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October 10, 1988 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-10

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The Michigan Daily Monday, October 10, 1988 Pag@ 3

Reagan
feted, jeered
in Detroit

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BY N OAI FIN K I L
ANI) STEVE KN()P IER
PCECIAL 0t I'Ill' DAI LY
)TiTROIT ' Inkster resident
William McKnight says the U.S.
government is trying to control his
mi with a machine.
In fact, lie's so concerned, that he
snuck past Secret Service agents at
Detroit's Renaissance I lotel Friday
to shout his allegations to the
Presilent of the United States.
After a speech at a dinner party,
Rcagan told McKnight to write to
him at the White Ilouse about his
'problems.
Secret Service agents trial to
escort McKnight out of the buil(ling,
but he ref used to leave. "What do
.hey want to take me away for when
[he Prsident wants me to write hun
a letter?" said McKnight amid a mob
of political reporters.
McKnight, who has reportedly
heckled the president on other
occasions, snuck into the affair past
Secret Service agents.
McKnight was one of the only
partiers who said he didln't shell out
the $1,00) for a ticket to the dinner,
which Reagan attended to honor
IDetroit financier and GOP supporter
Max ,Fisher. In fact, some paid
$2,500 to get their pictures taken
with Reagan before the party.

The crowd was decked out in
tuxedos and fancy dresses. As people
walked into the dining room, they
were greeted by large cardboard
cutouts and wall-sized paintings of
Reagan and[. fisher.
Besides Mc Knight, other partiers
had their own ideosyncracies. Paul
I lohendorf, vice president and general
manager of the Roostertail, which
caterel the affair, didn't look like a
Republican. I(e sported a dollar sign-
shaped diamond earring and a pony
tail.
Ilohendorf said he catered this
party for free, but he once cateredl
Domii no'sPizza owner T onl
Monaghan's party for $1 million.
T[hen, he said, he bought a Bentley,
Jaguar, and an island. "Is that a
Republican attitude, or what?" he
asked.
But it was Reagan who took the
limelight. After lauding Fisher, he
spoke about more specific issues
thani he had in the earlier speeches,
such as crime, the death penalty, and
tak cuts.
"The liberals are singing the same
song now they sang (eight years
ago)," Reagan said, "and it sure isn't
'Don't worry, be happy.' It's more
like 'Please worry, he miserable."'

Pep
rally
fizzes
out
BY MARION DAVIS AN)
ROSE LIG'lItOURN
i)espite the eforts of the
Men's Glee Club, the Michi4n
Cheerleaders, and the co-captains
of the Wolverine Football Team,
a crowd of about 200 studenis
would riot "pep-up" at FIriday s
irue-Bclue Pep Rally on the Dial.
ilhe spirit and the crowd were
lanme. It wasn't too impressiv02"
said I SA senior Sue Ernest.
Cheerleaders tried to rally tloe
onlookers with chants of "Iet's
go BIhc'!" to little avail. David
Caplan, a Jnember of the cheering
st uad, explained the low
participation: "It's cold out and
they have rnidterms next week."
Wolverine football co-captains
Mark Messner and John Vitale
urged Michigan fans to get fired-
up over the traditionally rivalrous
game oetween Michigan and
Michigan State. "The louder you
yell, the better we play," Messner
said. "It's a part of the home field
advantage."
Sponsored by the Student
Alumni Council, the rally in-
cluded free balloons and even a
candy filled plilata named "Sparty
the Spartan," which spectators
were encouraged to abuse.
Michigan football coach and
Athletic Director Io Schembech-
ler was unable to attend the rally.

JESSICA GREENE/Dolly
President Reagan accepts a T-shirt from Adlai Stevenson fligh School student council pres-
ident Jill Boigegrain Friday on a campaign visit to the Detroit area.

That was the third speech Reagan
gave in the Detroit area on Friday.
Before, at noon, about 8,000
studlents, parents, and little kids
came to see Reagan speak at
StevensonI ligh School in Sterling
I leights.
Though Reagan made the Sterling
Ileights stop to promote Vice
President George Bush's campaign
and to encourage voter registration,
the 8,000 screaming spectators
seemed more interested in seeing the
President himself.
"I'm here because of my

children," said Sterling leights
residlent Gail Miller, mother of two
nine-year-olds. "It's a once-in-a-
lifetime chance for them."
Alter a 15-minute stop at the
hi1g1h school, Reagan and his
motorcade drove down the street to
Penna's, a local banquet hall, for a
speech in front of Macomb County
businesspeople.
The mostly Republican crowl -
each of whom paid $30 to see the
President and eat lunch -- cheeredl
Reagan each time he criticized
liberals. That was often - Reagan

said the word "liberal" 17 times
during the speech, almost one per
minute. Reagan's partisan app1eals
put the audience in the palm of his
hand.
"Some liberal organizations
believe that a separation of church
and state requires ending the Catholic
Church's tax excnption, or
removing the words 'under (god'
from the Pledge of Allegiance,"
Reagan said. "Is that what you
believe?"
The crowd responded with an
enthusiastic "no!"

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Candidates
rally to
register
Two candidates for the U.S.
I louse of Representatives - in-
cumbent Carl Pursell (R-Ply-
mouth) and Democratic challenger
liana Pollack - will encourage
students to register to vote at a
noontime rally today on the Diag.
Michigan Student Assembly
External Relations Committee
Chair Zachary Kittrie said a co-
alition of many national, state and
campus organizations the groups
would reach their goal of' regi-
stering 5,000 new students voters
during the rally. "This is Ann Ar-
bor's biggest student voter regis-
tration drive since students got the
right to vote in 1972," he said.
- By David Schwartz

'U' bridge club crosses troubled waters;
Y ALEX GORIDON It is exactly that kind of image being named a Life Master. used to stay up all night playing, selves from anything that relate to
Imagine singling off Roger problem that has plagued bridge on The University is. privileged to but with the Vietnam era it seems the previous generation."
lemens in your first Little League the college level for the last 20 years have one such Life Master among people wanted to disassociate them-
..,., ,..., .....,.3 1V :.._:.._ .. . ... _ f .E .. . . . . : . ., .:. . . . . . . _ .

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at hat, or returning an Ivan Lcndl
serve the first time you pick up a
tennis racquet.
In one sport currently making a
resurgence on campus, events like
these are a lot more than wishful day
dreams, they're common experi-
ences. In fact, one club member,
with a beginner as his partner, faced
the top ranked player in the world
this past summer in Baltimore at the
Summer Nationals.
That sport is bridge.
"What!?" the typical collegiate
sports fan might skeptically ask.
"Bridge, that's no sport, that's that
card game my grandparents and their
friends used to play on Saturday
nights. Yeah, I remember I used to
steal those little bologna sandwiches
out of the fridge before I'd go out."

according to LSA junior Josh Katz,
president of the newly formed Uni-
versity of Michigan Bridge Club.
The club, only in its second year
of existence, boasts about 30 steady
student members, as well as many
community regulars. Games are
played once a week at a new campus
location, the Michigan League. Pairs
of players compete in hopes o win-
ning points in the officially sanc-
tioned games.
A national organization, the
American Contract Bridge League
(ACBL), serves as a governing boxy
by keeping track of' points garnered
by organization members in club
games and tournaments all over the
country. Players begin as Novices,
and can eventually work their way
up to 300 points and the honor of

their ranks. Engineering sophomore
Steve Atlus, the club's treasurer,
earned the title this east August, a
rare honor for someone his age.
Currently he estimates that there
are only about 10 1Life Masters under
20 years of age in the United States.
The club is anxiously awaiting
the first round of the North Ameri-
can Collegiate Bridge Championship
on November 1. From set hands
played and judged that lay all across
the country, teams of four from each
of five regions and a sixth at-large
team will go on to compete in a na-
tional head-to-head competition in
Reno, Nevada.
By promoting. and teaching
bridge, Atlus hopes the club can
erase bridge's negative stereotypes.
"In the 50s and early 60s students

Cornerstone 'r
G I RIST I AN 1lE I'LOWS III'P
(an interdemoninational campus fellowship)
Students Dedicated to
Knowing and Communicating
Jesus Christ

Weekly Meetings:
,John NefT -

Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m.
219 Angell Hall
971-9150(0), 747-8831(11)

J

CORRECTION
Michigan Student Assembly President Mike Phillips included Hispanics
in his speech about campus minorities and racism at Thursday's
inauguration for University President James Duderstadt. The article said
Phillips mentioned only Blacks, Asian-Americans and Native Americans
during the speech.

AT

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AT&T Career Night

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THE

LIST

What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Speakers
"Remote Sensing: Science
or Art?" - Natural Resources
Prof. Chuck Olson, 1520 Dana, 4-
5 pm. Tea and cookies at 3:30 pm.
"A Feminist Approach to Arms
Control" - Sheila Tobias, 236 W.
Engine, 12-1 pm.
"Better Semiconductors
through Chemistry: The
Electronic Perfection of Gas
Surfaces via Sulfide
Reactions" - Dr. Claude
Sandroff, Bell Communications
Research, 1200 Chemistry, 4 pm.
"Ukraine and Gorbachev: An
Update" - Dr. Roman Soichanyk,
E. Conference Rm., Rackham, -8
pm.
Meetings
Grape Boycott - Guild House,
802 Monroe St., 5:30 pm, 747-
6927.
Ann Arbor Cage Bird Club
- Mike Underwood on
deforestation and diminishing
habitats of birds, Matthei
Botanical Garden, 1800 N.
Dixboro, 7 pm, 995-BIRD,
visitors welcome.
Christian Science

Furthermore
Israeli Military Objectors
Visit - Ann Arbor Public
Library, 7:30 pm, free admission,
public welcome.
Career Planning and.
Placement - Introduction to
CP&P, 3:30-4 pm, CP&P;
Researching Organizations and
Employers, 4:10-5:30 pm, CP&P;
Employer Presentation: Marshall
Field's, 7:30-9:30 pm.
Pre-Interviews - Lafarge
Corp.(construction), 1303 EECS,
5:15-7:15 pm; Intel Corp., time
and place to be announced.
U of M Taekwondo Club -
Fall classes meet M&W, 6:30-8:15
pm, 2275 CCRB, call Tim Frye @
662-8637 for more info.
Smoking Cessation Classes
- 8-week Freedom From Smoking
Clinic, 7-8:30 pm, Michigan
Medical Center(rm. 2c 108),
classes are $40 per person, offered
by the American Lung Association
of MI, to register call 995-1030.
Workshops on Admission to
Psychology Graduate
Schools - Pond Rm., Michigan
Union, 7:30-8:30 pm, sponsored
by the Dept. of Psychology.
Performances
.rovn Cnnference -

Wednesday October 12, 1988
3:30 P.M.-7:30 P.M.
North Campus Commons East Room
(Refreshments Served)
Students who will be Receiving their BBA, MBA or Bachelors,
Masters or Ph.D Degrees in CS, CE, EE, ME or IE.
Are Invited to Informally
Discuss Career Opportunities in the Following Areas

AT&T RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
AT&T APPLIED ENGINEERING

V AT&T MARKETING & SALES
QI AT&T FINANCE & BUSINESS

AT&T PROGRAMMING & MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
With Representatives From

AT&T BELL LABORATORIES

jM AT&T NETWORK SOFTWARE CENTER
SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES
L AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS GROUP
Q AT&T TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS GROUP

Q AT&T ENGINEERING, MANUFACTURING,
AND PRODUCTION PLANNING
VY AT&T BUSINESS MARKETS GROUP
V AT&T DATA SYSTEMS GROUP
L AT&T GENERAL MARKETS GROUP
QI AT&T NETWORK OPERATIONS GROUP

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