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October 18, 1988 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-18

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The Michigan Daily -Tuesday, October 18, 1988 - Page 5

Pro-choicers air TV

ad

LANSING (AP) - Opponents of
Proposal A - which would ban
state-funded abortions - took to the
airwaves yesterday with a $750,000
advertising campaign to warn Michi-
gan voters that the proposal could
mean higher taxes.
A television ad unveiled by the
People's Campaign for Choice says
banning Medicaid abortions for poor
women could increase welfare costs
as much as $45 million a year.
The ad says the costs of a birth
will be 10 times the cost of an abor-
tion, and that the costs of Aid to De-
pendent Children benefits will be 10
times greater than that.

Judith Frey, state spokesperson
for the People's Campaign for
Choice, said the ad is designed to
counter television commercials run
by those who want to ban tax-funded
abortions, which she said imply that
the state will save money by not
paying for the service.
Barbara Listing, president of
Michigan Right to Life, has denied
that her group's commercials are
misleading. She could not be reached
for more detailed comments.
Mary Jo Walsh, a Detroit spokes-
person for the People's Campaign,
said they would prefer to debate
"justice and fairness" rather than cost,

but must address the cost
because anti-abortionists have
it.

issue
raised

"We aren't getting bloody fetuses
(in advertising) anymore," said
Walsh.
State Treasurer Robert Bowman
appeared at a news conference with
Frey to unveil the ad and repeat the
theme that Michigan's welfare spend-
ing would increase if the abortions
are ended.
"Tax dollars used in this area will
go up anywhere between $100 mil-
lion and $200 million over the next
five years if citizens were to vote yes
on Proposal A," he said.

If a majority of voters vote yes on
the proposal, the state will stop
spending about $6 million a year on
Medicaid abortions.
The proposal would not affect
abortions paid for under health insur-
ance plans for state workers paid for
with tax dollars.
Gloria Steinem, who expressed
her support for the People's Cam-
paign last week at fund-raisers in four
Michigan cities, garnered about
$100,000 for the Campaign to make
its advertising program possible.;
Steinem was in Ann Arbor last
Thursday.
-Staff writer Lisa Winer
contributed to this report

Police arrest 240 protesters in D.C.

WASHINGTON (AP) - About 1,000
demonstrators created a commuter nightmare yes-
terday but failed to achieve their goal of blockad-
ing the Pentagon during a protest of American
policies toward El Salvador.
The demonstration, sponsored by a coalition
of a half-dozen peace groups, began at 5 a.m. and
extended into early afternoon. The protesters suc-
ceeded in forcing Defense Department to abandon
the huge parking lot south of the Pentagon -
which normally accommodates 3,700 cars - and
to run a human gauntlet through selected entran-
ces to get to their offices.

"But they didn't shut down the building; they
just created a lot of inconvenience and long
walks," said Pentagon speaker Glenn Flood.
Authorities said about 240 men and women
were arrested. There were scattered episodes of
fisticuffs between police and demonstrators.
Early in the day, police arrested several people
who sat in a road to block a military bus from
entering the parking lot.
One demonstrator sprayed red paint across the
front of a bus. When a Defense Protective Ser-
vice officer tried to arrest the demonstrator, pro-
testers pushed him to the ground and beat him

before other officers rescued him.
The demonstrators oppose U.S. aid to the Sal-
vadoran government, which has been engaged in
a war against freedom fighters since 1980. An
estimated 60,000 people have died in that con-
flict.
The protesters maintain the freedom fighters
want to negotiate an end to the fighting but that
the Salvadoran government - backed by the
U.S. - refuses to compromise in any way.

A sober beginning DAVID LUBLINER/Daily
Sorority members launch scores of black balloons in the
Diag yesterday to kick-off National Collegiate Alcohol
Awareness Week. The balloons symbolize the many
alcohol-related deaths that occur on college campuses each
year.

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Gunner
Continued from Page 1
suspect was distraught after being'
beaten and robbed last Monday night.
Rick Knowles said his uncle was
retired and lived alone.
"The police came in today. He
probably said, 'Leave me alone,"'
Council
Continued from Page 1
sues, so the administration won't
inake its own rules. For example,
the University has requested proce-
dures to enforce its new protest pol-
icy. The council, many say, should
discuss such procedures.
In the past, council members have
left meetings in frustration because
neither side was willing to compro-
mise.
Administrators say students have
not compromised because they refuse
to accept any student code. Students,
however, have criticized the
administration for trying to elimi-
nate the council instead of making it
more effective.
MSA has moderated its stance on
the code. Previously, MSA consis-
tently voted against any conduct
rules. But now, Murray said, MSA
Is trying to work with the adminis-
tration to make acceptable rules.
Vote
Continued from Page 1
ANOTHER BARRIER may
be registration. Alone among
democracies, only the United States
requires voters to register in advance
and on their own initiative. Other
countries, all with consistently
higher turnouts, let citizens vote ei-
ther by showing identification at the
polls or having state employees can-
vass neighborhoods and register peo-
ple at home, said Political Science
Prof. Steven Rosenstone, an expert
in voting patterns.
In a five-week drive that ended
October 11, Student Vote registered
6,200 students on campus, more than
any time since 1972.

Rick Knowles said. "They tried to
get in anyway, and he just popped
them."
A neighbor who identified himself
only as Ike said he had lived in the
same building as Charles Knowles
for the past two years.
"He had a history of being crazy,"
Ike said. "He always was the kind of
person who could snap at any time."

Recu
aid
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I ____________

The University of Michigan Medical School
Student Medical Research Program
is proud to announce
our
Thirty-Forth Annual
Fall Student Research Forum
Sponsored by
The Committee on Student Medical Research
October 19, 1988
Towsley Center
For Continuing Medical Education
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Contact Marcia Kennedy at 764-0219 for more information.

What*
multi-billion,
dollar
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has 45
stores
in the*
Northeast?

Perhaps We Should
Call Ourselves
The
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RanchK.C.MasterpieceKingsfordCharcoal
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LuciteMatchLightOlympicStainsSaladCrispins
SoftScrubTackleTilex
Company
Don't let our name fool you. Clorox is a Fortune 500
Corporation with 25 domestic retail brands and
many non-retail and international brands. Last year,
sales topped $1.2 billion. Next year we plan to do
even better.
Campus Interviews
We'll be interviewing at the University of Michigan
on October 31 and November 1. Interviews are by
appointment only. To arrange your interview contact
your Placement Office.
An Affirmative Action Employer
CLOROX

I

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