100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 16, 1988 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

coma r t - . s 1

-

w O

11.,T--

w

I

Furthermore

VOLUME 7, NUMBER 2

1Ul be Ilirigau i ai1l

SEPTEMBER 16, 1988

X!77 j

-_
-_

Jv-I

--

w

__ _ _ _

I

. . _

I-

FRIDAY
"RUN FOR THE ROSES"
PEP RALLY - 7 p.m., Alpha
Delta Phi House, 556 S. State
Street
All are invited to the ninth

annual pep rally to cheer on the
Wolverines in their opening home
game. Donations will benefit the
Ann Arbor Ronald McDonald
House.
"CITY AND SUBARB"
SYMPOSIUM - 5 p.m.,
Rackham Auditorium

The College of Architecture and
Urban Planning will feature
speakers and discussions.
"CHALLENGE,
OPPORTUNITY AND
TOMORROW'S AMERICAN
AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY"
FORUM - 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.,
Hale Auditorium, School of
Business Administration.
Top auto executives will talk
about future career opportunities in

the automobile industry.
CENTER FOR RUSSIAN &
EAST EUROPEAN
STUDIES WINE AND
CHEESE RECEPTION -
4:30 p.m., Lane Hall Commons
Room.
All are invited.
WOMEN'S CRISIS
CENTER TEA - 5:30-7 p.m.,
306 North Division.
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB -
2-4 p.m., Mich Room, Union.
Beginners and advanced signers
are welcome. Call 763-3000 for
more information.

A
alter
"DC
WI'
W-
Auc
P
the
UN
AP
Uni
Al

M A G

- ____7

ow

oniiiiii-M-9

1 _

w
A

Z I N E

m

- w

CHRONOLOGY

Continued from Page 11

criticized for granting too much dis-
cretionary power to the administra-
tion, exempting faculty and adminis-
trators from punative action, and
lacking a clear definition of racism.
The issue of regulating acts of protest
is eclipsed as the focus of the conduct
debate shifts to the issue of racist be-
havior and speech.
February 9, 1988: The admin-
istration refuses to participate in a
public forum involving student gov-
ernment and faculty members on the
proposed discriminatory acts policy.
February 29, 1988: President
Fleming's revisions of the
discriminatory acts policy make it
specific to racial and sexual
harassment. Sanctions against some
acts of speech such as racial slurs are
included.
March 18, 1988: Several stu-
dent groups, including the Black Stu-
dent Union and UCAR, affirm the
need for a policy to deal with racial
harassment during the public com-
ments section of the Regents meet-
ing.
March 13, 1988: MSA recon-
siders stand ona discriminatory acts
policy in an effort to form a united
front with minority groups, but is

not willing to impose sanctions for
acts of speech. Students are divided
March 18, 1988: The Regents
vote 5-2 to adopt Fleming's proposal
to deal with discriminatory acts. Re-
gents Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor) and
Veronica Smith (R-Grosse Isle) vote
against the proposal.
May 1, 1988: The student dis-
criminatory acts policy goes into ef-
fect.
April 29, 1988: Student
protesters disrupt a University-spon-
sored forum for Jeane Kirkpatrick.
May 19, 1988: Citing the
Kirkpatrick disruption, Regent Baker
suggests the University needs rules
governing protest rather than
discriminatory behavior. Baker asserts
that students who engage in protests
that "exceed the normal bounds of
acceptable University behavior"
should be arrested and expelled. The
Regents' discussion centers around
the need for a conduct policy to
regulate protest. Fleming promises a
response. The conduct debate is
shifted back to the issue of political
expression.
June 16, 1988: The Regents
extend the discriminatory acts policy
to University faculty and staff.
July 21,1988: Fleming's mem-
orandum to "deal with disruption of
University activities" is adopted by
the Regents. Guidelines drafted by
the Civil Liberties Board are codified

as official policy and dictate that
protesters will not be allowed to ex-
hibit "undue interference" during
University-sponsored events. Flem-
ing's memo calls on the University
"to improve our security posture by
deputizing two of our Public Safety
officers with the power of arrest."
August 1, 1988: A coalition
of student groups form the Campaign
for a Democratic Campus. CDC de-
mands that the Regents stop the dep-
utization of campus security officers,
rescind the guidelines for political
expression, and secure the continued
existence of the U Council.
September 1, 1988: James J.
Duderstadt becomes the president of
the University and pledges to support
the implementation of Fleming's
new policies.
September 2, 1988: The
University administration and Washt-
enaw County Sheriff Ronald Schebil
sign a letter of agreement. The
Director of Public Safety Leo Heatley
and the Assistant Director Robert.
Pifer are sworn in as full deputy
sheriffs and granted the power to ar-
rest students for violations of state
September 6, 1988: The Daily
learns that Assistant Director Bob
Pifer was allocated University funds
in July 1988 to attend an FBI train-
ing seminar in St. Louis. N

swea

_
4.. ' -, J<7
;;/ y
N>
~'/

i' ' ' !'il!' '
V

Willem Dafoe plays a Christ tempted by passion.

Music
Local Talent, Mr B., cuts new album with J.C. Heard
Film
One of the last area drive-in is still reeling it off.
Cover Story
New "U" policies makes disruptive protest a 1 0
crime.
Restaurant
Delong's Bar-B-Q Pit: spicy, tender, crunchy, I 6
amazing.
The List
What's going on in Ann Arbor this weekend.
EDITOR..........................................Stephen Gregory
ASSOCIATE EDITOR.......................Brian Bonet
BUSINESS MANAGER..............................................Jein Kim
SALES MANAGER......................Jackie Miller

MARY ID
S. University at
663-2311

COVER
STORY
Continued from Page 14
Coleman both believe that
deputization obscures rather than
clarifies the issue of accountability.
Both emphasize the woeful inade-
quacy of the Board of Regents to
serve as the body of oversight and
the solesavenue for redress of
grievances in the case of wrongful
actions.
In fact, observed Epton, "there is
no regulator of campus police. The
regents can hardly be described as
locally elected officials. They are
never here... Campus security will
even be less accountable if they
have the power of arrest than they
have in the past."
Coleman also pointed out that
Ann Arbor city police are much
more closely - albeit often imper-
fectly - regulated. "At least you
can bug your City Council member
when there is a problem with the
police."
"Look," added Epton, "The pro-
liferation of police forces always
leads to bad shit for real people."
Under the Eyes of
the Deputies
More than anything, Sheriff
Schebil said with a sigh, "I would

hope we'd never get to the point
where we're throwing rocks and
bottles back at each other, and the
police are shooting rubber bullets
and tear gas and things. I hope
we've grown out of that... Just off
the record, is it going to be a hot
fall on campus?"
Is it going to be a hot fall?
Members of the Campaign for a
Democratic Campus are making
plans but no predictions. Currently
engaged in a grassroots educational
campaign, CDC hopes to increase
student understanding about the
implications of the new protest
policy and the role of the Univer-
sity deputies. -
Epton said he perceives that or-
ganized political activity at the
University is increasing. But
whether tear gas and rubber bullets
fill the air this fall or not, Epton
said students should realize that the
recent policy changes by them-
selves threaten political expression
on campus. "Even if the University
hadn't already demonstrated its hos-
tility to political speech and dis-
sent, the very idea of creating a
second police agency is itself a
threat to dissent and political
speech."
Is it going to be a hot fall?
Coleman predicts that it will cer-
tainly be confusing one. "I think

there could be all kinds of prob-
lems." First, people who confront
the authorities will find that the
agencies of enforcement have
changed. Second, when both Uni-
versity deputies and Ann Arbor po-
lice respond to a protest situation,
"differences in opinion and points
of conflict may arise."
And, she pointed out, the role of
civil disobedience as a vehicle for
non-violent political expression
will have to be rethought.
"Students at the University need to
be prepared to make decisions of
arrest. When you decide to do civil
disobedience, you are in that deci-
sion out of conviction. You have
chosen to be arrested and you are
willing to face the consequences."
But the creation of University
deputies makes such principled acts
of conscience more difficult, said
Coleman, who over the years has
visited the jail cells of many stu-
dent protesters. "What happens if
two people on the University staff
can arrest people when they feel
like its called for? In what cases
will students be arrested? How will
students be aware of the cir-
cumstances under which they will
be arrested? I'm just not clear. And
if I'm not clear, I'm sure a lot of
students aren't either. What's going
on? And why is this happening?"

ENSI
ALL-CAMPUS YI
IReguiar Meet

SqN

ACO$MOPOLIAN WORLD ATLASi
The best known, best selling atlas title in the Rand McNally
line for more than 30 years. ,..$&&.e $21.98

I P

NITERSAwiTELSn
U T he niew Revised Edition .$4&:e8

$19.98

After wordsl
Quality Books at uncommonly low prices

EST. i

Cover photo by Jack Stubbs

996-2808

219 S. Main

Ann Arbor, MI

m

PAGE 2 WEEKEND/SEPTEMBER 16 WEEKEND/SEPTEMBER 16, 1988

WEEKEND/SEPTEMBER 16,'l 988-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan