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October 14, 1988 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-14

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The Michigan Daily-- Friday, October 14, 1988 - Page 9

Full calendar

No

excuse

to watch Miami

Vice this weekend, pal...
Paillard charts
BY LEAH LAGIOS
TOMORROW evening, the delightful sound of 18th century music
will fill Rackham Auditorium where the Paillard Chamber Orchestra
will make its Ann Arbor debut. But many are already familiar with
them - their recording of Johann Pachelbel's "Canon in D," released
by RCA in 1977, became the best-selling classical recording of all
times.
Founded in 1953 by the French conductor and musicologist Jean-
Francois Paillard, the orchestra is comprised of 13 permanent mem-
bers. Under Paillard's direction, the talented and captivating group has
earned numerous awards for recordings of revived 17th and 18th century
music. Paillard has discovered a wealth of unknown music, making the
repertoire and programs of this orchestra very exciting and special. The
orchestra is known for performing neglected chamber music works of
all countries and periods.
Marking the opening of the University Musical Society's 1988-89
Chamber Arts Series, the orchestra will perform works by Fredrich
Handel, C.P.E. Bach, Francois Devienne, Jean Marie Leclaire, and
Claude Debussy. Music lovers may further relish the sound of Japanese
flutist, Shigenori Kudo, the featured soloist on the ensemble's program,
who was trained by Jean-Pierre Rampal.
Preceeding the concert, Richard Rosenburg, associate director of
orchestras at the University of Michigan School of Music, will discuss
the topic, "A Chamber Orchestra Is Not Just Fewer Players," at 7 p.m.
in Rackham Auditorium. This presentation is open to the public and
r free of charge.
THE PAILLARD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA performance begins at 8
p.m. in Rackham Auditorium. Tickets are available at Burton Tower
and range from $17 to $8. Special rush tickets will be available for
only $4, but must be purchased in person on Saturday, Oct. 15 between
9 a.m. and 12 noon. Two rush tickets limit per person. Contact the
University Musical Society at 764-2538.
#$ ei Film Fest
cals it a wrap
BY MARK SHAIMAN
THIS weekend the Program in Judaic Studies concludes its forum on "Jews
in American Cinema." And as is customary for such events, they have saved
the best for last.
Saturday night there will be a special presentation of the film The Chosen
Oat the Michigan Theater at 8 p.m. Though the film was made and released
years ago, this showing is definitely a special event because star Rod Steiger
will be present to introduce the film, and director Jeremy Paul Kagan will
speak afterwards.
Sunday brings more speakers to campus. At 3 p.m. in Angell Hall
Auditorium A, film critic Neil Gabler will be giving a lecture entitled "The
,Movie Moguls." The lecture is in conjunction with his newly published
book An Empire of Their Own: How The Jews Invented Hollywood.
The fest will conclude later that evening, at 7:30 p.m. in the same room,
when Gabler, Steiger, and Kagan will be joined by other film dignitaries to
'hold a panel discussion on "Jews in American Film, 1898-1988." Also
present will be film critic Judith Crist, director Arthur Hiller (Love Story),
,4nd SUNY professor of English and Humanities Lester Friedman.
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Chorus Line delivers weak kicks

BY MARISA ANAYA
A Chorus Line is the longest run-
ning Broadway musical in history.
Luckily, the University Musical
Theatre Program's version of A
Chorus Line is only running for one
week.
On Wednesday night, I witnessed
the dress rehearsal with the under-
standing that there might be some
mistakes, but an occasional forgotten
line is not what disturbed me.
Instead, the performers' low level of
enthusiasm surprised and dis-
appointed me, especially in a musical
of that magnitude that should be
electrifying on stage.
Many cast members were le-
thargic, making the long personal
histories of each character drag, no

matter how well-developed the in-
dividual characterization was.
A Chorus Line is a musical
about 17 dancers who strive to be
noticed in the cruel world of show
business, but are lucky if they get a
job in a chorus, where they are told
to conform to the others and not be
noticed.
Several actors deserve recognition
in their exceptional portrayals of
these characters, such as Elizabeth
Haas, who plays the feisty Diana and
sings the show's most memorable
song, "What I Did For Love." This
song brings each character, unique in
their own personal experiences and
hardships, together in a poignant
moment of shared desperation and
reminiscence.
Also, Courtney Selan successfully

captures the bitterness of Sheila, and
Andrea Carnick makes us laugh with
her humorous portrayal of the in-
nocent and dizzy Judy. However,
these brief flashes of talent are not
enough to save a show deficient in
energy.
Robin Murphy plays Cassie, a
dancer who realizes that she is not a
star and therefore decides to return to
the chorus, even though she's "better
than the rest." Although Murphy's
dancing and singing are entertaining
and virtually flawless, she seemed
tired and apathetic.
Alan Billings as set designer
succeeded in creating an effective set
which transformed the proscenium
stage into a cold, unfeeling audition
room. Zach, the casting director, was
positioned above and behind the
audience, causing him to sound like a
god with the power to determine the
dancers' careers by choosing or
cuttingthem.
Nevertheless, the successful set

design and staging, in addition to the
appropriate lighting and costumes,
were overshadowed by the general
lack of intensity in the performance.
Even the finale, the usually
spectacular "One" was not as sen-
sational as one would expect. The
dancing was devoid of the clean-cut
precision essential to a kick-line.
Of course, a dress rehearsal cannot
exude as much excitement as the
thrill of opening night, but the cast
will have to be more enthusiastic in
its performances this weekend to live
up to the audience's expectations of a
Tony-award winning musical.
THE CHORUS LINE is sold out
Friday and Saturday night, but tickets
are available for Sunday's 2 pam.
matinee. Performances have been
added next week on Tuesday and
Thursday at 8 p.m. All performances
are at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
and student tickets are $5.

Willard persists

BY MARIE WESAW
C ONSIDERING that Nancy
Willard received five Hopwood
Awards at the University, it's really
not that surprising that she's so
prolific now.
Willard, a native of Ann Arbor,
who currently teaches at Vassar
College, has published seven books
of poetry, a book of critical essays
and a collection of short stories and
lectures, and won the Newberry
Award for outstanding children's
literature for her book of poetry, A
Visit to William Blake's Inn.
Although Willard has been cred-
ited for her ability to present reality
as both bizzare and familiar, she
credits much of her success to
"persistence in the face of failure" -

For every work of hers that did get
published, Willard owns five
unpublished manuscripts.
You might ask if Willard, now
busy with two forthcoming books of
poetry and a play, has any time to
think about her Ann Arbor ties dur-
ing her childhood and years at the
University from 1958 to1963.
Well, she may not consciously think
about it, but Willard's critically ac-
claimed novel, Things Invisible to
See, is based in Ann Arbor.
NANCY WILLARD will be on
campus Oct. 14th through 18th as
the Alumnae Council's 1988
Alumna-in-Residence. Willard will
read from her works Sunday at 2
p.m., in the University Alumni
Center, 200 Fletcher Street.

O

OPEN WIDE !

OU

(

Free Mouthguard Clinic

)

Saturday, October 15, 1988
9:00 - 2:00 P.M.

-r- r-,

COLLEGE STUDENTS:
MONEY
is nOW available for your
EDUCATION
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN RECEIVING
Scholarships*, Fellowships*, Grants*
YOUR ELIGIBILITY IS GUARANTEED!
regardless oF tinancial status or academic performanc.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:

PREL
DAY
Visit with admissions officers
and deans from over 90 U.s.
law schools. Information on
admissions, pre-law courses,
career opportunities and more.

_AW-

The Students and faculty of
The University of Michigan
School of Dentistry w host
MouthguardDay -
A Custom mode mouthguard
will be fabricated free of charge
(occasionally a mouthguard
cannot be made because of
indMdual mouth shapes. Eveone
will be screened, and advise as
to whether or not one can be
fabricated for them)

Al ages are welcome
Parking Is available In the Fletcher St.
pa4h .g ot.
The UnIversity of Michigan
School of Dentistry
North University Ave.
Ann Arbor, Michgan 48104
Phone # 764-15 6
Located on the corner of N. University
and Fletcher St.
Pubic may enter through the mah
entrance off North University, or the
entrance off Fletcher St.

A BOLD
STATEMENT

TUESDAY, OCT. 18

AN

F4

10 a.m. to

2

p.m.

1-800-635-4063

A NATIO NAI. S.RVI(T (0MM I IThI)
"Ihewc Binds lDO)NOT' rcquircr rimllLr~nmlni
V \I)I INII( I IN \\(IAI AIVISOR', IR(RAM

Mich. Union Ballroom
530 S. State St., Ann Arbor, Michigan
Registration begins at 9 a.m. in the Union Ballroom

IF 11

Career Planning and Placement
A Unit of Student Services
The University of Michigan

I

: ___

Postion Availible

Assistant Treasurer for the
Michigan Student Assembly

No one delivers more hot,
fresh pizza than we do. In
fact, we deliver more pizzas
than all of the other pizza
places combined. Maybe
it's because of our guar-
anteed 30 minute delivery.
Or maybe it's the fact that
we use only the finest
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One thing is for sure:
Nobody Delivers Better"
than Domino's Pizza? Sure
it's a bold statement. But
judge for yourself. Call
us and see. We'll make a
believer out of you.
H sW
V

Responsilities

Include:

* Managing $500,000 annual budget.
* Maintaining MSA financial records on a computerized

bookkeeping

I __. 1 _ ._

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