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September 08, 1988 - Image 22

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-08

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Page 22 - The Michigan Daily- Thursday, September 8, 1988

UNIVERSITY

Struggling
Continued from Page 19
first and that's what they think about when they
protest," she said. "This University would not be the
way it is without student protest. Leaders (of protest)
have a 'this is what we want' attitude."
Michigan Student Assembly Vice President Susan
Overdorf says protest is vital to campus life.
"University of Michigan students have the opportu-
nity to learn about a variety of issues through campus
activism. Furthermore, students can influence Univer-
sity and government policy," Overdorf said. "Student
.activism on this campus has a long history of fighting
militarism, racism, sexism, homophobia, and adminis-

trative control."
But for reasons ranging from ignorance to apathy to
jaded cynicism, some students ignore protest and
choose not to get involved. One University rule makes
the choice for involvement more difficult. The rule
says that loud Diag rallies can only be held between
noon and 1 p.m. - and all events that "generate a high
level of noise or activity" must be registered with the
Student Organization and Development Center which
distributes "Diag authorization forms."
Some students do not want protest. Linda Burns, a
recent LSA graduate said protest "doesn't do a thing,
although I'm glad people protested against Kirk-
patrick."
Burns referred to a protest at last May's graduation,
organized by the Latin American Solidarity Commit-

tee, against the awarding of a University honorary de-
gree to former U.N. ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick.
Along with Kirkpatrick, LASC also protested Central
Intelligence Agency recruitment on campus last year.
In both cases, the issue was U.S. policy in Central
America - and the University's perceived con-
donation.
"The University is an undemocratic, authoritarian
institution. The majority of students and employees
have no voice in how it's run. So the only way to bring
about change is to create enough heat," LASC member
Mark Weisbrot said.
Weisbrot said protest has significant influence on
administrative policy when an institution that is being
protested has something to be embarrassed about.
Weisbrot describes those who protest as people who

"care about the future of the University, community
and country."
Caring encourages unity and students find "there is
a good deal of social support for those involved in
protest," Eldersveld said.
And, in many cases, there are results as well.
The Daily, April 18, 1988:
"Vietnam veteran Charles Tackett is willing to die
for a veterans' national holiday. And next Monday, he
plans to begin starving himself to death on the Diag,
protesting a University rule which forbids an all-day
rally supporting the holiday."

The Daily, May 6,1988:
"The University gave (Tackett) permission
his holiday in Regents' Plaza."

to hold

.,

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