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October 13, 1988 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-13

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-Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 13, 1988
Feminist leader Gloria Steinem
to visit 'U' for pro-choice vote
BY LISA WINER Arbor to raise money in hopes she will help Margy Long, a Planned Parentho
Well-known feminist Gloria Steinem will be them achieve their ultimate goal - a spot on the representative of the People's Campaign,.said;
in Ann Arbor today to encourage citizens to vote commercial airwaves to encourage more citizens believes Steinem is well-respected in Ann Ar
:"no" on Proposal A - the ballot proposal which to vote "no" on the proposal, said president of "(Her presence) is a way to get the word out,
would discontinue Medicaid payments for Students for Choice Molly Henry, a first-year (Steinem) knows that," Long said.
abortion in Michigan. Ann Arbor is one stop on graduate student in the School of Social Work. Campaigners have been "pleasantly surpris
her tour of Michigan cities that includes The campaigners also hope Steinem's appearance by a larger student response to Steinem's v
Kalamazoo, Lansing, and Detroit. will energize their supporters and make more than they anticipated, said Henry.
The People's Campaign for Choice - a voters aware of the proposal. "I've been getting a lot more calls fr
coalition of organizations that includes Planned One reason the campaign chose to approach students who want to help... I think a lot o
Parenthood, the National Organization for Steinem to speak in Ann Arbor was the interest has to do with Steinem... It seems like we've
Women, and the American Civil Liberties Union in the campaign she expressed when in town last on'someone who is pretty popular with a w
- and Students for Choice will sponsor year. "She was very supportive, and said she segment of students."
Steinem's informal reception at the Michigan wanted to do whatever she could to help." At that The reception will begin at 4 p.m. in
Theater. time, Steinem gave the campaign a generous theater's lobby. The cost is a $10 donation fr
Campaigners have brought Steinem to Ann contribtion students, and a $25 donation from others.

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Student urges rainforest preservation

BY STACEY .GRAY
At the current rate of rainforests
destruction, they will all be gone by
the first half of the next century, a
graduate student in the Environmen-
tal, Educational and Advocacy pro-
gram told about 15 people yesterday.
Speaking at a Brown Bag Lunch
Series, Mare Cromwell, a Natural
Resources graduate student, advocated
small changes rather than major ones
to preserve South American rain-
uns
Continued from Page 1
cheaper ammunition officers pur-
chase, and are subject to failure and
"flying apart," he said.
The Indiana University police,

forests.
"It is the small changes taking
place that are very positive," she
said. "This week is Tropical
Rainforest Week, and people need to
realize the problems that exist and
how these problems are connected to
their own lives."
But in the end, she said, the real
pressure for change has to come from
within the countries, not just from
well-intention outsiders.
who were issued weapons in 1973,
still use the .38 caliber revolvers,
except for the Special Weapons and
Tactics (SWAT) team on the
Bloomington campus.
THE UNIVERSITY'S de-
partment of Public Safety declined to
respond to repeated inquiries about
the weapons carried by their top two

After showing a videotape, "Our
Threatened Heritage," Cromwell dis-
cussed the endangered rainforests of
South America and what is being
done to protect them.
"When rainforests are cut down to
raise cattle and plant farms... it
demonstrates a real fast diminishing
returns rate. Although the newly
cleared rainforest land produces at
first, a few years down the road it is
no longer producing and those who

cleared it must move on, leaving be-
hind useless land."
She went on to discuss plans for
preserving the rainforests. One of the
most recent trends is to forgive
World Bank debts in affected coun-
tries. In exchange for the cancellation
of millions of dollars of debts, South
American countries place aside
agreed-upon amounts of rainforest
lands for preservation.

officers, Leo Heatley and Robert
Pifer, who are deputized under the
Washtenaw County Sheriff. Sheriff
Ronald Schebil suggested that they
operate under the county's guidelines
for "plainclothes deputies," which
allow for revolvers but not semi-au-
tomatic handguns.
Ann Arbor city councilmember
Jeff Epton (D-Third Ward) did not
approve of Police Chief Corbett's
action. "I'm real concerned. I'm
planning on doing something...
that's a council-level decision that
shouldn't be made by the police de-

partment."
Epton said he believes the coun-
cil's five democrats will support a
review of the decision. He added that
it seems to have become a partisan
issue, with the Republicans, who
outnumber Democrats 6 to 5, con-
tent to "relinquish responsibility" for
police actions.
Councilmember Ingrid Sheldon
(R-Second Ward) says she is "very
supportive of it [Corbett's deci-
sion]," but that she would be willing
to listen and contribute to a discus-
sion of the issue.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Dunn sues GOP for funds
LANSING - Republican U.S. Senate candidate Jim Dunn filed a law-
suit against his own party yesterday, saying a national GOP committee
crippled his campaign by breaking a $638,000 contribution promise.
Dunn's lawsuit names as defendants the Republican National Comr-
mittee and one of its arms, the National Republican Senatorial
Committee. It seeks an emergency injunction ordering the senatorial com-
mittee to come up with about $438,000 for his campaign.
Dunn said he received $200,000 from the committee, but was told he
wouldn't get the rest.
The former member of congress said he filed the lawsuit as a last resor
to get the money in time to pay for television ads before the Nov. 8 elecL
tion.
"You don't lightly choose to sue a national party. It was a tough decis-
ion to make," he said.
Palestinian bullets, grenades
may show change in tactics
JERUSALEM - Yesterday Palestinians hurled a grenade at a troop
bus, following the destruction of four Palestinian homes by Israeli
soldiers.
Noting an increased use of guns and grenades by Palestinian activists,
Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin suggested there had been a shift ii
Palestinian tactics from stones to more sophisticated weapons.
Rabin said he believed the use of bullets by Palestinians may be ar
effort to prod PLO leaders into taking a stand politically on negotiations
with Israel. He said that yesterday's incident was the third time grenades
had been used recently and that a village leader had been killed with aui
assault rifle by PLO enforcers.
PLO leaders have said Palestinian protesters had access to weapons but
had been instructed not to use them in confrontations with Israelis.
Mich. land bill sent to Reagan
WASHINGTON - Legislation regarding the transfer of 544 small
parcels of federal land to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources
was sent to President Reagan yesterday to be signed into law.
The 537 islands, located in Michigan lakes and rivers, cover a total of
1,500 acres. They won't come under state control for about six months
so people who believe they own the land will have time to press claims.
Rep. Dale Kildee, a Flint Democrat and author of the bill, said than
placing land under control of the Michigan Department of Natural Re-
sources would allow for more intensive management than the federal
government could provide.
Sen. Donald Riegle, D-Mich., a sponsor of the bill, said it would al
low the state to protect natural wildlife, fish, and plant habitats on the
islands.
Congress OKs military bill
WASHINGTON -Congress overwhelmingly passed legislation yes-
terday that authorizes the Pentagon to close unneeded military bases.
The Defense Department estimates that between $2 billion and $5 bil-
lion a year can be saved if it is permitted to pare down its list of 3,800
military installations.
"We know we cannot afford excess bases that we don't need... ," said
Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga., chairman of the Armed Services Committee.
The bill sets up a complicated base-closing procedure that essentially
cuts through the thicket of laws enacted by Congress in the past decade to
thwart Pentagon efforts to shut down bases.
Nunn and Sen. John Warner, R-Va., the ranking Republican on the
Armed Services panel, said that no list of bases to be closed has yet been
prepared.
No base closures would begin before 1990.
EXTRAS
Lonely tree replaces light
extravaganza at Domino's
ANN ARBOR (AP) - The Christmas lights at Domino's Farms,
which could be seen from US-23, will not be on this year, thanks to the
tremendous traffic problems last year's display caused.
"Last year's light display created unanticipated traffic problems for out
employees and neighbors," said Richard Brunvand, spokesperson fot
Domino's. Last year's extravagant show drew an estimated 450,000
visitors between early December and January, causing back-ups onto US

23.
Brunvand said the decision by owner Tom Monaghan was also due td
last year's whopping electric bill for the 270,000 lights in the display. It
cost the company "hundreds of thousands of dollars," said Domino's
Farms vice president for activities, Philip White.
This year, the company will erect a lone Christmas tree on its
corporate lawn.

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studies are offered in literature,
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Special program offered in theatre.
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Visits to the theatre, museums,
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For further information write or call:
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The Musical Theatre Program presents
Ufl4DE

Jostens Gold Sale F-or one week only.Order and save on the gold ring of your choice.
Mi)STENS
A M E R I C A S C O L LEG E R I N G
Stop by and see a Jostens representative
Wed. Oct. 12 - Fri. Oct. 14
11a.m. to 4 p.m.
to select a complete line of gold rings,
a X20.00 denosit is reauired.

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Book by
James Kirkwood a
Nicholas Dante

Conceived and originally choreographed by
Mchael Bennett
Music by
,nd Marvin HamischE

Lyrcs by
Edward Kleban

Co-choreographed by Bob Avian
Directed and choreographed by Tim Millett, Zach (the director) in the Broadway production
Music directed by Jerry DePult
Production based on original choreography

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