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December 13, 1988 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-12-13

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Ninety-nine years of editorial/freedom
Vol. IC, No. 67 Ann Arbor, Michigan - Tuesday, December 13, 1988 Copyright 1988, The Michigan Daily

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USC has

Wolverines

Bo may still have one
more trick up his sleeve

where it wants them

BCY STEVE PRICE
LOS ANGELES - Around the
country it is called "the granddaddy of
all Bowl games." But at Southern
Cal, it is called "home."
That's because the Trojans will
make their unprecedented 26th trip to
the Rose Bowl on Jan. 2, 1989. In
fact, USC has won more Rose Bowls
(18) than Michigan has even appeared
in (12).
The Trojans (10-1) earned the
right to play the Wolverines when
f they defeated cross-town rival UCLA,
31-22. That game typified what USC
Price is the sports editor of the
University of Southern California's
student newspaper, The Daily Trojan.
o18,000
saved in
Armenia
YEREVAN, U.S.S.R (AP) -
Rescuers working around the clock
with everything from their bare
hands to fiber optic cameras have
pulled more than 18,000 people
from earthquake wreckage, officials
said yesterday.
But the smell of decaying corpses
filled the air, and hope dwindled for
finding more survivors of Wednes-
day's earthquake in Soviet Armenia.
"People wander among the debris
of what used to be their homes,
straining their ears in the hope of
hearing the voice of a missing sister,
father, brother or simply any human
voice," the official news agency Tass
reported yesterday from Leninakan,
near the quake's epicenter.
Health Minister Yevgeny Chazov
estimated the quake killed up to
60,000 people.
Five days after the tragedy struck,
shelter and salvage equipment
remained in short supply.
Soviet television showed a man
and boy huddled over a fire in a
small bucket, their only source of
warmth during five nights spent on a
pile of rubble because there were not
enough tents, a television announcer
said. Snow and temperatures of 14 to
See Quake, Page 2

football is all about. Coming off a
bout with the measles earlier in the
week, quarterback Rodney Peete, who
finished second in Heisman Trophy
voting, completed 16-of-28 passes
aise USC 1488
for 189 yards and one touchdown. He
also ran for another score.
Furthermore, the Trojan defense,
which ranks second in the nation
against the run and 10th overall, shut

down UCLA quarterback Troy
Aikman, forcing the Bruins to settle
for three early field goals when they
were deep in USC territory.
The Trojan offense features
numerous stars in addition to Peete,
who finished the year with 208
completions, 2,654 yards and 18
touchdown passes.
All-America senior split end Erik
Affholter, who caught a USC record
63 passes this season, can always be
counted on to make the big catches,
and flanker John Jackson is a
speedster who continually manages
to evade even the toughest of
defenders.
See USC, Page 11

BY ADAM SCHEFTER
I have tried all week to sneak into
practice. Once, I was escorted out by
two offensive linemen. Well, not
exactly escorted. More like thrown.
Another time little Bo caught me
peeping and chased me out. He
almost got me, but someone 40
years younger will usually outrace
his competition.
I have tried everything to find out
the special plays that Michigan
plans to unleash against Southern
Cal. You know, those crazy plays
that you used to draw up with your
friends in elementary school. But
Schembechler is keeping the plays
top secret and with good reason.

They will make the difference in the
Michigan victory.
Schembechler has seen what a
little razzle-dazzle can do to
opposing defenses. It all started

himself. A dip-dip-de-do, double-
reverse flanker pass resulted in
another seven points.
And in the Big Ten clincher
against Illinois, on the fourth play
of the game, Bo was back to his old
tricks. Erick Anderson, the blocking
back in punt formation, received the
snap instead of the punter. No
touchdown on the play this time,
but it kept the drive alive, and
Michigan went on to score.
Now, Schembechler has all sorts
of fun things, besides Disneyland,
planned for his team. Some tailback
passes. Some reverses. Maybe even
that old Statue-of-Liberty play will
.See M, Page 11

against Michigan State. Mike
Gillette ran for a touchdown out of
punt formation for the deciding
score.
Then against Indiana, Bo outdid

Brrr!
Mark Binelli, an LSA
said waiting for buses
else who rides the bus

DAVID LUBLINER/Daily
first-year student, waits in yesterday's frigid weather for a North Campus bus. He
in the cold is the worst part about living on North Campus. But Mark and everyone
should take heart; it'll be warmer today.

Hostage
may face
execution
BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) - Kidnappers holding Lt.
Col. William Higgins said-yesterday they have decided to
execute the U.S. Marine as a spy for Israel.
"We have issued the irrevocable sentence to execute
this American spy" said a typewritten Arabic statement
signed by the Organization of the Oppressed on Earth,
delivered to the independent Beirut newspaper An-Nahar.
A photocopy of a picture purporting to show
Higgins, the most recent kidnap victim of nine
Americans held hostage in Lebanon, was plastered at the
bottom of the 15-line statement. Hostage holders in
Lebanon usually insert a picture with a statement to
prove its authenticity.
In its statement the group said the decision to kill
Higgins was a retaliation for Israeli attacks against "our
people in occupied Palestine" the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, as well as predominantly Shiite south Lebanon.
It also said Higgins would die in "revenge for the
blood of the martyrs of the latest Israeli raid" on a
Palestinian guerrilla base nine miles south of Beirut.
Nine guerrillas were killed Friday in the Israeli attack.
An Israeli officer also died.
In Washington, State Department spokesperson
Charles Redman said he had no details of the threat
beyond press reports.
"These hostages are all innocent victims" Redman
said. "They should all be released immediately. Col.
Higgins was there on a mission of peace as a member of
an international peacekeeping operation. He, like the
others, is an innocent victim," he said.
Nancy Beck, a department spokesperson, said later:
"The notion that kidnappers have the right to try their
victims is grotesque... The so-called trial and outcome
represent a cynical attempt to exploit the holding of
hostages, particularly during the Christman season."
Higgins, .of Danville, Ky., was head of an
observation group of 76 people attached to the United
Nations peacekeeping force in south Lebanon when he
was kidnapped near Tyre on Feb. 17.
The Organization of the Oppressed on Earth, believed
to be made up of Shiite Moslems loyal to Iran,
previously charged that Higgins used his U.N. unifonb
as a cover for espionage. United Nations and U.S.
officials denied the charge.
Fifteen foreigners are missing and presumed kidnapped
in Lebanon. The longest held hostage is American Terry
Anderson, chief Middle East correspondent for The
Associated Press. He was kidnapped March 16,1985.
2,000 to
graduate
on Sunday
BY FRAN OBEID
Wnter rnmmanrrampnt ri e e .w.ll t1a ro ..a

------------

Study finds high radon in

Grad

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ
Students who study on the lowest lev-
els of the Graduate Library may be sub-
jected to dangerous health risks, if results
from a Daily study of radon gas in Uni-
versity buildings are confirmed in follow-
up tests.
The recent study of 16 University
buildings and residence halls showed that
only the Grad had a radon level considered
unsafe by the Environmental Protection
Agency.
Radon is a colorless, odorless, radio-
active gas that has been linked to high
rates of lung cancer in many recent studies.
The EPA considers a level of more than 4
picoCuries per liter of air to be dangerous.
The results of the Daily study showed

the Grad to have a radon level of 37.7 pic-
oCuries per liter.
At such a level; one or more follow-up
tests should be administered, said Debbie
Arenberg, a health physicist for the U.S.
EPA. "Radon levels fluctuate all the time
and you may have just hit a peak time,"
she said.
The University should try to alleviate
the problem if further tests confirm the
high radon levels, although "there's no re-
gulation that says they have to," Arenberg
said.
"(A level of) 37 isn't anything to really
panic about, but it's something that
should be worried about in the long-term,"
she said.
The University has tested more than 20

buildings in the past, but there have been
no major problems, said University Plant
Director Russell Reister.
He said the University would test the
Grad to confirm the high radon level. "If
there's a problem in the Grad Library, we'd
have to go in and fix it," Reister said.
"If these numbers are corroborated,
we'll try and find some way to provide
ventilation for the area," he said.
Radon is produced when radioactive
uranium decays, which often happens in
the soil. Consequently, radon enters
houses and buildings through the ground
and is much more prevalent on lower lev-
els of buildings.
See Radon, Page 2

One of 16 radon test kits
used to perform a Daily study
of University buildings.

Business students stage auction
to benefit Ann Arbor's homeless

BY MICHAEL LUSTIG
The assignment in Entrepreneurship
483 was to make money.
But three business students decided in-
stead to make money for a cause.
"A lot of people were interested in
monetary vroiects." said Dan Gehrini a

Prof. of Business Administration Jack
Matson, the class instructor, said the three
students did "incredibly well" with the
project.
The auction, taking place at 4 p.m. to-
day at the U Club, is officially called the
"Fndi of the CSmcter lniunntR nch n tthe

Professional auctioneers Braun and Hel-
mer have donated their time to run the
auction, Chekal said.
The Business School Student Council
is co-sponsoring the auction and helped
defray some costs.
(''mmimant to the hnmPIPCe ,ill not

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