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September 09, 1988 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-09

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4

ARTS
Friday, September 9, 1988

Tfe Michigan Daily
krek
fest out
of this
world
BY MARK SHAIMAN
TREKKIES rejoice! You may have
seen every episode and all of the
movies, but here is the stuff you
cannot find anywhere else. Two
hours of rare footage will be
presented in a Star Trek Fest that no
fan should miss.
.The "sequel" series, Star Trek:
The Next Generation, may have
spgwned new interest in the original
slifw, but Star Trek's popularity
hi not waned since it became
syndicated. It is hard to flip the dial
or a Saturday afternoon and not
cope across an episode, and it is
eqally difficult to not watch it. And
wO four films and a fifth on the
why, it is clear that Star Trek is a
th g of the present, not just the
Pt.
j*his Fest is a chance to see
exerpts that are not generally
available. There are bloopers such as
Spock's ears falling off and Nimoy
bSaking into an illogical smile.
Sines from the second TV pilot
"Where No Man Has Gone Before,"
w ch was only aired once, will be
slwn, as well as one of the
ai ated Saturday morning kids'
shows - so bad that it's funny.
A ten-minute film on the making
of tar Trek IV: The Voyage Home
wit also be shown, and topping off
the show is a Trivia Quiz, where
yog can test your knowledge against
oter Trekkies. There is something
fo veryone, from the novices to the

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Page 12
ape,

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1,

PARK SHAIMAN

Film is a means of expression that can be entertaining or even
political or socially meaningful. Un-fortunately, it is a rare film that
makes use of the latter possibilities. Even rarer is one which does this
successfully. Thus it is quite ironic that the film that does provide such
a powerful impact is called Shame.
Shame is set in a small town in Australia, but it does not matter
that it is either a small town or Australia. What does matter is its the
story about rape and its effects on the vic-tims, wherever they may be.
The opening of the film is much like that of a Mad Max film- a
lone biker, Asta, comes to town and is forced to remain until spare
parts for the bike arrive. And here too, this person takes justice into her
own hands. But this is not a futuristic, post-apocalypse Australia;
Shame takes place now and this reinforces the realism of the story,
which is unfortunately too real.
Lizzie, the daughter of the garage-owner with whom Asta is staying,
was raped the previous night by a bunch of teen-aged boys who spend
their nights harrassing women. Be-cause of this, Lizzie is ostracized by
the townspeople and scorned by her family. Common opinion is that
the boys were "just having some fun" and that Lizzie is a slut.
Asta herself is attacked, but not afraid to fight back. From this,
Lizzie gains courage and presses charges. This only causes more prob-
lems, but problems that must be met, and Shame is prepared to meet
them. This is not a film that is afraid to confront a major problem in
society today. It clearly calls for the public to take a stance, because
that is the only way to bring an end to the threat.
Because of its subject matter, Shame is a difficult film to watch;
but for the same reason it is one that should be seen. The extent of the
damage done to Lizzie is obvious throughout the movie. And it is just
as obvious that jailing the criminals will not do Lizzie any good. What
is done is done is the sad truth of rape. Still, the film does instill the
point that the menace must be stopped by dealing severely with the
offenders.
In a town such as Ann Arbor, with a disturbingly high amount of
rapes on campus, it is appropriate that this film is being shown at the
beginning of the term. If one person learns something from this film,
then the time and money invested in the production of Shame will be
entirely worth it.
Shame will be playing at the Michigan Theater each night until
September 15. Check daily for show times.

1 ?
3
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4
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William Shatner, DeForrest Kelly, and Leonard Nimoy stand about the transporter room in
silent admiration of the fact that we ran this entire article without once using the phrase,
"Beam me up." Oops.

die-hard.
Although the original TV show
was only on the air for three seasons
- from 1966 to 1969 - and it
never hit the top ten in the Nielsen
ratings, its appeal is still as strong

as ever. Just the fact that it is still
popular on campuses is significant,
since Star Trek is now as old as the
average student. It is this "next
generation" that will keep the
tradition alive with help from fests

like this.
The Star Trek Fest will beam in
at 7:30 p.m.Sunday at the Michigan
Theater. Admission is $3.75 and
$2.50 for students.

ra
x4

This year our season
comes in two varieties.

r,

Let Them Know
How You FeeII I
DAILY PERSONALS 764-0557
o THE
WEIGHT
CONTROL FALL SESSION
CLINIC BEGINS
oatte SEPTEMBER 19, 1988
unIvrsfy of Michigan CALL 747-2722
Is no Secret!

4

,.

SPECIAL
BLEND

4
4

Some names you have heard of-Mark Twain, Hal Holbrook,
Colleen Dewhurst, Eugene O'Neill, Neil Simon, William
Shakespeare, Arthur Miller.
After $2,000,000 in restoration the historic Michigan Theater
is a classic playhouse. Our Drama Season 1989 will host a
star-studded line up of shows.

Serious Fun! "Outstanding," "Provocative," "Electrifying,"
"Sensuous," "Fantastic," "Stunning."
Mix together contemporary classical music, postmodern dance, new age
vaudeville, vanguard jazz, doo wop, and what do you get? The Serious Fun
Series!

e
t
t
t
a

University of Michigan
Get all The News delivered every morning.

Ann Arbor, home of the University of Michigan, a high-tech haven, a great place to visit, a fun place to live and a vibrant center for the arts. The
Michigan Theater is Ann Arbor's auditorium, a 1928 movie palace restored to its original splendor. The Michigan Theater bustles with great events
every day of the week. See a classic film, enjoy a concert or subscribe to Drama Season 1989 or the Serious Fun Series. Call 668-8480 for a tape
recorded listing of events. Call 668-8397 to order tickets or to get more information. Make the Michigan Theater a fun part of your life (seriously)!

N,

The Detroit News Student Discount $1.00 per week
For dorm & off campus delivery, call 973-7177

j

0

DRAMA
SEASON 1989
ATi THElM \IIaiA\ JilAll-
Hal Holbrook in MARK TWAIN TONIGHT-Oct. 4
Colleen Dewhurst as Mrs. Eugene O'Neill in MY GENE-Oct. 25
Neil Simon's touching comedy BROADWAY BOUND-Jan. 22, 7 p.m.
The Acting Company in LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST-Feb. 4
The Alley Theater in Arthur Miller's A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE-Mar. 16

AT TEMfCWaAN

I

THE PHILIP GLASS ENSEMBLE 1000 Airplanes On the Roof-Oct. 8
ISO AND THE BOBS Postmodern-Doo-Wop-Nov. 18
THE ART ENSEMBLE OF CHICAGO Great Black Music-Jan. 27
KRONOS QUARTET & ELECTRIC PHOENIX Music for Strings & Voices-Feb. 23
THE FLYING KARAMAZOV BROTHERS New Age Vaudeville-Mar. 18
STEVE REICH ANDl MUS5ICIANS G(rea~t Musaicawith a at-.. 8 S

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