press

750,000
kids tal

U.S.
ro0

I.

BY STEVEN FELDMAN
Chinese journalist Liu Binyan
criticized the lack of freedom of the
press in China and attacked the
widespread corruption in the Chinese
government before a standing-room-
only crowd last night in the Rack-
ham amphitheatre.
Liu told the audience of about 200
Qf the flourishing class of corrupt
bureaucrats who are draining China's
economic, political, and spiritual
strength.
Liu's speech, given in Chinese
lind translated at intervals into En-
glish, was the eighth annual Alexan-
der Eckstein Memorial Lecture,
named after a former director of The
Center for Chinese Studies.
A columnist for the People's
Daily and vice chair of the Chinese
Writers' Association Liu is "one of
China's best known social critics,"
said Kenneth Lieberthal, director of
the University's Center for Chinese
Studies.
ItLiugave several examples of the
corruption he said permeates the vast

majority of the Chinese Communist
Party. In one village, disaster funds
were diverted by local officials to
purchase cars for themselves, he said.
"The fires of corruption are burn-
ing brighter than ever," Liu said.
"Most bureaucrats enjoy privileges
that accord them immunity from
prosecution. Also, as they rise in of-
ficial rank and position, their
responsibility declines. Courts won't
inquire into their illegal activities.
Who could avoid becoming corrupt
but an angel or a saint?"
All Chinese are feeling the effects
of such corruption and incompetence,
Liu said. Inflation has reached double
digits in 1988, meaning that most
Chinese are spending close to 100
percent of their budget on food.
Liu expressed his frustration with
the Chinese press repeatedly being
attacked and prosecuted for reporting
such corruption while the crooked
officials are beyond the reach of the
law.
"The newspapers must be freed up
to report the urgent problems," Liu
said.

C

stimulants

CHICAGO - At least 750,000
U.S. children are taking stimulant
medications to curb their overactivity
or inattentiveness, but it is not
known how many are getting the
drugs appropriately, according to re-
searchers cited in today's Journal of
the Americal Medical Association.
A furor has arisen over the fact
that drugs such as Ritalin, Dexedrine
and Cylert, once prescribed mainly to
stem hyperactivity, are now also giv-
en to non-hyperactive children who
have trouble paying attention, the re-
searchers said.

At least 13 lawsuits in four states
and the District of Columbia have
been filed by parents upset at the ef-
fect of Ritalin on their children.
Researchers said both uses are ap-
propriate if a youngster suffers from
the strict psychiatric definition of
"hyperactivity" or "attention deficit,"
or a combination of the two.
But Dr. Daniel Safer, the study's
lead author, said more research is nec-
essary to determine how many
youngsters nationally actually need
to - or should - be taking the
drugs.

THE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CENTER
STUDY IN
OXFORD, ENGLAND

JESSICA GREENE Doily
Chinese journalist Liu Binyan attacks government corruption
and restrictions on newspapers in China.

. DSS seeks sign language course

BY LISA PERCZAK
There's one language you can't
practice with tapes in the language
lab, and you don't have to learn how
to read and write it. But that doesn't
mean American Sign Language is
easy, said Darlys Vander Beek, direc-
tor of Disabled Student Services.
And if she has her way, sign lan-
guage could soon become an accred-
ited University course. "In the past if
you signed, it was considered...
dirty," Vander Beek said. "People
were punished for using sign; now
people are clamoring to use it."
Those who want to learn can take
a' non-accredited course through the
Union, and they can practice with
"Signs of the Times," a sign lan-

guage club of about 30 students and
community members, every Sunday
afternoon. But giving credit for the
course will lend credence to deaf edu-
cation, she said, and encourage more
students to learn the language.
In the past, when groups on other
campuses have attempted to establish
ASL as a foreign language, oppo-
nents have said sign language lacks
the culture associated with other lan-
guages, and that it's too easy to learn
to warrant credit.
Vander Beek disagrees. "The deaf
have their own culture; it is an entity
unto itself," she said. "Persons who
are deaf will associate with other deaf
individuals and through their com-

mon language, develop culture."
And though it's very easy to learn
words in sign language, learning to
arrange words in the appropriate sign
order is extremely difficult, she said.
Many schools across the nation
already offer sign language as a for-
eign language, including the Univer-
sity of Minnesota and University of
California at Northridge, Vander Beck
said. She's optimistic that the Uni-
versity will do the same.
The proposal for the course is not
yet written, but Vander Beek will
discuss it with an academic panel
next month.
In the meantime, Vander Beek
said, "Signs of the Times" is a good

forum for improving signing skills.
Although the club suggests that
new members have a working
knowledge of American Sign Lan-
guage, it is one of the ways Ann Ar-
bor hearing-impaired people can re-
ceive help with basic signing skills.
ALL-CAMPUS
NON-ALCOHOLIC
HAPPY HOUR!
Friday, October 21,
4:00-6:30 pm
Sigma Chi Fraternity
548 S. State
FREE PIZZA
AND SODA
All U of M Students,
Faculty and Staff
Welcome!
-sponsored by the U of M
Panhellenic Association

Academic Program
Several colleges of Oxford University have invited The Washington International Studies Center
(WISC) to recommend qualified students to study for one year or for one or two terms. Lower
Junior status is required, and graduate study is available. Students are directly enrolled in their
colleges and receive transcripts from their Oxford college; This is NOT a program conducted by a
U.S. college in Oxford. Oxford colleges are-accredited by the U.S. Dept. of Education to
accept students with Guaranteed Student Loans. Multi-national student housing and social
activities are offered, and cultural tours are conducted by WISC. A special summer session is
directed by WIJSC.
INTERN IN
WASHINGTON, D.C.

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Pre-professional Program
The Washington International Studies Center offers summer internships with Congress, with the
White House, with the media and with think tanks. Government and Journalism courses are taughl
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college students with a 3.0 GPA or above are eligible.
For further information, please write or call:

The Panhellenic/iFC ad in the
Oct. 18 Michigan Daily con-
tained an error.
In recognition of alcohol aware-
ness week, Oct. 16-22, Rick's
Cafe should have been included
as a business providing free or 1/2
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We regret any inconveniences
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The Universityof Michigan
ficeor
FAfciad

ATTENTION
PART - TIME STUDENTS
There may be a grant for you!

Michigan residents who have been out of high school more than two years
and demonstrate financial need may be eligible for the MICHIGAN ADULT
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Contact the Office of Financial Aid for details and application.

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Mon.-Fri. 8:15-11:45 and 1:00-4:00
Thurs. 10:00-11:45 and 1:00-4:00

APPLICATION DEADLINE
NOVEMBER 15, 1988

QUESTIONS?
Call Us!
763-6600

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TO HELP RAISE MONEY
FOR THE UNIVERSITY
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Gain valuable business experience while selling advertising to local and
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