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September 27, 1988 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-27

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, September 27, 1988

ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Tuesday, September 27, 1988

-4

Harvey
makes
the big
leagues
BY MARK SHAIMAN
MOST actors starting out in the
film business have to learn to take
rejection. Once they get established,
they had to learn to take direction.
Don Harvey had to learn to take
batting practice.
When Harvey, a Detroit native
and a University graduate, landed the
role of Swede Risberg, shortstop for
the 1919 Chicago White Sox, in the
new film Eight Men Out, h e
discovered he would need training in
more than the Stanislavsky method.
But while baseball training added to
the hard work normally required in
making a film, Harvey admitted he
had fun.
"We got there (Indianapolis), we
worked for two weeks with a base-
ball coach, the guy who played the
heckler. He is Ken Berry, he's a
coach for the White Sox and a
Golden Glove winner for three years
with the Chicago White Sox. He
was our coach, and so we hung
around with him for two weeks hit-
ting the ball around, throwing, bat-
ting practice. Can you imagine
leaving New York to go to Indi-
anapolis to play baseball everyday
from nine in the morning to five,
six in the night? It was like a bunch
of guys just hanging out."
And the practice gave the cast of
ballplayers, including John Cusack,
Charlie Sheen, and D.B. Sweeney, a
chance to meet before filming began.
"It got us all together. We had a
chance to iron out our egos with
each other, get to know each other,
and by the time we got to start
shooting we were pretty tight."
The players had to be pretty
tight, too, since they were all -
with the exception of Cusack's
character - involved in the fixing of
the World Series. Harvey, as Swede,
was one of the ring-leaders of the
scandal. But that didn't bother Har-
vey, who said he liked playing a
slimy character.
And Harvey is not afraid of being
typecast, either. "I wouldn't want to
play too many more. The Beast is

Scruffy's Massachusetts meow
Scruffy the Cat are from Boston by way of Iowa, or so I'm told. Scruffy - known for
the goofy, country-influenced garage-pop that earned them college radio success with their
debut LP Tiny Days - are an embarrassment to both the great Hawkeye State and the
semi-great Boston.
Hepsters allsover America know about the excellent Iowa scene via Southeast Records'
Iowa Compilation. Boston, on the other hand, is known for 4AD records. Enough said.
There ARE some great Boston-area bands, but you probably haven't heard of them. The
Volcano Suns, Dredde Foole and the Din, and Dinosaur are all mighty purveyors of great,
driving rock and roll. For the most part, however, they are shamefully ignored by the
moronic, hipster wannabe collegiate poseurs endemic to any big college town. As further
evidence of the Boston area's non-total lameness, the best fanzine in the world, Forced
Exposure, hails from wonderful Waltham, Massachusetts.
If you're a fan of harmless, boring music, go see Scruffy the Cat. You won't be
disappointed.

- Brian Berger
SCRUFFY THE CAT at

For those still interested, East Lansing's 11:55 opens up for
the Blind Pig tonight at 9 p.m. Tickets are $5.

ANN ARBOR'S

i

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CHURCH OF CHRIST
(Followers of Jesus Christ using the Bible
as our only guide anal authority.)
Invites YOU to Worship with Us

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kind of the same way, and Casualties
of War, which is a film I did with
Brian De Palma, starring Sean Penn,
Michael J. Fox, and me, is pretty
much the same kind of character -
even worse.
"But I am an actor and I think
people know that. They see me play
a part like that and if I played it
badly, they would say that is all I
can play, but if I play it well" - he
did - "then people say he is inter-
esting. And I don't think my face in
itself suggests anything that is par-
ticularly mean. That is just the way
I played the character."
But he does hope for different
roles in the future. "I'm looking
forward to a sympathetic part. That
is something I would like to get in
the next two movies. In the next
film I would like to play the lead."
With two films soon to be re-
leased, he doesn't feel hurried to do
another, so he is returning to his
stage roots in a small production of
Tennessee Williams' The Glass
Menagerie. "This is basically for me
just to be back on stage and flex my
chops," Harvey says. "While honing
my film techniques I lost a bit of
my theater. So this is going to be
* - 0
" " apparel
* jewelry
: "* accessories "
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-. 4
good for me." Coincidentally, he is
going to play the role of Tom,
which John Sayles, the director of
Eight Men Out, has also played and
won acclaim for.
At age 28, Harvey feels that his
career is falling into place as well as
he could hope. "This is just right.
This feels just perfect. I was in no
hurry; I went to graduate school. If
was in a hurry, I would have gone 4
straight to New York and tried to
make it. I would rather get recog-
nized at the point where I am enter-
ing my thirties rather than get very
popular when in my younger twen-
ties. Because if I start to change a
lot, then people will always see that
young guy. When you start to
change, to mature, it is a hard time
making that transition. You have
more of a steady career when you
start in your thirties."
Harvey's career has gone well so
far. He had small parts in both
Creepshow II and The Untouch-
ables, and now with Eight Men Out
he is moving into larger roles. But
he doesn't plan to stop there. "It's
good to get something that I can
sink my teeth into," he said, but
added, "Now I need a lead."

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Tel: 233-2032/233-281

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The Miehga aily,
* Wed. Sept 28

I

4

-r

WE'RE HAVIN' A COMEDY JAM!
LAUGIl RACK
Stand tp Coned
FEATURING

TIM HARROD

JIM McCLAIN

and
BRENT CUSHMAN
With Student Comedians
Jeff Goad and Tom Franck

I

U 'II U ~Ti I '~E I U h~!.&~iU i turn iu UU.~ I lEA U 5

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