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September 14, 1988 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-14

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4

Page 10- The Michigan Daily -Wednesday, September 14, 1988

AZT 7111-

JU7N

Doug in Deep-
BY DOUG VOLAN
Everyone has heard the hoopla about the brawl
August 23 in Harlem, N.Y., between heavyweight
boxing champion Mike Tyson and Mitch Green.
Not everyone, however, has heard about my
encounter with the gentleman Green.
Ten days ago, I stumbled across Green in lower
Manhattan. He was just returning from a meeting with
his lawyer when I inquired about an interview. "You
want an interview?" Green shouted.
In the blink of an eye, Green leaped out of his
sports car. He had all the answers before I even asked
the questions.
Here's what he said:
"TYSON'S A SISSY," Green said, going on
in about what names he had called Tyson and his wife,
sitcom star Robin Givens, to Tyson's face.
"And he still won't fight me," Green said. "What
do I have to do. to fight him?
"He hit me and ran and now he won't fight me.
(I'll) do anything to get this fight. If he's so bad, why
won't he fight?
"Wait a second."
With that, Green turned around, reached into his
car, and pulled out an ugly toy doll.
"This is what I'm going to do to Tyson." Green
ripped off the doll's shorts, flicked the doll's head back
and forth with his finger tip, and blurted: "Then this is
what I'm going to do to his dumb, ugly head."
By this time, a horde of onlookers had
accumulated, and before I knew it, it turned into a mob

Tyson's nemesis
looking for Green
scene with hundreds of people shoving paper into his
face for autographs.
GREEN was only too happy to oblige, and the
crowd crushed in on me. But I figured I had to get in
one question before this interview was up.
"Will you fight him for charity?" I shouted.
"Charity!" Green responded. "I AM charity! I want
the belt."
I quickly departed, happy to still be in one piece.
But walking away, there was no question in my mind
that Green had set up this whole thing. He purposely
provoked the altercation with Tyson in hopes of
getting a rematch (Tyson previously defeated Green by
a technical knockout). What else would Green be doing
outside a clothing store at 4 a.m.?
What easier way to make a few million bucks?
Adding insult to injury, Green pressed charges
against Tyson, who broke his hand during the
squabble. Green then informed the public that he
would drop the charges if Tyson agreed to a rematch.
TYSON, being the good Samaritan he thinks he
is, responded by offering to fight Green for charity,
which Green has shrugged off. After all, he IS charity.
Although Green recently dropped the charges, he
continues to gallop around New York City taking
advantage of the free publicity. If he's not on a
television or radio talk show, then he's preaching his
gospel on the street to whomever is willing to listen.
The fight probably will take place. After all, this
is what the public wants to see.
The sad fact is that Green will benefit whether or
not there is a fight with Tyson. As a result of his
clever setup, Green has turned himself into a legend.
He is much smarter than he acts, isn't he?

W alK mis way
Boycott of ceremonies off

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -
Olympic officials yesterday averted a
U.S. boycott of the opening
ceremonies, then took on the drug
issue by unveiling a state-of-the-art
testing center and a new, get-tough
rule.
A U.S. boycott of the opening
ceremonies would have affected
athletes from the state of Michigan
such as Wolverine baseball player
Jim Abbott, Wolverine swimmer
Mike Barrowman, and Central
Michigan basketball player Dan
Majerle.
U.S athletes were so upset over a
plan by organizers to limit the size
of teams marching in Saturday's
opening ceremonies - effectively
leaving out about half of the 611-
member American team - that they
threatened to stay away en masse.
Within hours the International
Olympic Committee and Seoul
Olympic Organizing Committee
retreated and said any athlete who
wanted to take part could do so.
VOLLEYBALL player Robert
Partie said the ceremony is a big part
of the Games. "We've been looking
forward to doing it, and it would be a
shame if it didn't work out," he said.
Evie G. Dennis, chief of the U.S
mission, said the restrictions,
designed to reduce participation from
13,000 athletes to 8,000 and speed
up the show, were not acceptable and
were resented by the Americans.
"Every American who has a right
to compete here feels that the chance
to march in the opening ceremonies
is the culmination of the Olympic

Abbott
... Olympic hurler
dream itself," said Mike Moran,
spokesperson for the U.S Olympic
Committee.
"Any athlete who represents his or
her country and could not march
would have a disappointment
probably exceeding any failures they
suffered on the playing field," he
said.
Disappointment looms for drug
users and dealers under the Olympics'
high-tech testing system and anti-
drug program.
DRUG DEALERS could be
banned from the Games for life under
the resolution adopted by the IOC.
"We believe in two things in the
fight against doping - sanctions and
education," said PrinceAlexander de
Merode of Belgium, chair of the
IOC's medical commission.

"Education is the first step, but we
need strong sanctions as well."
The IOC's executive board will
have the power to impose penalties
that "may extend to life exclusion
from all forms of competition in
whatever manner in the Olympic
Games or in any other competitions
organized under the auspices of the
IOC or with its patronage."
The IOC agreed unanimously at
its 94th session that people who
make, distribute or finance the
purchase of any of the more than 90
items on its list of banned substances
should be barred from all Olympic
involvement.
The only exception, the IOC said,
would be doctors, pharmacists and
other members of the medical
profession treating patients.
Officials also showed off a $3
million drug-testing center filled with
computers, chromatographs and mass
spectrometers set to begin the
analysis of urine samples of all
medalists and a random sampling of
other athletes
"Athletes who use drugs now are
imprudent, ill-advised, or just plain
stupid," said Dr. Robert Dugal, a
member of the IOC's medical
commission.
Angel Myers, a U.S swimming
star, already has been disqualified for
the use of steroids, as have four
members of the Canadian
weightlifting team. All were caught
by tests in their home countries.
The lab here will receive up to
about 200 samples a day.
"It's mostly the athletes who use
the steroids who get caught," said lab
director Dr. Jong Sei Park, a
University of Maryland professor
who has spent the last three years
preparing for the Games.

I U

WELCOME BACK
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AND
LAUG RACK
sland' p (c"d
FEATURING ALL TIME FAVORITES
GARY HARDWICK
AND
ROB TAYLOR
With your Host
PETER BERMAN
WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 14
IN THE U-CLUB
10 P.M.
IN HONOR OF THE ENTERING CLASS...
92C ADMISSION FOR EVERYONE!!
t. , mP61 . pA ,~,I C1 B
C".,5:" : , C t . 11 :: !P

CLASSIFIED ADS!
Call 764-0557

A

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

Michigan Daily
SPORTS
763-0376

i

a

RECREATIONAL SPORTS
Don't forget to Sign up your Children for the

RHDIION9I I
Have an Impact

I

I

Children's Sports - 0 - Rama Proaram.

Saturday morning program designed for children ages
4-10 providing time for structured supervised
recreational activies inl gymnastics, ball skills,
and swimming.
For more information and fees, call 763-4560.
Registration begins Thursday, September 15 at
the North Campus Recreation Building.
*IM ALL CAMPUS GOLF TOURNAMENT
ENTRIES ARE DUE Thursday, September 15
4:30pm Intramural Sports Building

No acting experience or preparation necessary to audition.
For further info call Scott Weissman 769-0500

For Men and Women

Offering varied skill levels

llkIe

Good Grief.

oodNews.

4

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