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December 13, 1988 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-12-13

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, December 13, 1988 - Page 5

Ann Arbor named sixth
best cycling city in US

VY MICAH SCHMIT
With the reality of finals already
upon us and the vision of sugar
plums dancing in sub-freezing air,
bicycling may be the last thing on
people's minds.
But despite the frigid winter, Ann
Arbor is the sixth best North
American cycling city, according to
the November issue of Bicycling
Magazine.
Many Ann Arbor cyclists concur,
raising the roads and drivers' atti-
udes toward cyclists, among other
things.
'There are good roads - winding,
low traffic volume - and you can
always find someone to ride with,"
said Paul Alman, a member of the
Velo Club, the city's bicycle racing
organization. "You always run into
someone else cycling."
Because there are so many cy-
clists in Ann Arbor, drivers are more
used to them and respect their rights,
said Alman, who previously biked in
,Graduate
Continued from Page 1,
"I finished all of my hours and
would like a break from the academia
before attending law school in the
fall," said Ted Blum, a graduating
LSA senior. "Plus, there is no rea-
son to continue to pay high out-of-
state tuition since I've completed my
degree."
Though graduating engineering
senior Lisa Golke said spring com-
mencement in the stadium is more
exciting, she will be participating in
I Sunday's exercises.

the East.
Jayne Miller, bicycle coordinator
of Ann Arbor's Department of Parks
and Recreation, said the magazine
hailed Ann Arbor for providing ser-
vices including:
-A bicycle coordinator who works
full-time to promote biking advo-
cacy in Ann Arbor;
-Three cycling clubs -- the
Triathlon Club, the Velo Club and
the Ann Arbor Bicycle Touring So-
ciety which has more than 1,000
members making it the largest bicy-
cling club in the state;
-Extensive bicycle safety educa-
tion in elementary schools; and,
-Nearly 100 miles of specifically
marked bicycling routes.
Alman said the negatives of Ann
Arbor cycling are few, but he criti-
cized the lack of hills and the down-
town riders.
"If (people around campus) did in
cars what they do on bikes, weaving
in and out of traffic, going the

wrong way, they'd be arrested," Al-
man said.
"I understand, you're 18, 21 years
old, (you think) you're never going
to die," Alman said. Regular cy-
clists, though, "tend to be the
recipient of much of the (driver's)
reactions to those riders," he added.
Ann Arbor followed Seattle,
Wash.; Missoula, Mont.; Eugene,
Ore.; Washington, D.C.; and Indi-
anapolis.
The only Canadian city on the
list, Calgary, Alberta, finished
eighth.
Last year, the magazine asked for
nominations from all over North
America for the best city, Miller
said. Ann Arbor's recommendation
came from the Bicycling Coordinat-
ing Committee, a city department,
and the Ann Arbor Bicycle Touring
Society.
The magazine's editors, with help
from the National Bicycling Federa-
tion, reviewed the letters and cities.

DAVID LUBLINER/Doily
While recent blustery winds haven't been great for cycling and cyclists, Ann Arbor is ranked
as the sixth best cycling city in the United States.

"Many of my engineering class-
mates take an extra term (to com-
plete the requirements), so I'll be
graduating with them. All of your
LSA friends, however, have left
you."
Poet and Nobel laureate Joseph
Brodsky will speak at the com-
mencement. He and forest ecologist
and former Rackham Graduate
School Dean Stephen Spurr will re-
ceive honorary degrees Sunday.
The ceremonies will began at 2
p.m., after the graduates assemble at
1:15 in the arena's tunnel entrance.

CLASSIFIED ADSI Call 764-0557

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Wishes everyone a happy
holiday

V7

Call the Campus Information Center at 763-INFO,
for information about:
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campus information center -and a lot more!
For phone numbers on campus,
call the CAMPUS OPERATOR!

C

NOTICE:
The Michigan Daily will stop publishing on
Dec. 13 for the fall semester. Publication will
resume on Jan. 5, 1989.
Happy Holidays!

V
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