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October 21, 1988 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-21

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Nobody
makes
a stop
on Diag
BY STEVEN FELDMAN
What do Mike Dukakis, Jesse
Jackson, Paul Simon, Rich Gep-
hardt, Pat Robertson, and now No-
I body have in common? They all
made campaign stops here while
running for president.
The "Nobody for President" cam-
paign caravan rolled into Ann Arbor
yesterday, with campaign chair Wavy
Gravy touting Nobody before a large
noon-time crowd on the Diag.
All students should vote for No-
body, Wavy Gravy said, because
"Nobody should have that much
power."
"Nobody should run our lives."
"Nobody will lower our taxes."
"And Nobody makes apple pie
better than Mom's."
Also, Wavy Gravy said, "Nobody
plays kick-ass rock 'n' roll like we
do."
The rock 'n' roll was supplied by
the Vicious Hippies, from Berkeley,
California, who are touring with
Wavy Gravy. And Nobody.
Wavy Gravy, who describes him-
self as a "psychedelic relic," was the
emcee at the Woodstock festival in
1969.
Nobody later made an appearance,
but Nobody had nothing to say. Ac-
tually, Nobody was a wind-up set of
teeth perched on a pillow held by
Wavy Gravy. The crowd responded
with cheers when Nobody chattered
and clicked.
Patrolling the crowd was a dark-
suited man in mirrored shades that
Wavy Gravy said was a Secret Ser-
vice agent borrowed from the Ford
presidency. Wavy Gravy said they
needed the Secret Service because
"Nobody isn't completely safe."
G ro up
barks at
Arb tree=

The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 21, 1988 - Page 3
Ann Arbor

ranks

low

on stress

BY TARA GRUZEN
Midterms are nothing.
You could live in a city where six
people crowd into-every room of ev-
ery house. You could pass numerous
hazardous waste sights on your way
to class each day.
The sound of gunshots under your
window could keep you up at night.
But they don't. Ann Arbor was
tied with Lincoln, Nebraska as the
third least stressful city, out of 190
studied by the Washington-based or-
ganization Zero Population Growth.
The study was based on how well
a city dealt with such factors as pop-
ulation change, education, air quality,
water, and violence.
Of the cities rated least stressful,
two of the top three - Ann Arbor
and Madison, Wisconsin - are uni-
versity towns.
Although students may be indi-
vidually stressed from their studies or
other personal problems, they don't

have to worry much about their
community's problems.
As Social Work Prof. Siri Ja-
yaratne said, "Ann Arbor is a pretty
good place to live because it is a lot
more responsive than many other
cities."
Karl Gawell, director of govern-
ment relations for Zero Population
Growth explained, "Universities tend
to score well because a university
brings a lot to a city. A town's sen-
sitivity is often very high when it is
dealing with a university."
The scores were based on govern-
ment statistics and the cities' own
rating of how it deals with problems.
Each city scored themselves on a ba-
sis from 1 to 5, with 5 being the
most stressful.
Ann Arbor's rating was 1.8. The
nation's least stressful city, Cedar
Rapids, Iowa scored a 1.6. The most
stressful city was Gary, Indiana, rated
with a 4.2.

Wsm

AdP - - - ' -- --

I

What a fee-eling
Catlin Cobb, a New York dancer, performs as part of the Dance Department's
Series last night in Dance Studio A. The series focuses on young experimental
of whom are from New York City. Silhouetted are (from left 'to right) Tonya
Cohen, and Joann Constantinides, all Dance students.

Guest Artist
artists, most
Beard, Lesli

Alcohol abets excessive Tackett ends strike

behavio'
BY MICAH SCHMIT
If you've ever been drunk, you
know what alcohol does. It can make
you share secrets you didn't plan to
tell, eat food you weren't really hun-
gry for, pick fights with friends, or
even make sexual advances you may'
regret.
But the problem isn't actually
what you do because of alcohol; it's
what your conscience fails to do
while you're under the influence. The
normal policing system that keeps
you from acting out extreme inten-
tions is disabled, causing "alcohol
myopia."
"If you were mad at someone, say
your landlord, and you run into him
at a cocktail party, you are much
more inclined to act on that impulse
and embarrass yourself," said

- . Ak 'MW - - --.- - - -- -- -rr - - - - V

U' prof. says

after eight days

searcher at the University's Institute
for Social Research, identified two
kinds of drunkenness: "drunken ex-
cess" and the combination of alcohol
with psychological stress.
Steele analyzed 21 studies involv-
ing over 2000 subjects, and found
that the average intoxicated subject
tended to commit 70 percent more
"socially excessive acts" than sober
subjects.
Drunken excess, he said, makes
individuals act in extreme ways and
"explains why people do things when
they are drunk that they might not
otherwise do when sober, such as
running down the street naked."
And though few students would
think of doing that when sober, it's
not so unusual once alcohol has re-
moved your inhibitions.
LSA senior Rob Figa said one
night he spent partying with friends
in Philadelphia fit that bill. Around
midnight, he and his friends scouted
the area for police and decided to take
their chances.
"We took our clothes off and ran
up the steps to the Museum of Art,
humming the Rocky theme song and
waving our fists like Rocky did.
When we got to the top there was a

limo with prom people around it...
they just kind of laughed."
Coupling alcohol with
psychological stress, however,
doesn't cause such reckless behavior.
The combination can have two ef-
fects, Steele said.
An isolated drinker will feel an
increase in stress, and may become
even more depressed, he said. An in-
dividual under stress who is drinking
but is also distracted - at a party or
football game, for example - would
feel temporarily relieved.
The myopia, in either case, allows
the drinker to focus only on "what is
right under his nose," Steele said.
But the stress returns when the alco-
hol or distractions are gone. The need
for temporary relief can drive people
to depend on alcohol, he noted.

BY ALEX GORDON
Charles Tackett, head of the Na-
tional Vietnam Memorial Holiday
Project, ended his eight-day hunger
strike against the Detroit Free Press
and The Detroit News Wednesday af-
ter meeting with Free Press Reader
Representative Joe Grimm.
"I tried to help him figure his way
through the maze here, and now I
hope he knows he can talk to the
Free Press," Grimm said. The strike
protested what Tackett called "greed
and inhuman treatment," stemming
from several incidents this summer
in which Tackett said he was treated
rudely by Free Press and News em-
ployees.
Tackett was unavailable for com-
ment yesterday.
In a letter sent the day the strike
began, Tackett outlined his com-

plaints and demanded he receive a
letter of apology. Grimm said he is-
sued a formal apology to Tackett in a
letter thanking him "for reminding us
(the Free Press) of the great trust the
public has in us and our responsibil-
ity to those people."
"I don't think a hunger strike was
necessary, but for his personal rea-
sons he felt-he had to," Grimm said.
"But I'm sure glad it's over, and I'm
sure he is too."

r1

WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

n p i University
Steele.
Convers
BY SCOTT CHAPLIN weren't mad
Tree-nappers beware. The Univer- were still dr
sity's School of Natural Resources is danger of ca
offering rewards of up to $500 for "Alcohol
help in catching thieves and vandals tile, rather it
who steal or damage plants in the the thinking
University's Nichols Arboretum, hibit you,"
Pine poachers from a campus fra- In a rec
ternity cut down a 40-foot Northern
White Cedar to use as a Christmas
tree in December of 1986, but they
were caught when they left a trail of
pine needles. Last holiday season the C
Arb's only remaining Korean pine (F
was stolen. That time, the thieves
got away.
Most of the damage, though, oc-
curs accidentally when sledders crush I
young saplings, said Theresa Callery,
a graduate student in the School of SUNDAY
Natural Resources and founder of the W E D NE S
group, Friends of the Nichols Ar- COLLEGE
boretum. C HR
Citing continued problems of tree
theft and fauna flattening, Callery You C
decided to form the group to educate and t h
the public about the Arb's philoso-
phy. TRANSP
"The Arb is not a city park, but
mpre of a nature reserve," Callery
said. The Friends' primary goal is to
instill a sense of public responsibil-
ity for the 123 acres of rolling hills
and meadows located on the Huron
River, just east of Mary Markley
residence hall.
The Arb has a unique ecosystem,
Callery said. There are over 150 gen-
era of trees represented in the Arb,)
with some species not found else-
where in Michigan.
You can never add into the cost
of a specimen the aesthetic value, nor
tithe personal attachment Arb-goersI
form for these trees," Callery said.
Callery hopes that the reward
policy, similar to a neighborhood Ji
crime watch, will only be a tempo- SP
rary measure until people begin
valuing the Arb as a "haven for rare
plants, research, and as a nature re-
treat."
Informants, who may remain
anonymous, can call University Se-

Psychology Prof. Claude
ely, Steele said, if you
d at your landlord, yet you
unk, you would not be in
using a scene.
[ does not make you hos-
t prevents one from doing
that would normally in-
Steele said.
ent study, Steele, a re-

__, . _.

STRATEGIC
PLANNING
ASSOCIATES. INC.

-_

ANN ARBOR'S

-LURCH OF CHRIST
ollowers of Jesus Christ using the Bible
as our only guide and authority.)
nvites YOU to Worship with Us

WASHINGTON - NEW YORK - LONDON - PARIS

" GENEVA " SINGAPORE

(...9:30 AM, 6:00 PM 53
SDAY...7:30 PM
E CLASSES ON...
ISTIAN EVIDENCES
AN prove that God exists,
at Jesus Christ is His Son!
PORTA TION INFO 662-9928

30 W. Stadium Blvd.
Phone 662-2756
N 0
e Stadium
W. Stadium
coif
Pioneer Course
Hig Scool

If'

O'I D4dij RESTAURANT
"24 YEARS EXPERIENCE"

I

Cordially invites you to a presentation on
Opportunities in
Management. Consulting
Please join Ron Cooper, Vice President, and other members of
SPA's professional staff at the University of Michigan:
Monday, October 24, 1988
Michigan Union, Kuenzle Room
7:30 p.m.
We will also hold an informational session at the.
School of Business Administration, Paton 1016, at 4:30 p.m.

CHEF JAN-
TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER
UDG ES SPECIAL AWARD
ONSORED BY MICHIGAN RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION
MICHIGAN CHEFS DE CUISINE ASSOCIATION-
BEST CHEF AWARD WINNER
IN WASHINGTON D.C.

Interested 1989 graduates
sign up in Career Planning & Placement or
submit resumes and transcripts to:
Karen Sachs, Recruiting Coordinator,

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