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September 16, 1988 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-16

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 16, 1988 -- Page 11
Campus construction
continues on its course

BY NOAH FINKEL
Upon returning to campus this
term, students have had to get used
to the sometimes deafening and al-
ways distracting sounds of cranes,
drills, bulldozers, and other machines
used in the construction and renova-
tion of many of the University's
buildings and structures.
On eastern central campus, con-
struction of a new $45 million
Chemistry Building is scheduled for
completion by spring 1989 and will
be operational by next fall.
Paul Spradlin, director of Plant
Extension said, "They're making
excellent progress. One can see that
the whole exterior is just about fin-
ished."
M. DAVID CURTIS, chair of
the chemistry department said the old
building, originally constructed in
1908 and expanded in 1948, could no
longer meet the department's needs.
"We have needed new space for

the last 20 years. We have no meet-
ing spaces, no office spaces, and our
teaching labs are no longer safe
enough to conduct many experi-
ments," he said.
"The new building is state of the
art.,
Nearby, a new pedestrian bridge
between the Randall Laboratory and
West Engineering is now operational
despite not being complete. The
bridge is part of a long-term goal of
connecting University buildings by
walkways "wherever feasible,"
Spradlin said.
BUT to physics Prof. Lawrence
Jones, the bridge serves a more im-
mediate purpose since much of the
Physics department is moving from
Randall to West Engin.
"[The walkways is a cost-effective
way for the department to be cohe-
sive as it moves to West Engin...
That's very important for the intel-
lectual health of the department."

Across the Diag the construction
of a new computing center in the
courtyard of Angell Hall should be
operational by next spring. Spradlin
said the $3.9 million computing
center will house 300 computers to
help meet the campus-wide demand
for computers.
North Campus is also getting a
bit of a face lift, with a $4.4 million
expansion of the North Campus
Commons. The Commons will
roughly double in size and be com-
pleted and operational by fall, 1989.
FRANK CIANCIOLA,
director of the Michigan Union, said,
the center, similar to the MUG in
the Union, will include an array of
retail services inside the Commons,
such as fast food restaurants, a travel
agency, and a copy center.
Cianciola said the enlargement of
the Commons will fill a void on
North Campus. He said the new
commons will provide a place where
the north campus community can
congregate to eat and socialize.

DAVID LUBLINER/Daily'
Students pass beneath a crosswalk connecting Randall Laboratory and West Engineering. The passenger bridge, built
last spring, is part of ongoing campus construction.

Local Vietnam veteran closer 7
to goal of national holiday -

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ
Col. Charles Tackett, a long-time proponent of bet-
ter compensation for Vietnam veterans, may be one
step closer to realizing his dream of a national holiday
for Vietnam veterans.
Tackett, in conjunction with the Michigan Student
Assembly, recently mailed two resolutions concerning
war veterans to the 50 state governors and 100 U.S.
senators. Although the last letters were sent out
Wednesday, Tackett has already received responses from
four governors and has garnered the support of two
Michigan legislators.
Tackett said yesterday that he is encouraged by the
response thus far. "I'm surprised I'm getting feedback
so quickly," he said.

In addition to proposing a holiday to honor Vietnam
veterans, Tackett asked the governors and senators to
introduce legislation which would give U.S. soldiers
involved in any foreign conflict the same status as war
veterans.
"I hope that they'll review (the resolutions) and I
also hope that they'll pass them," Tackett said. "Then
I'll have strength to go to Washington (to lobby)."
In Tackett's proposal, the holiday would be held an-
nually on May 7, the day in 1975 when President Ger-
ald Ford officially approved the final withdrawal of
troops from Vietnam.
In Michigan, state Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann Ar-
bor) and state Sen. Harmon Cropsey (R-Decatur) have
both introduced bills into their respective legislative
bodies to create the May 7 holiday.

Tuition
0ontinued from Page 1
autonomous from state control.
Blanchard was unavailable for
comment yesterday, but State Sen.
V(illiam Sederburg (R-East Lans-
iqg), chair of the Senate Higher
Education Appropriations Subcom-
sn ittee, said the University should
r hive kept the 12 percent increase.
Sederburg said the 7.5 percent tu-
ition increase figure is misleading
because it doesn't reflect the fee in-

crease. Now, he said, the University
can still raise student costs the same
amount, yet the 12 percent figure
will no longer hurt the University's
image in the state. "Evidently they
aren't concerned about what it costs
students," he said. "They're con-
cerned about getting good press."
THE RECOMMENDED in-
crease for in-state students, including
the fees, totals 9.9 percent.
Michigan Student Assembly Ex-
ternal Relations Committee chair
Zachary Kittrie said the fees will not
be reflected when the University re-
leases its tuition figures. "Fees are a

disguised form of tuition," he said.
"They're not apparent to students
who are evaluating whether to come
here or not."
Kittrie said the problem lies
within the University's budget pro-
posal, which MSA will begin scru-
tinizing, with the help of a newly-
hired budget analyst. "We are going
to try to recommend ways to trim
the University budget while main-
taining quality," Kittrie said.

ELLEN LEVY/Dolly
Run With it
Cindy Wyels, a University graduate student and captain of the Women's Polo Team
runs the stairs of the University stadium. This is the first season the Water Polo
Team is recognized as an official club sport.

The U-M Students of Objectivism Presents
Peter Schwartz
Individualism vs. Collectivism
The Right and Wrong
Solutions to Apartheid
Tuesday, September 20, 1988 8:00pm
Angell Hall Auditorium B
no charge
For more information call 663-6142
Co-sponsored by the Ayn Rand Institute.

ANN ARBOR'S OWN
COMEDY THEATER TF

ROUPE

~MAGAZINE

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