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September 30, 1988 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-30

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 30, 1988 - Page 5
Reception honors
Native Americans

BY TARA GRUZEN
Too few Native Americans are
coming to the University today, and
too few people today are exposed to
Native American culture, speakers at
an American Indian reception said
last night.
"We are the original Americans
and have a lot to say," said Charlotte
Heth, visiting professor of music and
director of the American Indian
program at Cornell University.
"What is needed in Indian Studies is
more Indian students."
Heth, who is visiting the Univer-
sity through the MLK/Caesar
Chavez/Rosa Parks Program, said-
she is trying to negate some stereo-
types of Native Americans. If more
Native Americans enter mainstream
society, using education as a door-
way, misperceptions about their cul-
ture could be minimized.
Although there are a few faculty
and staff members scattered
throughout University departments,
the number of Native American staff
and students is very small.
Ed Whitepigeon, a Native

American on the undergraduate ad-
missions staff, said he wants to re-
cruit more Native American students
with B averages for next year. All of
the current 32 Native American
first-year students had between a 3.5
and 3.6 grade average in high
school, he said.
"We have to get the parents in-
volved with the young people,"
Whitepigeon said. He said it is hard
for Indian students to go away, get
educated, and then try to return to
their reservations, where opportuni-
ties may be limited.
Mike Dashner, the Native
American representative for Minor-
ity Student Services, explained that
many American Indian students
aren't involved in minority programs
at all.
But one Native American busi-
ness school senior, who had never
attended a Native American function
here before, said he wants to be in-
volved with more people of his own
culture. "It's getting to be more ac-
cepted by society to be a minority,!
he said.

Student interns research physics

BY ELIZABETH RUTHERFORD
If you ever tried to erode your kid sister by
particle bombardment, if your superconductor
ranks among your closest friends, or if spending
your summer vacation calculating velocities,
mass, torque, or resistance sounds appealing,
then Pamela Mathias and Irene Solomon could
make you jealous.
Mathias and Solomon, both engineering ju-
niors, spent their summer working on the fore-
front of material science research at Argonne
National Lab in Illinois.
The Department of Energy holds a summer
internship program each year at Argonne in
which 200 interns conduct experiments with
professional scientists who work year-round at

the laboratory.
"It sounded like I'd have a good time," said
Mathias, who was selected from among 1,000
applicants.
Mathias said she eventually wants to research
the ceramics division of material science. "There
is a lot going on in the field," she said. "I can
have any sort of interest and probably be able to
study it."
The interns, chosen for their high grades and
good references, had to submit career goal state-
ments and choose an ongoing research project to
work on. The recipients were in contact with
their supervising scientists as soon as they were
accepted.
"He was always willing to help out," Mathias

said. "Argonne is a real informal place... The
scientists are real people."
While at Argonne, Mathias studied the rate of
erosion of some materials when they were bom-
barded by aluminum oxide particles - research
that could be used in the design of turbine engine
and helicopter blades.
The erosion rate of the various plastics and
metals, such as nickel, copper, and stainless
steel, were determined by calculating the ratio of
weightloss of the sample to the amount of alu-
minum oxide used.
Solomon studied superconducting wires,
which alleviate the resistance of conventional
metallic wires.

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Police Notes
Unarmed robbery
An Ann Arbor man was left
shoeless after he was attacked in the
500 block of Packard Street
Wednesday, Ann Arbor police said.
Sgt. Jan Suomala said the victim,
a 22-year-old Ann Arbor man, was
punched and knocked to the ground
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tennis shoes. Suomala said the vic-
tim knows the suspect, and an
investigation into the unarmed rob-
bery is continuing.
-Nathan Smith

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