100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1988 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 7 -The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 3, 1988
Club

reaches
85-year
,mark
BY BERND STRUBEN
Today marks the 85th anniversary
of the University's Women's
Research Club, an organization
originally founded to encourage and
provide support for women involved
in research.
The group began when women
were not allowed to join the
Research Club, then open only to
men. They solved this problem by
forming their own club over eight
decades ago, and now meet once a
month to discuss their research.
The purpose of the club is still,
"much the same today as it was
when it began," said Classical
Studies Prof. Gerda Seligson, a
former president of the club.
Their organization differs from
the Research Club because it is open
to both full and part-time
researchers. "We don't insist on our
members being distinguished full-
time researchers, just that they do
research," said Marcia Dutton,
executive secretary of the club.
The club members are involved in
a variety of research including
literature, science, and history. Some
topics to be discussed in the
upcoming months include 'Heroines
in the French Revolution' by
Cecilia Dreyfuss, and 'Higher
Education in the United States,' by
Dearborn Chancellor Blenda Wilson.
Such a wide range of topics is
unusual among research groups,
which are normally more science-
oriented, Seligson said.
Today men are just as free to join
the Women's Research Club as
women are to join the Research
Club. Lately, there has been some
discussion of bringing the two
groups together, but so far nothing
has been resolved, Dutton said. She
fears this could result in the
alienation of some of their part-time
researchers who might not be
welcome in the Research Club.
Graduate students are welcome to
join the club, which currently
provides small interest-free loans to
students close to completing their
studies.
Seligson will address about 504
people in the club's monthly
0 meeting tonight in the West
Conference Room of the Rackham
Building at 7:15 p.m. Her speech,
'Great Expectations,' will address

Community Crisis
Center raises $300

BY LAUREN OSTROV
Rain interrupted the second an-
nual Home on the Park Saturday,
where six bands and seven speakers
were scheduled to perform in a bene-
fit for the S.O.S. Community Crisis
Center. But not before two bands and
two speakers were able to demon-
strate their support for the center and
help raise $300.
Johnny B. and the Big City
Buckaroos and Big Box of Nines
were the only bands able to play in
West Park, and only representatives
from Women's Action for Nuclear
Disarmament and the Latin Ameri-
can Solidarity Committee had an
opportunity to speak.
Both groups were spoke on their
purpose and how their issues are in-
tegrated with S.O.S. and should not
be dealt with separately, organizers
said.
"Home on the Park is a great
idea," said Alicia Diaz, a first-year
Residential College student,
"because everyone involved gets to
have fun, and it helps a lot of people
at the same time."
The rain started at 3 p.m., two
hours after the event had begun, and
most of the audience of about 80

left. When the rain let up, the re-
maining 20 people broke out a per-
cussion jam, which involved some
band members and the audience.
Forty-five minutes later, Flash-
back, the next band scheduled to
play, was told to get prepared. But
after a short while, the rain started
again, and the event was cancelled.
Although disappointed by the
weather, David Goldberger, from
Flashback, said the idea behind the
event is very important. "Groups
like the Homeless Action Commit-
tee and S.O.S. are trying really hard
to do great things for the commu-
nity," he said.
"The problems will not just go
away unless people realize that
housing restrictions have to be
changed, and low-income housing
must be encouraged rather than seen
as a low cash flow investment."
The S.O.S. Community Crisis
Center - started in 1970 by stu-
dents to help other students deal with
drug problems - has broadened its
focus and is now helping people
with almost every kind of problem.
The center is funded largely by
United Way, a county charitable or-
ganization. On Saturday, there were

volunteers going around with buck-
ets to collect money for funding.
The center, with a 24-hour hot-
line and walk-in service, responds to
people with any emotional needs or
crises, from academic problems to
not having anyplace to live. S.O.S.
cannot give people money, but they
do provide empathy and sometimes
food, and offer suggestions to the
callers or walk-ins about how to get
their lives in order.
There has been a very large re-
sponse to S.O.S., training coordina-
tor Marilyn Guenther said, and it
seems to "increase dramatically every
year, by a minimum of 25 percent."
One major project the center has
brought about is the opening of
Prospect Place in Ypsilanti. The
project houses homeless people or
families for up to 30 days, and even
provides food for one community
meal a day.
Right now the center is trying to
recruit volunteers to work at
Prospect Place and for the hotline
and the walk-in service. They are
also trying to encourage the county
to obtain more low-income housing,
although a definite program pertain-
ing to this goal has not yet been
formulated.

,
i
a
.+

JESSICA GREENE/Daily
Engineering recruiter Jeff Dawber, a California resident,
enjoys juggling while listening to Big Box of Nines at
West Park Saturday. The day of music and speeches was
eventually rained out.

LASC presents film series on Chilean conditions

BY LAURA SAGOLLA
. In an attempt to spark local
interest in Chile's volatile political
climate, the Latin American
Solidarity Committee showed the
first segment of a film series called
"Remembering Chile" this weekend.
Gor111as
Continued from Page 5
He wanted to let the filmmakers
know that "they were not there to
direct the gorillas, and they would
have to build some of their script
around the footage the gorillas gave
them."
Although the gorillas had a few
moments of uneasiness due to the
amount of people and equipment on
the scene, the production went
smoothly because most of the crew
had past experience filming wild
animals
Watts said saving the gorillas
involves not only caring about
them, but structual economic change
in Rwanda. "Tourism doesn't offer
any long-term solutions, and neither
do Hollywood movies," he said.

"Somos Mas," a video coverage
of a women's march put down by
police force, and "Chile: By Reason
or By Force," documented the first
massive Chilean protests in the early
1980s in respective showings Friday
and Saturday in East Quad.
LASC's attempt to spark interest
in Chile coincides with the 15th an-
niversary of General Augusto
Pinochet's military dictatorship.
This Wednesday, the nation will
hold a plebiscite - an election to
maintain or revoke a leader's power
- on Gen. Pinochet's continuance
in office.
A "YES" VOTE will ensure
Pinochet's stay. A "no" vote might
bring some form of change, if the
plebiscite is followed through hon-
estly.

LASC member Siri Strier, a
University graduate, conceded that
keeping the election honest is a
pretty big "if." "But if the vote is
"no," she said, "at least something
will happen."
"There's been a shift in the way
repression's being carried out," Strier
said of the Chilean government. On
the surface, opposition to the mili-
tary regime has been less fiercely re-
pressed lately, she said. "This is a
facade - they've just learned more
sophisticated ways of repression."
FORMED IN 1979, LASC at-
tempts to increase awareness about
the whole of Latin America. "We
look for information... testimonials
of people who have lived in the
situations," Strier said.
Three-year LASC member Hunter

VanValkenburgh said LASC's pur-
pose is to "support the legitimate
rights of self-determination of Latin
American peoples."
In the case of Chile, VanValken-
burgh said, LASC tries to "fill .in
the gaps of the mainstream press."
Because American coverage of
Chilean politics has been
unsatisfactory, LASC attempts to

spread the word about what really
- and underline 'really' - is hap-
pening," Strier said.
LASC WILL sponsor another
film about Chile on 'Oct. 8 -
"Memoirs of an Everyday War" -
outlining the personal stories of four
Chileans forced to take drastic risks
in defense of their rights.
By then, the vote for Gen.
Pinochet will already be in.

A one-day seminar designed to help you make the
transition from student to professional.
Saturday, November 5, 1988
The cost of the seminar is $10, and hotel
accommodations are available at a reduced rate.
Sessions offered this year include:
* Chemical Dependency in the Hospitalized Patient
" Coping Measures for the Oncology Nurse
" Financial Planning for the Young Professional
" Intensive Care of the Transplant Patient
" InVitro Fertilization
* Job Seeking Skills r'AI

"the art
languages."
the public.

of
The

reading foreign
meeting is open to

,-I% 1 ( l

II
Tues.
October 4

The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University Symphony Orchestra
Richard Rosenberg, conductor
Lowell Greer, horn
Beethoven: Symphony No. 3
Paisiello: Overture to Barber of Seville
Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Free

GIL SCOTT-HERON
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 8:00PM
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE, ANN ARBOR
CHARGE BY PHONE: 763-TKTS DETROIT AREA: 423-6666
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE MICHIGAN UNION TICKET
OFFICE AND ALL r2 - s
ECLIPSE PROGRAMS ARE MADE POSSIBLE IN PART BY GRANTS FROM:
Ntonal
'I A Ertown'nt
A , or he rts sc. alMa

" Nephrology
" Nursing and Outpatient Surgery
" Transition: Survival Techniques

'C-ALL COLLLCTI
507-286-7033
For Registration,
Information and Brochure

Transition is sponsored by
Rochester Methodist Hospital
A MAYO FOUNDAFKON H IA[ F I
Learning Resources Department
201 West Center Street
Rochester, MN 55902

Deadline for registration
is Oct. 24, 1988

For up-to-date program information on School of Music events
call the 24-Hour Music Hotline, 763-4726
Winner of the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction-
The National Bestseller Finally in Paperback
A NOVEL BY

i
i
i
i
I

r

r-

LASER QUALITY?
LESSER PRICE!
The HP DeskJet Printer.
HEWLETT
*Buy a Vectra CS PC #D1126A or #D1127A from
OCT. 3rd through OCT. 7th and receive a DeskJet
Printer #2276A FREE!
*Have a PC? Buy a DeskJet from OCT. 3rd through
OCT. 7th and receive the FX-80 emmulation module
#22707E or font module #22706A and cable #OTG-6
FREE!

_

U*
Own the sky
To fly is one thing. To fly with the Marine Corps is something
else. They'll show you the meaning of wings. From the wings of
the F-18 Hornet to the wings you wear as a Marine aviator,
this is flying at its best. And your ticket tofly is
your college diploma. If you'd like to be up
there, contact your local Marine Officer Selec-
tion Officer. 1-800-MARINES.

"I can't imagine
American literature
without it."
- I AMAHNI I lNARL s n e l A nsn s Tims

.;:

..........
......... ...........

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan